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News from 2013

Students concern inspire Student-led-Conference

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A group of students from the Division of Social Work and Social Care, after recognizing some of the main social concerns facing young people in the region, decided to look for answers by organizing Conference on 'Tackling Poverty in Bradford: Can Social Work and Social Care Influence Change?'

It is expected that Bradford will be acutely affected by the current Government’s austerity measures. We are facing the largest cuts to public services in over 80 years. In Bradford 37,000 youngsters are already living below the poverty line, the national average is 1 in 5, in some wards of Bradford the ratio of children in poverty is 1 in 2. The government and media rhetoric seems to place some of the blame for our economic woes on those in receipt of benefits.

In November 2012 a group of 1st year Social Work and Working With Children and Families students met together to plan an event which provides a platform to highlight serious issues associated with poverty in Bradford. We decided on a conference: ‘Tackling Poverty in Bradford: Can Social Work and Social Care Influence Change?’ which took place in Student Central on 27th February 2013. This conference involved a whole afternoon of activities, three expert speakers and a question and answer session with 3 panellists, including Sue Balcomb, Director of England Oxfam’s UK Poverty Program. Cindy Peek, Bradford Deputy Director of Children's Services, was our first speaker, Cindy highlighted poverty issues distinct to Bradford. Our second speaker, Neal Heard, from Bradford Alliance for Community Care, called for community action to fight the cuts. Our last speaker, Dr. Michael Lavalette, form the Social Work Action Network and Associate Professor of Social Work at Liverpool Hope University, gave an impassioned speech calling for strong resistance and campaigning from the social work profession to show we do not accept TINA - 'There Is No Alternative' - to austerity.

Social Work student, Richard Joy managed the arrangements with our guests. He and Sarah Green set up an email account for the event, a Facebook page and Twitter account. None of us had ever arranged a conference before. Two SSIS lecturers, Geraldine Graham (Social Work) and Lucy Cockburn (Working With Children, Young People and Families) gave us guidance on from the start where we had to decide what our event would be, it's focus and how to bring it together. We each took on individual and small group tasks. We asked work contacts, local services, national charities, other schools and academics if they would be interested in providing workshops on specific issues or if they would like to hold an information stall in Student Central. Kelly Pleasants and Jody Bates brought together over 10 Bradford front-line charity stalls for the event which set up in the Mall for the whole afternoon.

Jody and Kelly also created a 'Social Exclusion' workshop and organised the other four workshops with Sarah Green and Becky Grimshaw. Jamie Littlewood and Joanne Bird co-presented a workshop on 'Money Matters', looking at guidance for responsible budgeting options. The other workshops were hosted by professional and voluntary services and topics included topics homelessness, radical social work and front-line interventions with children and families. It took four months of background work from many students including Mandy Jackson, Kelly Wheeler and Amy Haswell to bring the event together. Everything from advertising to parking zones was given careful consideration. Other students volunteered on the day, helping to greet and direct over 140 attendees.It was a great group effort and an inspiring day.

We would like to sincerely thank the University of Bradford for allowing us to hold the event and would also like to thank everybody who participated. Our conference proved that with integrated cooperation between services and voluntary community-led agencies, poverty truly can be 'tackled'.

If you are concerned about how the austerity is affecting your family or community there is practical help and support. You can receive advice from the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), The Job Centre Plus and the trade union, Unite, who have created a 'Unite Community' group. Your local Community Centre may have support groups and your council website will have links to services and volunteering schemes in your area. You can also contact us by searching for 'Tackling Poverty' on Facebook or Twitter. Together we can create positive change.

From Bradford to World Social Work Day at Westminster

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Kate Karban from the Division of Social Work and Social Care, and Kelly Pleasants, a year one student on the BA Social Work, attended an event to celebrate World Social Work Day at Westminster. Kate made a brief presentation on the impact of social, economic and health inequalities and the ways in which social workers can address these issues in their practice.

The meeting was also addressed by Richard Wilkinson, co-author of 'The Spirit Level'. He presented evidence from the book regarding the need to reduce inequalities. He suggested that social workers need to act as advocates to challenge the prejudiced and stigmatised views of people in poverty.

The event was one of a number taking place nationally and internationally, to promote the Global Agenda for social work with this year's theme being 'promoting social and economic equality'.

Social Work student on a quest to raise awareness

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One of our students, Rosemary Ellingham as a volunteer for Stonewall, a lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) charity, was given the opportunity to deliver a seminar to the Social Work and Social Care division in order to raise awareness of the effects of homophobic bullying. The aim of this seminar was to equip practitioners with knowledge of how to support young LGB people questioning their sexuality.

‘Bullying in schools in general is rife. However, homophobic bullying, which can have extremely negative effects on young people identifying as LGB or questioning their sexuality is extremely prevalent. As part of the youth volunteer programme with Stonewall Rose I was given the opportunity to deliver workshops in secondary schools in order to raise awareness of the effects that homophobia can have on young people. As a young person who struggled coming to terms with my sexuality and who has experienced homophobic bullying in schools, this gave me a great opportunity to tackle something very close to my heart.

I aimed my workshops at 12/13 year olds, with my main focus being to challenge any negative stereotypes young people may hold of LGB people. When delivering these workshops I was shocked to realise that many professionals are not aware of the support which is available for young people who are questioning their sexuality. This led to me delivering a seminar at University to academics and students working/studying in the area of social care, focusing not only on awareness raising of the effects of homophobia, but also to raise a basic awareness of Stonewall, and the support they can offer for anyone who may be questioning their sexuality. The seminar raised issues several issues among some students and I was able to challenge some stereotypes as well as inform people about certain government legislations surrounding LGBT people. Tackling homophobia is something I am extremely passionate about. I hope that through the work I have done with Stonewall and the seminar I delivered, I have been able to raise t awareness of LGB issues, with regard both to the effects of homophobia and the support that is available’.

Cafcass Pre-Proceedings Pilot

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The Cafcass Pre-Proceedings Pilot that sought to test the added value of the family court advisor in pre-proceedings practice is now complete in Coventry and Warwickshire. In addition, the same project in Liverpool is sufficiently progressed, such that it is timely to report on this initiative.

Key and important messages from this project provide interesting insights into the opportunities but also challenges to effecting change in local family justice systems. The pilot project has enabled the team to follow up in some detail 75 pre-proceedings cases across the three sites, and to follow the twists and turns that cases have taken in respect of both diversion from, and the duration of care proceedings. Findings are derived from detailed prospective tracking of cases in which the family court advisor was involved in pre-proceedings (the Cafcass PLUS sample) and a cohort of comparator cases. The Family Justice Review (MOJ, 2011) and the Government response (MOJ, 2012) set in train a modernization agenda of the Family Courts which is supported by the Crime and Courts Act 2013, and the Children and Families Bill which is currently before Parliament. The reform is far reaching, with the formation of a single Family Court in April 2014 and strict timescales for the duration of cases (26 weeks).

Only time will tell if planned changes can deliver much shorter care proceedings, achieving the proposed target of 26 weeks is ambitious and will require good pre-proceedings work and a whole system change. Messages from this pilot study offer some very positive observations in respect of safe and effective diversion, but outcomes in respect of the duration of care proceedings highlight the difficulties in effecting change in complex systems. We offer an analysis of the barriers to change drawing on the theoretical literature and offer practical suggestions about how change can be achieved in complex systems.

For Full Report please download:

Coventry Warwickshire Pre-Proceeding Report

Liverpool Pre-Proceeding Report

Kim Holt and Dr Nancy Kelly – University of Bradford

Dr Karen Broadhurst and Dr Paula Doherty – University of Lancaster

New offering from the Social Work Placement Team

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Hot off the press : Co-authored by Angie Sheard (placement team) and Julie Adams guide to 'Positive Social Work' The Essential Toolkit for NQSW's is a practical, step-by-step guide to the first year in practice.

Angie Sheard has recently joined the placement team, together with colleague and friend Julie Adams is celebrating the publication of their first book. ‘Positive Social Work’ is a practical, step-by-step guide to a social worker’s first year in practice. Written in simple terms it links directly to the new Professional Capabilities Framework and offers a tool to support Newly Qualified Social Workers’s through their Assessed and Supported Year in Employment. The focus of the book is to encourage NQSW’s to develop positive habits that will sustain them throughout their career.

Chapters include: managing stress and avoiding burnout; work-life-balance; developing emotional intelligence; what to expect when you enter practice; sources of support and much more. There are practical exercises and activities, along with case studies and suggestions for further reading. The final chapter focuses on the ASYE assessor and aims to support them in managing their NQSW’s through the first year in practice. This book is a not only great new resource for NQSW’s but also for students and for all who are involved in Social Work Education.

Police and Penal Services

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The School Learning and Teaching Fund has funded recent work with ACJS Level 2 students. Each group taking part in the project received three lectures, three seminars and three visits. The visits were to Bradford central police station, the court and Armley prison. The seminars were on punishment, professional offender management and policing diversity- hate crime

The level 2 module, Police and Penal Services has had a major overhaul this year. Students are now guaranteed the opportunity to visit a prison, a police station and to spend an afternoon at the City Court. The visits offer a chance to meet and discuss issues with probation, police and prison personnel.

University based teaching is offered by a serving police officer and by a member of the probation services, so students can supplement their academic learning with up to date policy issues and understanding practice. Lecturers also offer small group seminars to explore particular issues. This year, seminars have looked at what appropriate punishment means, have explored issues around professional service and privatisation and are currently looking at ways in which hate crime is policed in a diverse society.

Academic Engagement

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Dr Paul Sullivan took part in the debate of the Migration, Multiculturalism, Integration and Identity - Dialogical Approaches Network, organized by the Institute of Social Psychology at the London School of Economics.

The debate entitled ‘Methodological issues for Dialogical Analysis’ were organized in the form of a dialogue between Ivana Markova and Paul Sullivan.

The key questions raised during this debate were: Are there special methods for dialogical analysis? Or can any existing method be used to analyse dialogue? Ivana Markova and Paul Sullivan, two experts on dialogical research, discussed what Bakhtin brings to methodological analysis.

Celebrating Staff Successes

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Presenting: Dr Martyn Housden, Dr Clare Becket, Dr Anna Barker and Dr Ala Sirriyeh will visit to the Universidad de Málaga

4 members of staff (Martyn Housden, Clare Becket, Anna Barker and Ala Sirriyeh) are going to be visiting the Universidad de Málagain May through an ERASMUS exchange to teach guest lectures in the Department of Criminology. They will be followed over the summer by three students going out there to pursue research projects with Spanish staff which, hopefully, will inform their final year dissertations

New book published by Dr Tom Cockburn on 'Rethinking Children's Citizenship (Studies in Childhood and Youth)'

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'Citizenship is a phenomenon that encompasses the relationships between the state and individuals, rights and responsibilities and identity and nationhood. Yet the relationship between citizenship and childhood has gone relatively unexplored. This book examines this relationship by situating it within the historical development of modern forms of citizenship that have formed contemporary Western notions of childhood and citizenship. The book also engages with recent political and social theory to rethink our current view of citizenship and develops an understanding that emphasises social interdependence and calls for a concomitant re-evaluation of our public spaces that facilitates the recognition of children as participating agents within society.

The book will be of interest to those working across a wide number of disciplines, including politics, sociology, education, health, social work, childhood studies, youth studies, law and social policy, together with policy-makers, teachers and practitioners in allied areas.'

Julia Buxton on the BBC World Service

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Julia Buxton was a guest on a half hour Newshour special on the BBC World Service on Saturday 5th January discussing the political situation in light of President Chavez's serious illness.

The podcast is available at:

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/worldservice/newshour/newshour_20130105-1317a.mp3

ESRC Funding Success - Professor Jenny Pearce and the International Centre for Participation Studies/Programme for a Peaceful City team

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Professor Jenny Pearce and the team at the International Centre for Participation Studies/ Programme for a Peaceful City (Graeme Chesters, Ute Kelly and Lisa Cumming) have won a one year ESRC Knowledge Exchange award with part funding from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation

The aim of the project is to pilot the idea of a ‘Community University' (Comm-Uni-ty) in the North of England. Building on an AHRC funded Scoping Study - ‘Power in Community: A Research and Social Action Scoping Review’ (Pearce, 2012), the Comm-Uni-ty will deepen critical exploration of Power and Participation with community activists, including participants in that study. In particular, Comm-Uni-ty will draw on the key learning from the Scoping Study and involve academics and community activists in developing ideas for how alternative understandings of power might build more effective change processes.

The death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez

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Following the death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez March 5th, Dr Julia Buxton provided comments to a range of media including BBC Breakfast News, BBC World News, BBC World Service, Sky News, Radio Five Live, Russia Today, Radio France National and Radio Austria.

Obituaries and reflections on Chavez’s legacy by Julia can be read below on New Internationalist, Open Democracy and the Latin America Bureau.

http://newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2013/03/08/hugo-chavez-reluctant-revolutionary/

http://www.opendemocracy.net/opensecurity/julia-buxton/from-bust-to-boom-chavezs-economic-legacy

http://lab.org.uk/venezuela-sustainability-will-be-the-test-of-chavismo


Professor Mike Pugh: The Netherlands Advisory Council on International Affairs

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On 24 March 2013 presented oral and written evidence to The Netherlands Advisory Council on International Affairs on the nexus between crime, corruption and instability.

Professor Jenny Pearce - Welsh Peace Academy

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was key note speaker for a conference to set up a Welsh Peace Academy in Aberystwyth on 23 March. Her presentation was entitled: From the Edges, From the Margins and From Below: Understanding Social Action for Peace.

Professor Jenny Pearce - Colombian Peace Process

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Professor Jenny Pearce has given three presentations on the Colombian Peace Process between January and April 2013.

The first was for RUSI in London on 28 January. She presented on the role of civil society and peace to their conference on” Ending Colombia's Internal Conflict: Prospects for Peace with the FARC and Beyond". The second was at the LSE , for a conference on 13 March :The Colombian Peace Talks - Lessons from other Negotiations" where she compared the Central American Peace Talks in Guatemala and El Salvador and asked what could be learnt for Colombia. Her presentation was entitled: ‘Give Peace A Chance: Towards Violence Reduction not Reproduction after War. Lessons for Colombia from the Central American Peace Processes’ On 12 April, spoke on ‘ Elites, Violence and Peace’ at a half day workshop: ‘In search of peace in Colombia: Unrapping the Santos-Farc Peace Talks’ organised by the Sussex Centre for Conflict and Security Research. Jenny is also part of a network of academics in the UK who are accompanying the Colombian peace process. It is known as BACUP (British Academics for a Colombia Under Peace). Summaries of Jenny’s lectures are available on the website:http://bacupblog.wordpress.com/.

19th Bradford Development Lecture - Dr Stefan Dercon

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Chief Economist of DFID on African growth

The 19th Bradford Development Lecture given by Dr Stefan Dercon, Chief Economist of DFID on the theme of 'Africa's growth miracle?' summarised the key trends to raise and answer several important questions. Growth performance of several African nations during the last decade has been unprecedented- while rise in commodity prices has played a small role, rise in the magnitude of commodity export volumes and increase in FDI and remittance flows are also important factors.

However, as Stefan highlights, much of this growth has been accompanied by little by way of growth in jobs - mining and extraction sectors typically generate fewer jobs especially for the local population. The presentation also highlighted the demographic dividend in terms of youthful population and how efforts to promote labour intensive manufacturing activities and other productive sectors will be crucial to realising sustainable and inclusive growth in Africa.

Questions raised by participants touched on many issues including issues of ownership of development strategies, the role of education and of dealing with governance challenges especially in some of the countries sometimes referred to as fragile states. From the lecture and discussion what could we say about the Africa's growth miracle? We could say that: yes, there is some evidence of strong growth performance, but perhaps it is not yet a miracle; it could be a miracle if properly managed over the next few decades.

The lecture was attended by over 100 participants including many staff and student members from across the University, local government, local firms and independent development experts.

Special thanks to all the Student Volunteers who had helped in the organisation of this lecture.

Comments on this lecture are welcome. If you have comments or suggestions for future lectures please send these to: p.b.anand@bradford.ac.uk

You can access the slides here: BDL 19 presentation slides (pdf, 2.59MB)

Research Student Spotlight

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Our PhD Student Profile: Eko Priyo Purnomo

My name is Eko Priyo Purnomo. I am interested in the process of policy making in regards to a natural resources management which puts focus on equal and open access to natural resources and sustainability. I am especially interested in how to design and implement alternative policies which can give way to natural resources exploitation while on the other hand sustain the development and livelihood of the community.

I have a permanent post as a lecturer at the University Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta. I have been on a sabbatical to complete my PhD. I came to Bradford having completed a one year Master of Research at the University of Leeds.

I realized that my master degree and professional experiences are not sufficient to understand the complex problem of the design and making of alternative policy which concern natural resources exploitation as well as sustainable development issues. I came to the Bradford Centre for International Development (BCID) here at the University of Bradford because of the expertise of staff members and their extensive experience in research, teaching and technology. This is also helping my long time goal of becoming a rigorous academic. I believe my time here will help me create a network amongst international practitioners, and lecturers who work on the issues about policy-making and its relevance with creating sustainable development.

Why BCID in Bradford?

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By choosing the Bradford Centre for International Development you will be choosing the only centre in Yorkshire specialising in International Development that has been at the forefront of knowledge transfer in this field from 1969.

Why is there so much poverty? How come some developing countries are able to continue to post double digit economic growth rates in spite of economic downturn in the global North? Why does economic growth not translate into lasting development? Have Millennium Development Goals been a success? What shall we replace them with after 2015? Why do corruption and institutional problems persist in some countries? How do we choose between different projects? What methods can we use for better project design and project monitoring? What can we do to build strong and resilient teams and develop institutional capacity of organisations? What is the role of leadership in public service organisations? If you are interested in questions such as these, you will really enjoy being on one of our Masters degrees.

Our suite of six Masters degrees has an excellent reputation worldwide- with the first MSc graduates completing their degree in 1980. Since then, we have been privileged to have our alumni in many senior positions across the world- including a former prime minister of an Asian middle income country, several cabinet ministers in at least three African countries, a chief economist of a development bank, a reputed consultant in project planning in all of the Caribbean, a Deputy Vice chancellor in Africa not to mention those currently in senior positions in international NGOs.

Though the postgraduate programme has a history of 33 years, there is constant innovation and development. For example, MPA our newest degree was introduced a year ago replacing the erstwhile MSc in public policy and programme management.

All our Masters' programmes encourage students to develop their learning skills, personal and transferable skills for communication, research and planning, and the knowledge and skills to become a reflective and critical practitioner.

94 per cent of a sample of our existing MA students agreed or strongly agreed with the statement:

“I will recommend this course to others who are thinking of studying for a masters degree in this field”

BCID PG Student survey- May 2013

Postgraduate Research Degrees

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PhD can be a life changing experience ¿ it can make you a different person ¿ hopefully more analytical, confident and secure in knowledge and able to think through complex problems. Ten of our staff members who have a PhD believe in the value of a PhD and are here to facilitate you. Our unique strength is that apart from academic recognition, many amongst our staff members also have had considerable experience of practice and policy making and delivery in the field.

Two of our staff members previously held the positions of ‘research director’ in international development research institutes. Another staff member had spent 6 years working in an advisory capacity with the Ministry of Agriculture in an African country and yet another staff member led an international team in the writing of a national human development report in an Asian country. Many of our staff members publish quite regularly- many have published books and journal articles. Many of them are also refereeing papers for top rated journals such as World Development, European Journal of Development Research, Journal of Development Studies and so on. When you join here as a PhD student, you will be joining this rich and diverse environment where individuals are close to the frontier of knowledge of their own discipline and professional practice.

A number of candidates have successfully defended their thesis and earned the coveted letters of Dr to their name during the last 12 months. These include among others:

  • Anton Sabella is a lecturer at the Bridget University, Palestine. He has just recently completed his PhD in the field of middle and senior management Development, in the Telecommunication Industry in Palestine. He will graduate in July 2013.
  • Waheed Akthar, from Pakistan, researched the topic “Understanding madrassah education and its impacts”. He has successfully completed his PhD in November 2012 and is presently a visiting research scholar in Australia.
  • Ibrahim Bakare, from Nigeria, completed his PhD research on the topic of “Governance, poverty and natural resource management”. He is presently working on developing publications and on further research.

Current areas of research and PhD supervision include:

  • Economic growth, development
  • Human development, the environment and social justice
  • Human and organisational Capacity Building
  • International trade and economic development
  • Institutions and institutional change including new institutional economics
  • Leadership in difficult contexts
  • Migration and remittances
  • New philanthropy and third sector
  • Public policy and strategic management in the public sector
  • SME and microfinance
  • The role of good governance and accountability in improving development performance

If you have a topic and want to find out if that fits in with our expertise, do not hesitate to get in touch with us. PhD is a significant commitment of your time and done properly can be immensely valuable to your career and development. Our aim is to facilitate your development while at the same time advancing knowledge.

Research Student Spotlight

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Our PhD Student Profile: Sumaila I. Asuru

My name is Sumaila, I am 26 years old, and I have just begun researching on - the contribution of philanthropic donations to agricultural development. I studied MSc Public Policy and Programme Management from the BCID only last year. I am from Ghana; my parents are both civil servants at the moment. The year 2011 was actually the first time I moved out of my country to Europe.

My decision to come to the University of Bradford was on the basis of the programme (MSc Public Policy and Programme Management). Upon going through the brochure, I quickly developed great interest in the degree and I went for it. The degree combination in itself attracted me as it mixed reasonably well with my educational experience. The other reason was the convenience of a one year course as compared to other countries where it could have taken me two years to complete a masters degree. After going through the system for the past year, I have come to the conclusion that BCID is a world-class centre for international development studies and therefore have decided to pursue my PhD here.

The experience has been great so far: I have practically gained a lot out of this great establishment. I have also obtained a weightier academic awareness on international development practices and policy. I hope to be among the top academic researchers in the near future.

Master Student Spotlight

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Our MA student profile: Sara La Malfa, 2012 - 2013, MSc Project Planing and Management

How would you introduce yourself?

My name is Sara, I am 24 years old and I am Italian. I am currently a postgraduate student at the University of Bradford and I am enrolled in the MSc in Project Planning and Management.

How did you come to study at the BCID?

I wanted to study in the United Kingdom because of its prestigious education system and I was looking for a specific MSc. I wanted a degree in project management but which was particularly related to international development studies. After a long research I realised that the degree course I was looking for was delivered at the University of Bradford within the BCID and I decided to apply for it.

What do you think you have gained from it?

I think that choosing to study at the BCID was a brilliant decision: I learned much about development and about current issues through engaging lectures and discussions with colleagues from all over the world. I have familiarised better with the academic environment thanks to guest lectures and a constant contacts with the lecturers, especially the personal tutor and the supervisor. I have gained transferable skills such as working in teams and presentation skills. Finally, I have learned how to write academic essays which I believe will be very useful in the future.

How was the study experience at Bradford for you?

The many services available for the students are what made my experience very valuable. I had the chance to receive advice from the career service, I could participate to a lively academic environment with the many activities and conferences organised by the departments in the university and I could enjoy the several leisure activities organised by the Student Union and the language centre/ room 101.

Alumni News

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From an alumnus: Mamadou Diarra, MSc National Development and Project Planning (1990-1991)

I am from NIGER, a French speaking country in West Africa. I am electrical Engineer graduated from the Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs (Bamako), Mali, West Africa.

After some years of professional experience, in the National Power Utility (NIGELEC) in the Planning Department, I went to the Development and Project Planning Centre, at the University of Bradford for a MSc in National Development and Project Planning in 1990-1991.

In 1996-1997, I was awarded the Humphrey Fellowship for one year professional Development in Energy, Environment and project appraisal at Rutgers University (USA).

Well, before coming to the University of Bradford, I had a choice among many universities. But a World Bank staff with whom I worked on projects in NIGELEC advised me to do my MSc at the University of Bradford because it has a great reputation in the field of project appraisal.

I have taken one year off from my job that means without pay. It is a lot of sacrifice.

Fortunately I was lucky to be awarded the British Professional Access Scheme (British Council) from the UK Department of Trade and Industry, for three months and it has really helped me finish my training. Thanks to that fellowship, I got internship with some British Consulting Engineers, such as Sir Alexander and Gibbs in Reading and with Merz and McLeland in Newcastle.

Studying at Bradford really was a fantastic experience. In the class, there were students from all over the world: Nepal, India, Pakistan, UK (of course), Zambia, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Saint Kitts, etc...and you learnt a lot with such a melting pot. I lived in an apartment near Barclays Bank, not far from the University.

The degree has helped me in assessing power projects. With this new knowledge, I have trained about 45 NGOs in project formulation, the staff of the Ministry of Mines and Energy, of the Ministry of Planning and from the Office of the Prime Minister. I have also run many courses on project appraisal.

I ran with some colleagues a seminar on the appraisal of energy projects, three weeks ago.

I will be glad to exchange case studies on energy, industrial or mining projects with anyone interested. My email is: mamadou_diarra@yahoo.com

Master Student Spotlight

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Our MA-student profile: Mohamed Alomran, 2012-2013, MSc Project Planning and Management

My name is Mohamed. I'm 25 years old from Bahrain. I have graduated from the University of Bradford as a Software Engineer. I'm currently enrolled in BCID in MSc Project Planning and Management.

After an unsuccessful year of searching for a job after my undergraduate degree, I decided to do a master degree to boost my chance for a decent job. My main target was to do something related to business to have more opportunities other than IT jobs. My final year project's supervisor advised me to apply to SSIS (School of Social and International Studies) as they do have some courses in managerial field.

BCID was not what I wanted or expected, however, it was better. The course and BCID in general, opened my mind to the development world which I did not know much about. I realised it was much more important and relevant to where I come from than what I wanted in the first place. I gained a lot of knowledge and skills specially in dealing and communicating with other students in a group work, who are from different parts of the world, with different perspectives, cultures and ways of thinking. I also learned how to do research & criticise in a high academic level and work on a simulation project which made me feel how a project runs in real life.

Overall, Bradford study experience was useful and worth taking. Studying in a British academic system with lots of academic activities, conferences, guest lecturers and seminars, makes students learn more than what they have expected at the beginning.

Master Student Spotlight

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Our MA student profile: Chilungu Mwiinde, 2012 - 2013, MSc Development and Project Planning

How would you introduce yourself?

My name is Chilungu Mwiinde. I am a Zambian and socio-economic planner by profession, working for local-government. I am currently a BCID student in MSc Development and Project Planning

How did you come to study at BCID?

The desire for effectiveness in my current job responsibilities inspired me to look for a programme linking Project Planning with Development. The world-wide search for such a programme made me realise that BCID offered exactly (best option of) what I wanted. I further discovered that the University of Bradford was ranked among the best Universities in this field. I was therefore thrilled when I was offered a place in MSc Development and Project Planning. The truth is that I would not have managed to come for my studies without the World Bank Scholarship.

What do you think you have gained from it?

Studying this programme has opened up my mind in many ways. For instance, it has enhanced my:

  • understanding of some of the critical factors affecting development (such as public policies and institutions)
  • Project management skills which are critical for development in countries like Zambia
  • Critical thinking (analytical) skills in academic research and writing

How was the study experience at Bradford for you?

My experience has been excellent. Considering that I came in a motherly way made me think things would very difficult for me. Amazingly, the lecturers have been very helpful and understanding throughout my program. Additionally, other university officers like Sue Baker and Joanne have been very supportive and encouraging. Coming to Bradford also gave me an opportunity for meeting and interacting with different people from all over the world which has helped me appreciate cultural differences in perception of things.

Saeed Rid, PhD student (Peace Studies) - in the news

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Saeed Rid has written a series of articles in leading Pakistani newspaper The News International since October 2012 to September 2013. The first article was published on 10 October on new liberalized visa agreement between India and Pakistan which has relaxed the iron curtain style visa regulations between the two countries. The second article was published on 5 June 2013 discussing Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s third tenure as PM and what it means for India Pakistan relations and peace with India. The third article was published on 10 July discussing Aman ki Asha (the joint peace initiative of the Times of India and the Jang group, the two largest Indian and Pakistani media houses) can use their strategic partnership with Rotary International to build peace at the grassroots in India and Pakistan. Saeed’s fourth and so far the last article in the series was published on 03 September on Pakistani government’s talks with Pakistani Taliban.

All his articles can be accessed on this link http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintWriterName.aspx?URL=Saeed%20Ahmed%20Rid

Saeed's research topic is: Interactive People to People Contacts (IPPC) between India and Pakistan: A case study of PIPFPD and Aman ki Asha peacebuilding efforts in Pakistan-Achievements, limitations and prospects.

James O'Connell 1925-2013

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James O'Connell, Emeritus Professor of Peace Studies, who has died at the age of 87 after a short illness.

Professor O’Connell served as Head of Department of Peace Studies from 1978 to his retirement in 1993 and was a leading figure in the development of the University in the 1980s with periods as Dean of Social Sciences and Pro-Vice Chancellor. James played a major role in ensuring that the University survived the huge cuts imposed by the University Grants Committee in 1981 but his most enduring legacy lies in the development of Peace Studies at Bradford. During his time as Head, the Department grew from six academic staff to twenty-one and achieved international recognition as one of the world’s leading centres for peace research. This was a remarkable achievement given that it involved the development of a markedly interdisciplinary department drawing on the social and natural sciences. Moreover, given that much of the work was in areas that involved critical analysis, it required singularly high academic standards. During James’s period as Head, the foundations were laid for a group of scholars that, by 2008, could easily outscore many Russell Group universities in the Research Assessment Exercise.

The obituary, by Professor Paul Rogers, can be found at the following link:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2013/sep/19/james-oconnell-academic-dies-87

Peace Studies Book Launch in Colombia

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Paso a Paso (Peace, Piece by Piece)

At the inauguration of the academic year at the University for Peace in Costa Rica this August, Adam Baird alumni (PhD 2011, Bradford Peace Studies Department) who is currently an Assistant Professor at the University presented the book Paz, Paso a Paso (Peace, Piece by Piece) to the Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla. Paz, Paso a Paso is an edited volume focusing on the Colombian conflict which brings together former and present Peace Studies Department students who have worked under the supervision of. The book, and an ever-growing body of students whose research focuses on Colombia at the Peace Studies Department, is a reflection of the hard work over a number of years of Professor Pearce.

This book was launched by several students and Professor Pearce in Medellin and Bogota in July. The book is dedicated to Libby Kerr, a PhD student in Peace Studies, who sadly passed away last year, and also author of a chapter in the book.

Peacekeeping and Rapid Reaction Workshop summary

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The Division of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford hosted a workshop on 8th July 2013 supported by Global Action to Prevent War and Armed Conflict (GAPW), and the World Federalist Movement Canada, titled "Peacekeeping and Rapid Reaction: Towards the establishment of cosmopolitan capacities for rapid deployment."

The workshop had two main goals. Firstly to chart the theoretical and practical development of peacekeeping operations, incorporating cosmopolitan approaches to international conflict resolution; secondly, to analyse the role of standing, rapid reaction peacekeeping capacities (at national and international levels) as suitable tools for governments, regional organisations and the United Nations.

Please see the following for more details including a full report of the workshop:

Workshop Summary

Bradford Write Up Sept

Grant Awarded to Dr Fiona Macaulay

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has been awarded a grant of £20,175 by the British Council and the São Paulo state research council to run a two-day workshop in São Paulo on ‘Comparative Approaches to Security Sector Reform, with a special focus on the penal system’. It will bring together early career researchers working on security security reform, 20 from the UK and 20 from São Paulo state. The workshop’s focus is on career development, international collaboration, network building and peer mentoring. The grant is part of the British Council’s Researcher Links programme, which funded only one in eight of the proposals received in relation to Brazil. For more information see http://www.fapesp.br/en/8112

Applications welcomed for UK-Brazil Security Sector and Penal Reform workshop March 2014

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Dr Fiona Macaulay has been awarded funding under the Researcher Links scheme funded by the British Council and São Paulo State Research Council to hold a two-day workshop on 'Comparative Approaches to Security Sector Reform, with a special focus on the Penal System' in São Paulo on 13-14 March 2014.

The workshop’s focus is on career development, international collaboration, network building and peer mentoring. The workshop is being coordinated by Dr Fiona Macaulay of the University of Bradford Peace Studies Department and Dr Renato Lima, of the Brazilian Forum on Public Security, and will have contributions from other leading researchers – Professor Alice Hills of the University of Durham, and Professor Roy King, Emeritus Professor, University of Bangor from the UK, and Dr Fernando Salla, from the Centre for the Study of Violence, University of Sao Paulo, and Dr Túlio Kahn, UNDP consultant and former Chief executive of the Latin American Institute on Crime (ILANUD).

We are now inviting Early Career Researchers from the UK and Brazil to apply to attend this workshop. All travel and accommodation expenses will be covered by the Researcher Links programme. The application form, with more details on the initiative, is attached and should be sent to Dr Macaulay at f.macaulay@bradford.ac.uk before the deadline of 1 December 2013.

UK Brazil Workshop Application Form

UK Brazil Workshop call for participants

Peace Studies International Conference (May 2014)

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International Conference to be held as part of the 40th Anniversary Celebrations of the Division of Peace Studies, University of Bradford

Call for papers: Why War? Peace Studies in the 21st Century.

Confirmed Keynote speakers:

Dr Saeb Erekat, Chief Negotiator for the Palestinian Authority

Professor John Paul Lederach, Professor of International Peacebuilding, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame.

Peace Studies at the University of Bradford is celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2014. To mark the occasion we are hosting an international conference, and are seeking presenters to give papers on the future of peace studies in the 21st Century.

The conference is organised around eight themes:

• Disarmament;
• War and Peace in Africa;
• Peace Education:
• Participation;
• Conflict Resolution;

• Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding;
• Philosophy and War;
• the Security-Development Nexus.

We share our anniversary year with the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, but also with the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Inspired by the correspondence between Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud in 1931-2 on the question, “Why War?” and its goal of exerting “a significant and wholesome moral influence on the solution of political problems,” we are inviting scholars and practitioners to Bradford to debate the intellectual agenda for peace studies in the next century.

Within each theme, the aim is to generate discussion over the state of peace studies, future challenges and directions, and the relationship between theory and practice. The conference thus aims to emulate the spirit animating the Einstein-Freud correspondence, while focusing on contemporary theoretical and political issues.

Please find the full Call for Papers here: Peace Studies International Conference (May 2014)


Paper abstracts of up to 250 words should be submitted to the organising committee by 14 February 2014. The submission must state the title, author(s) name and affiliation, and the relevant thematic stream. Applicants will be notified by 28 February if they have been accepted for the conference.

Conference participation is free but no travel or accommodation grants can be provided.

Registration for the conference opens on 1 December 2013 and continues until 31 March 2014.

For all enquiries or to submit an abstract for consideration, please email peacestudies40@bradford.ac.uk

Master Student Spotlight

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Prior to this year's graduation ceremony our graduate Marijke Synhaeve (MA in International Development Management) looks back

November 2013

It’s been over a year now since I moved to Bradford to study International Development Management and there is no other word than ‘fantastic’ to describe the impact of this Postgraduate programme on my personal and working life.

As a cultural anthropologist with primarily theoretical knowledge I was looking for applicable Management knowledge and tools combined with in-depth theoretical knowledge on the current state of affairs in the field of International Cooperation. I was one of the youngest Postgraduate students and I wanted to be challenged. I was challenged, thanks to a group of passionate lecturers and highly motivated colleague-students with different levels of work experience in a variety of organisations, institutions and ministries. My colleague-students sharing their experiences ‘from the ground’ taught me more than I could ever have learned by reading books. After finishing my dissertation, I started my own business in project management. The business made a jump-start which is largely because of the knowledge, skills and self-confidence I gained during my postgraduate training and the network I was able to build.

Apart from the positive points mentioned before, the most important thing is that I had a fantastic time. It was one year of fun: long discussions, Bradford night-life, beautiful national parks on day-trip distance, several excursions to UK cities and villages, and having the luxury of being surrounded by remarkable new friends.

Dementia Expert Professor Murna Downs Speaks on BBC Breakfast

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The BBC has reported that an estimated 800,000 people in the UK live with dementia, a condition that can deprive people of their memories and alter their personalities. As the number of people with this condition continues to rise each year, it becomes ever more important to develop ways of dealing with it. The Belgian city of Bruges has created a dementia-friendly community, highlighting them as a pioneer in dealing with dementia.

Professor Murna Downs, Head of the at the Faculty of Health Studies, joined BBC Breakfast on 20th February 2013 to share her opinion.

She said: “In Bruges they focus both on the person’s experience and on the family’s experience, but also on the broader community and the role they play in helping families and people with dementia to live fuller lives with this condition.

“The wonderful part about Bruges is the attention they pay to the people with dementia and to their families to help them renegotiate their relationships and adapt to different abilities and wishes, the detailed work they do in people’s homes is probably the most inspiring aspect.”

Reporting for the BBC, Jenny Hill said that many projects and schemes in Bruges are already being deployed in the UK, with a focus on helping dementia sufferers through everyday activities like sport and music. The report confirmed that 41% of dementia sufferers go missing at some point and that the government is working with communities to deal with this issue.

Murna went on to say: “When combating dementia we need to consider the pace we live our lives at; we go too quickly for people with dementia to keep up with us. We really need to slow down in order to work at their pace of processing information and we’re a good way along the road to doing that.”

The School of Dementia Studies delivers a wide range of training courses, undergraduate and postgraduate programmes (by distance learning) and undertake research into dementia.

View the clip on the BBC website

Efficient 3D Corneal Modelling

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Held By: Prof. Rami Qahwaji

Total Value:£270K (shared funding between University of Bradford and NHS National Innovation Centre)

Start date: 02/01/2013

End date: 02/01/2015

Introduction: The use of imaging techniques such as X-ray, MRI, and endoscopy, has become invaluable in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. These technologies allow clinicians to see things that are either difficult to access, or are invisible to the naked eye, and new methods are constantly being sought to help with more and more medical areas.

Problem:Imaging of the cornea, the convex and transparent front-part of the eye which focuses light onto the retina, was not possible until the development confocal microscopy in the last decade or so. This technique captures high-resolution images of the cornea at different depths, and allows clinicians to diagnose and monitor injuries, dystrophies and diseases in the cornea that can potentially lead to blindness. The technique, while powerful, has been limited in its effectiveness. A single “corneal scan” can generate up to 700 images at different depths, which are often misaligned and blurry because of unavoidable eye-movements during the scanning process. After a scan it can typically take several weeks for the images to be analysed, in a process that is challenging for the clinician.

Project:Efficient 3D Corneal Modelling" project will use tools developed by researchers at the University of Bradford’s Centre for Visual Computing to overcome these problems, and revolutionise the use of confocal microscopy in corneal imaging. Prof. Rami Qahwaji, who leads the medical image processing group, has developed new techniques for the automatic, near-real time, analysis of confocal microscope images that convert the many 2D images into a single high-resolution 3D model. This 3D model is not only easier for the clinician to use, but it can be automatically analysed by computer algorithms to detect signs of early disease that are not visible to the human eye. By performing the analysis in near real-time, the results of the scan would be available to the clinician immediately after the confocal scanning procedure. This means that diagnosis can be made much more quickly, problems could be detected earlier, and the right treatments administered before serious disease develops.

Impact:The new technology is hoped to have two immediate effects: firstly by making the scanning process more accessible, it is hoped that more will be performed as part of routine assessment procedures, thus increasing the quality of patient assessments; secondly it is expected to reduce the necessity for corneal graft operations, which can be necessary when diseases have progressed too far. Reducing the need for graft operations will both benefit the patient, since the graft operations carry some risk, and will reduce the cost to the to the NHS, where over 2000 corneal grafts are performed every year. In addition the technology aims to make it possible to study the evolution of corneal structures over extended periods, which is important to study response to certain treatments, for example. It will also be used to gain a better understanding of common corneal pathologies, for example inflammation, early stages of corneal graft rejection and microscopic processes that can be sight threatening.

This research is supported by the NHS National Innovation Centre ( http://www.nic.nhs.uk/ ) and the University of Bradford.

Launch of Bradford District Dementia Action Alliance

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The launch of the Bradford District Dementia Action Alliance will take place on 27th June 2013 from 11.30am - 1.00pm at the University of Bradford.

The event will encourage and inform managers about how they can make their organisation more accessible to people living with dementia. Delegates will also be giving the opportunity to join the campaign to make Bradford a dementia friendly district.

The launch will take place at the Norcroft Centre at the University of Bradford between 11am - 1pm, followed by lunch.

For more information please contact Bradford Dementia Group on 01274 233996 and to book a place please click on the DAA Launch Flyer (pdf, 321KB). All bookings must be made by Monday 17th June 2013.

Evaluating Dementia Care and Services Conference

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The UK Evaluation Society Yorkshire and Humber Regional Network in collaboration with the Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford are holding a conference focusing on evaluating dementia care and services from the perspective of people with dementia and their family carers.

The conference will take place on Tuesday 25th June 2013 from 1pm-3.30pm and 4pm - 6pm at Heaton Mount Conference Centre, School of Management.

Session topics will include:

  • voices of people with dementia in randomised controlled studies
  • analysing narratives of the service user experience in residential care and day services
  • designing an evaluation study to include the perspectives of people with dementia
  • evaluating care from the perspective of family members
  • evaluating dementia care provided within personal relationships
  • using visual methods to access the perspective of family carers during sensitive times of transition

Davida Fortinsky award for Postgraduate Dementia Studies July 2013

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This years Davida Fortinsky award for outstanding postgraduate Dementia Studies is awarded to Caroline Hampson

Davida Fortinsky was the mother of Richard Fortinsky, a Fulbright Scholar from the United States who spent five months in 2007 with the Bradford Dementia Group learning about how dementia care is organized in primary care and mental health trusts in England. After a full and active life, Davida passed away in February 2007 from complications associated with advanced dementia.

Davida instilled in her sons, Richard and James, and ultimately her three grandchildren, Kyle, Laura and Celia, a deep thirst for knowledge and love for learning from an early age. She was an unwavering source of support and fully engaged in their lives. Thanks primarily to her continuous positive messages about the value of higher education, all of her descendants have completed or are enrolled in university degree programs.

The Davida Fortinsky Award for Outstanding Dementia Studies Student at the University of Bradford celebrates Davida’s life by carrying on the tradition of encouraging the pursuit of knowledge, in this case to help improve the quality of lives of people with dementia and their families, wherever in the world they may live.

This year's award goes to Caroline Hampson who achieved a MSc in Dementia Studies with merit, having had her first child during the second year of the course and completing her final year dissertation whilst expecting her second baby. The School of Health Studies thinks that this is an excellent example of the kind of multi-tasking a lot of our part time students excel in.

Below is a statement from Caroline:

'I have worked in the NHS as an occupational therapist since 1999, and have spent the past 11 years working in the specialism of dementia care. I currently hold the post of Clinical Specialist Occupational Therapist in East Lancashire, working with a dedicated team to provide diagnosis and treatment to people with dementia. I began the MSc in Dementia Studies in 2010, enrolling on the distance learning course. I felt that engaging in this programme of study would help me to increase my knowledge of dementia, explore ways of improving dementia services, and to better understand the experience of a person with dementia. In turn, this would inform my practice as an occupational therapist, help me to develop services locally, and to share this knowledge with my colleagues in the dementia setting.

The MSc programme was a challenging but fulfilling experience. The challenge was increased somewhat by the arrival of my daughter during my second year of study, which made finding the time for study much more difficult. However, after a few months break from study, I felt able to return to my study. Support from my family, colleagues, and my project supervisor was essential in enabling me to continue with the MSc, especially when carrying out the final year dissertation project. In addition to this, I had a steely determination to complete the programme before my second daughter was due to be born – just a few months after the submission date! Although studying was made a little more complicated by the arrival of my family, it was certainly a very worthwhile and rewarding experience.

New Staff Member with Bradford Dementia Group

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Dr Danielle Jones has joined the team as a Lecturer in Dementia Studies.

Danielle will be delivering modules on the BSc and MSc Dementia Studies programs, as well as contributing to the division’s research portfolio.

She has a background in Sociology and Social Research methods, predominantly using Conversation Analysis as a methodology to examine the implications dementia has for family communication and relationships.

Danielle is also involved in a clinical research study into dementia, working with collaborators from the department of Neurology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield and researchers at Loughborough University. They are investigating how interactional features of patient’s presenting concerns during their first memory assessment in a memory clinic can be used to differentiate between people who receive a diagnosis of dementia and those with other functional complaints.

New Post Doctoral Research Fellow

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Dr Sahdia Parveen has joined the team as a Post Doctoral Research Fellow.

Dr Parveen will be working with Professor Jan Oyebode. She has a back ground in health psychology with her PhD focusing on the influence of cultural values on illness perceptions, willingness to provide care, coping, use of support and quality of life. More recently she has been involved with various research projects focused on patient safety in health care.

Honorary Graduate - Trevor Jarvis

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Trevor Jarvis was awarded an Honorary degree for his passion and tireless campaigning on behalf of people with dementia and for the improvement of public awareness of dementia.

Trevor gave an inspiring and moving speech at the ceremony and received a standing ovation.


Trevor is a passionate and tireless campaigner on behalf of people with dementia care, and for the improvement of public awareness of dementia. He has provided long-standing service to the University's Division of Dementia Studies as well as serving as an ambassador to several leading mental health charities.

Please see below his graduation video and speech.

New Trainer in Person-Centred Dementia Care

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Mrs. Carol Benabda has joined the team as a Trainer in Person Centered Dementia Care.

Carol will be facilitating person first courses and will also be undertaking an apprenticeship to become a trainer in dementia care mapping.

Carol has a background in social care having experience from a wide variety of settings such as short term, day services, rehabilitation, residential and high dependency care for older people with dementia, people with learning disabilities and mental health issues.

Carol has worked in private, local authority and registered charity organisations and has been working more recently as a trainer for Health & Social Care workers.

Bradford Dementia Group Awarded Funding Grant from Department of Health

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Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford have been awarded over £60,000 from the Department of Health to support the delivery and development of a Postgraduate Course for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia.

Members of Bradford Dementia Group successfully submitted a bid for funding, from the Department of Health who are particularly keen to award funding to projects that focussed on areas of dementia workforce development, which had previously not been funded and identified as national priorities.

The funding will support the tuition fees for fifteen students on the Postgraduate Certificate for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia for the next academic year, in addition to an evaluation of the impact of the services students provide for patients and their families. This innovative new programme run by Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford, directly addresses government priorities for early diagnosis and support for people with dementia.

The programme is aimed at students from a variety of clinical backgrounds working in health care settings, where diagnostic services and on-going support for people with dementia care are currently or are planned to be provided. The course will enable them to develop high level skills in assessment, diagnosis and on-going support for people with dementia and their carers.

GPs, Practice Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Nurse Consultants and staff working in Memory Assessment Services from three Clinical Commissioning Groups are among those who will benefit from this exciting new programme.

Bradford Dementia Group will also be working with the Clinical Commissioning Groups who engage with this programme to evaluate the impact of the course, which will support continued development, evaluation and dissemination of the programme.

Dr Sarah Smith, Programme Leader for the Post Graduate Certificate for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia, comments, “We are delighted to have been successful with this bid and to be working with the Department of Health and Clinical Commissioning Groups on this prestigious project. We hope that we can continue to develop this programme through working in partnership with Clinical Commissioning Groups to provide better quality diagnosis and ongoing support for people with dementia.”

The Bupa Award for Innovation in Person Centred Care

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The Bupa Award for Innovation in Person Centred Care recognises a University of Bradford Dementia Studies student, who has demonstrated exceptional innovation and creativity in translating their learning into practice, in order to benefit people with dementia, their families or colleagues.

Students completing either the Undergraduate Practice Project or the Postgraduate Understanding Experiences of Dementia modules will be eligible for the award. Student assignments on these modules will be judged for their innovation in translating the student’s learning into practice within their workplace.

The shortlisted candidates will be judged by a panel of Bradford Dementia Group staff including Professor Murna Downs, Chair in Dementia Studies, and Dr Claire Surr, Head of Education Programmes and Bupa staff, including Dr Graham Stokes, Director of Dementia Care and Kirsty Wilson, Programme Manager. The award will presented at the Journal of Dementia Care Annual Congress awards dinner.

The award reflects the ongoing partnership between the University of Bradford and Bupa and our joint commitment to improving the lives of people with dementia and their families through celebrating innovation in person centred care.

Winners

2013 Margaret Ryan

2012 Sarah Meharg

Highly commended: Gregory Payne and Debby Lamont

2011 Jodie Clarke

8th UK Dementia Congress

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Bradford Dementia Group is proud to be the Academic Sponsor of the 8th UK Dementia Congress - a major national conference.

The conference is being held at the East Midlands Conference Centre in Nottingham from the 5-7th November 2013.

Reduced conference rate for students enrolled on our dementia studies courses

If you are a student enrolled on a University of Bradford dementia studies degree course or module you are entitled to a 60% reduction on the conference delegate rate. Please contact Steven Knowles at steven@hawkerpublications.com or 020 7720 2108 ext. 214.

Come and visit our stand or join us at one of our sessions:

Wednesday 6th November

8.30 – 9.15 Early Bird Session on ‘Participatory video in long-term care for people with dementia’ by Dr Andrea Capstick.

11.30 – 12.40, Parallel Sessions on Changing the Culture of Care

- ‘Transforming the quality of care within patient services’ by Paul Edwards and Maria Scurfield-Walton with Aileen Beatty and Jill Common from Northumbria Healthcare NHS Trust.

- ‘A multi component intervention to achieve and embed culture change in care homes’ by Tanya Little with Emma Hanson, Head of Strategic Planning, Kent County Council.

14.40 – 15.50, Parallel Sessions on Staff Development

- ‘Workforce development in a tough economic climate’ by Jo Crossland with Claire Tester, Rotherham Council.

- ‘Developing nurses to lead change in person-centred dementia care’ by Paul Edwards with Bridget Turner, Nightingale Hammerson.

- ‘Effective learning through online and distance approaches’ by Dr Sarah Jane Smith, Jo Crossland and Dr Claire Surr.

14.40 – 15.50, Parallel Sessions Question Time Panel

Paul Edwards will be on the Question Time Panel during the day’s final Parallel Sessions.

Thursday 7th November

09.15 – 10.25, Parallel Sessions on Quality of Life in Care Homes

- ‘Tuneable lighting replicating natural daylight’ by Dr Louise Johnson and Dr Claire Surr.

- Symposium on Fronto-temporal dementia. Professor Jan Oyebode will chair this symposium on considering ways in which person and family-centred practice is possible in fronto-temporal dementias.

11.00 – 11.50, Plenary Session on Facing a Better Future.

Paul Edwards will chair this session about how we deal with the darker side of care culture.

12.00 – 13.10 Parallel Session on Care Homes and Hospital Admissions

Professor Murna Downs will chair this session on reducing avoidable hospital admissions from care homes.


We will also be displaying the following posters about our work:

‘Designing a data warehouse for Dementia Care Mapping (DCM): a doctoral study’ by Shehla Khalid.

‘The Essentials workbook for family and friends’ by Jan Robins.

‘A theoretical evidence base for object based reminiscence work with older adults’ by Rosemary Bradley and Dr Sarah Jane Smith

Further details about the conference are available Dementia Congress (external link)

Researchers receive grant to improve Dementia care in care homes

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Researchers from the Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford, have received £2.4 million of funding from the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme to conduct a four year national study looking at how the quality of care for people with dementia in care homes can be improved.

Led by Dr Claire Surr, the research team comprises of Professor Murna Downs and Mr Paul Edwards from the University of Bradford as well as leading academics from Kings College London, University of Leeds, Newcastle University and the University of Technology Sydney. The research also includes experts from Oxfordshire Health NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford District Care Trust, Bupa and the Alzheimer’s Society.

The study, known as DCM-EPIC, will involve 750 people with dementia and care staff in 50 care homes across the North of England, London and Oxfordshire. The aim is to investigate whether Dementia Care Mapping™ (DCM), a technique developed at the University of Bradford, is effective in helping care home staff to deliver better quality care to people with dementia.

Dr Claire Surr, Reader in Dementia Studies at the University of Bradford, said: “We are delighted to be supported by the NIHR HTA programme to undertake this research. This study will provide us with strong evidence about how we can ensure people living with dementia get better quality care in care homes.

Care home staff need to know the best available approaches to support people living with dementia. This research will tell us if the Dementia Care Mapping™ tool is an effective way to equip staff with the skills they need to deliver good quality care for residents.”

Dr Pam Bagley, Dean of the School of Health Studies at the University of Bradford, added: “This is a prestigious project which will contribute to our understanding of how to provide good quality dementia care. The fact that the team from the University of Bradford have been joined by such highly acclaimed national and international academics and experts in conducting this research demonstrates its importance to the field.”

The research, which is to commence immediately, is due to complete in September 2017.

Honorary Bradford Graduate Trevor Jarvis campaigns to make banks dementia friendly

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Honorary Bradford Graduate Trevor Jarvis has been working with banks to make things easier for people with dementia to manage their finances.

Trevor had problems remembering pin numbers so fought hard to be able to have a signature card so he doesn’t have to use a pin number. He has campaigned for people with dementia to be given more flexibility by banks about how they access their money. Trevor campaigned for more understanding about the needs of people with dementia from bank staff and more prominence of the ability to have signature only cards for shop workers.

BBC News Article

Trevor Jarvis was made a Doctor of Education, receiving an honorary degree for his long-standing work to raise public awareness of dementia. He has provided a long-standing service to the University's Division of Dementia Studies, as well as serving as an ambasador to several leading mental health charities.

Trevor Jarvis was made an honorary University of Bradford Graduate 2013 - read more.

BME dementia awareness road shows 2013

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There are currently 15, 000 people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups living with dementia in the UK, and this number is set to increase. Research shows that there is a lack of awareness of dementia amongst BME communities. Raising awareness is an important first step to improve access to services for people from a BME background.

The Bradford Dementia Group (BDG) is proud to be working in partnership with Bradford and District Older People Alliance (BOPA), Bradford District Council, Meri Yaadain, Phase 3, Mary Seacole Court, Adult and community services and Sharing Voices, to deliver 5 community engagement road shows to raise awareness.

The main aim of the road shows is to promote awareness and reduce stigma in BME communities and encourage people to seek help and support as early as possible. The programme includes a presentation by Jan Oyebode, Professor of Dementia Care, BDG on the nature of dementia and “how to live well with dementia”. So far we have presented road shows to: Indian, African and Caribbean, and Central and Eastern European communities and we will be running one for Irish communities in the New Year. The events so far have been well attended and the content well received.

For further information please contact Carol Peltier (BOPA Development Manager) BOPA@ageukbradfordanddistrict.org.uk

Nursing Times Award, Nursing in the Community category 2013

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A specialist behavioural support service has been developed to support staff in residential and nursing homes to care for people with dementia who display behaviour that staff perceive as "challenging". The aim is to avoid the use of psychotropic medication in line with current government guidelines and to educate staff in relation to best practice in this area. We also use a cognitive behavioural model to work with staff to reframe "problem behaviour" into 'needs' that can be met. We work on the assumption that behaviour that staff find challenging is due to an unmet need, and that it is our challenge to ensure we do everything possible to meet that need. We promote psychosocial interventions and one of the main purposes of the introduction of the new service was to reduce admission to hospital psychiatric in-patient wards and moving the person unnecessarily. We aim to reduce the distress of people with dementia and maximise their potential to lead as fulfilling a life as possible. A key message is that with the right care and support people can "live well" with dementia. Allowing people with dementia to remain distressed and failing to meet needs also leads to situations that can be unsafe but also very undignified for the individual concerned.

MSc in Dementia Studies student invited to speak at Dementia Conference

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MSc in Dementia Studies student, Nicky Taylor, spoke at the Arts 4 Dementia Best Practice Seminar at Sadlers Wells on 8 November to highlight the use of drama approaches to engage people living with dementia.

The event encouraged arts organisations to share experience of dementia practice in music, drama, dance and art, in order to inspire other cultural institutions to develop their offer for people living with dementia.

The drama debate was chaired by Pam Schweitzer of European Reminiscence Network. Nicky represented West Yorkshire Playhouse, where she leads programmes of creative work for older people and people living with dementia and their partners. She uses story making, puppetry, songwriting, poetry and visual arts to explore participants' talents and experiences. Exploring the world of a producing theatre is key in all projects with time spent backstage to see sets, props and costumes being made, and meeting technical staff and actors.

Amongst others represented on the drama panel were Turtle Key Arts and Central School of Speech and Drama, whose Applied Theatre students have been training to lead sessions for people with dementia.

Other presentations included research by neuroscientist, Dr Camilla Clark, into connections between music and brain function in frontotemporal dementia, with keynote speeches from Baroness Greengross OBE and Harry Cayton OBE.

http://www.arts4dementia.org.uk/News/a4d-best-practice-seminar-at-sadlers-wells

New PhD student joins Bradford Dementia Group

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We are delighted to welcome to the Bradford Dementia Group™ our new PhD student, Kirsty Haunch. Kirsty has been appointed to the BUPA funded PhD studentship in end of life care for people with dementia in care homes. Her work will be supervised by Professors Jan Oyebode and Murna Downs. Kirsty Haunch joins us from having been Research Coordinator for the North East Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire Comprehensive Local Research Network. (NEYNL CLRN). She is currently completing an MSc in Health Sciences from the University of York.

Having recently launched the national Enabling Research in Care Homes (ENRICH) project for the network, she is now very keen to write her own research. Her interests are in dementia research and she looks to explore end of life care for people with dementia in care homes. She is both enthusiastic and motivated looking forward to becoming part of the team.

Experts by Experience Take Part in Teaching Dementia Studies

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We were delighted to welcome to the University members of our ¿expert by experience¿ panel who took part in teaching and assessing students on the module Dementia training: skills and approaches on 10th and 11th May 2012.

Trevor Jarvis who has vascular dementia, his wife Ann, Dennis Jubb who has fronto-temporal dementia, and former carers Bob Dunnett and Mollie Peet, all took part in assessing students’ teaching presentations. Trevor also delivered an inspiring talk on his experience of living with dementia, and Dennis told us about work done by the PROP (People Relying on People) group he set up in Doncaster and showed a video made by the members.

Many thanks to Trevor, Ann, Dennis, Bob and Mollie for contributing so much to this event.

Bay Tree Voices Film Project

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Over the summer of 2011, Dementia Studies lecturer Andrea Capstick visited Bay Tree Resource Centre in Moor Allerton, Leeds, in order to involve people with more severe dementia in the education we provide.

A number of interactions were recorded on film with resource centre clients including Shahida, Cath, Tom, Cyril, Shirley and Brian. These film clips have now been incorporated into some of the Dementia Studies modules and are currently being evaluated by students.

This is an important aspect of our Patient and Public Involvement work, and we are grateful to everyone at Bay Tree for their support with it. Terry Wilford, a BSc Dementia Studies student who works at Bay Tree has written about the project on the University’s Community Engagement website.

Launch of Bradford District Dementia Action Alliance

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The launch of the Bradford District Dementia Action Alliance will take place on 27th June 2013 from 11.30am - 1.00pm at the University of Bradford.

The event will encourage and inform managers about how they can make their organisation more accessible to people living with dementia. Delegates will also be giving the opportunity to join the campaign to make Bradford a dementia friendly district.

The launch will take place at the Norcroft Centre at the University of Bradford between 11am - 1pm, followed by lunch.

For more information please contact Bradford Dementia Group on 01274 233996 and to book a place please click on the DAA Launch Flyer (pdf, 321KB). All bookings must be made by Monday 17th June 2013.

Evaluating Dementia Care and Services Conference

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The UK Evaluation Society Yorkshire and Humber Regional Network in collaboration with the Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford are holding a conference focusing on evaluating dementia care and services from the perspective of people with dementia and their family carers.

The conference will take place on Tuesday 25th June 2013 from 1pm-3.30pm and 4pm - 6pm at Heaton Mount Conference Centre, School of Management.

Session topics will include:

  • voices of people with dementia in randomised controlled studies
  • analysing narratives of the service user experience in residential care and day services
  • designing an evaluation study to include the perspectives of people with dementia
  • evaluating care from the perspective of family members
  • evaluating dementia care provided within personal relationships
  • using visual methods to access the perspective of family carers during sensitive times of transition

Davida Fortinsky award for Postgraduate Dementia Studies July 2013

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This years Davida Fortinsky award for outstanding postgraduate Dementia Studies is awarded to Caroline Hampson

Davida Fortinsky was the mother of Richard Fortinsky, a Fulbright Scholar from the United States who spent five months in 2007 with the Bradford Dementia Group learning about how dementia care is organized in primary care and mental health trusts in England. After a full and active life, Davida passed away in February 2007 from complications associated with advanced dementia.

Davida instilled in her sons, Richard and James, and ultimately her three grandchildren, Kyle, Laura and Celia, a deep thirst for knowledge and love for learning from an early age. She was an unwavering source of support and fully engaged in their lives. Thanks primarily to her continuous positive messages about the value of higher education, all of her descendants have completed or are enrolled in university degree programs.

The Davida Fortinsky Award for Outstanding Dementia Studies Student at the University of Bradford celebrates Davida’s life by carrying on the tradition of encouraging the pursuit of knowledge, in this case to help improve the quality of lives of people with dementia and their families, wherever in the world they may live.

This year's award goes to Caroline Hampson who achieved a MSc in Dementia Studies with merit, having had her first child during the second year of the course and completing her final year dissertation whilst expecting her second baby. The School of Health Studies thinks that this is an excellent example of the kind of multi-tasking a lot of our part time students excel in.

Below is a statement from Caroline:

'I have worked in the NHS as an occupational therapist since 1999, and have spent the past 11 years working in the specialism of dementia care. I currently hold the post of Clinical Specialist Occupational Therapist in East Lancashire, working with a dedicated team to provide diagnosis and treatment to people with dementia. I began the MSc in Dementia Studies in 2010, enrolling on the distance learning course. I felt that engaging in this programme of study would help me to increase my knowledge of dementia, explore ways of improving dementia services, and to better understand the experience of a person with dementia. In turn, this would inform my practice as an occupational therapist, help me to develop services locally, and to share this knowledge with my colleagues in the dementia setting.

The MSc programme was a challenging but fulfilling experience. The challenge was increased somewhat by the arrival of my daughter during my second year of study, which made finding the time for study much more difficult. However, after a few months break from study, I felt able to return to my study. Support from my family, colleagues, and my project supervisor was essential in enabling me to continue with the MSc, especially when carrying out the final year dissertation project. In addition to this, I had a steely determination to complete the programme before my second daughter was due to be born – just a few months after the submission date! Although studying was made a little more complicated by the arrival of my family, it was certainly a very worthwhile and rewarding experience.

8th UK Dementia Congress

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Bradford Dementia Group is proud to be the Academic Sponsor of the 8th UK Dementia Congress - a major national conference.

The conference is being held at the East Midlands Conference Centre in Nottingham from the 5-7th November 2013.

Reduced conference rate for students enrolled on our dementia studies courses

If you are a student enrolled on a University of Bradford dementia studies degree course or module you are entitled to a 60% reduction on the conference delegate rate. Please contact Steven Knowles at steven@hawkerpublications.com or 020 7720 2108 ext. 214.

Come and visit our stand or join us at one of our sessions:

Wednesday 6th November

8.30 – 9.15 Early Bird Session on ‘Participatory video in long-term care for people with dementia’ by Dr Andrea Capstick.

11.30 – 12.40, Parallel Sessions on Changing the Culture of Care

- ‘Transforming the quality of care within patient services’ by Paul Edwards and Maria Scurfield-Walton with Aileen Beatty and Jill Common from Northumbria Healthcare NHS Trust.

- ‘A multi component intervention to achieve and embed culture change in care homes’ by Tanya Little with Emma Hanson, Head of Strategic Planning, Kent County Council.

14.40 – 15.50, Parallel Sessions on Staff Development

- ‘Workforce development in a tough economic climate’ by Jo Crossland with Claire Tester, Rotherham Council.

- ‘Developing nurses to lead change in person-centred dementia care’ by Paul Edwards with Bridget Turner, Nightingale Hammerson.

- ‘Effective learning through online and distance approaches’ by Dr Sarah Jane Smith, Jo Crossland and Dr Claire Surr.

14.40 – 15.50, Parallel Sessions Question Time Panel

Paul Edwards will be on the Question Time Panel during the day’s final Parallel Sessions.

Thursday 7th November

09.15 – 10.25, Parallel Sessions on Quality of Life in Care Homes

- ‘Tuneable lighting replicating natural daylight’ by Dr Louise Johnson and Dr Claire Surr.

- Symposium on Fronto-temporal dementia. Professor Jan Oyebode will chair this symposium on considering ways in which person and family-centred practice is possible in fronto-temporal dementias.

11.00 – 11.50, Plenary Session on Facing a Better Future.

Paul Edwards will chair this session about how we deal with the darker side of care culture.

12.00 – 13.10 Parallel Session on Care Homes and Hospital Admissions

Professor Murna Downs will chair this session on reducing avoidable hospital admissions from care homes.


We will also be displaying the following posters about our work:

‘Designing a data warehouse for Dementia Care Mapping (DCM): a doctoral study’ by Shehla Khalid.

‘The Essentials workbook for family and friends’ by Jan Robins.

‘A theoretical evidence base for object based reminiscence work with older adults’ by Rosemary Bradley and Dr Sarah Jane Smith

Further details about the conference are available Dementia Congress (external link)

Bradford Dementia Group Awarded Funding Grant from Department of Health

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Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford have been awarded over £60,000 from the Department of Health to support the delivery and development of a Postgraduate Course for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia.

Members of Bradford Dementia Group successfully submitted a bid for funding, from the Department of Health who are particularly keen to award funding to projects that focussed on areas of dementia workforce development, which had previously not been funded and identified as national priorities.

The funding will support the tuition fees for fifteen students on the Postgraduate Certificate for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia for the next academic year, in addition to an evaluation of the impact of the services students provide for patients and their families. This innovative new programme run by Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford, directly addresses government priorities for early diagnosis and support for people with dementia.

The programme is aimed at students from a variety of clinical backgrounds working in health care settings, where diagnostic services and on-going support for people with dementia care are currently or are planned to be provided. The course will enable them to develop high level skills in assessment, diagnosis and on-going support for people with dementia and their carers.

GPs, Practice Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Nurse Consultants and staff working in Memory Assessment Services from three Clinical Commissioning Groups are among those who will benefit from this exciting new programme.

Bradford Dementia Group will also be working with the Clinical Commissioning Groups who engage with this programme to evaluate the impact of the course, which will support continued development, evaluation and dissemination of the programme.

Dr Sarah Smith, Programme Leader for the Post Graduate Certificate for Practitioners with a Special Interest in Dementia, comments, “We are delighted to have been successful with this bid and to be working with the Department of Health and Clinical Commissioning Groups on this prestigious project. We hope that we can continue to develop this programme through working in partnership with Clinical Commissioning Groups to provide better quality diagnosis and ongoing support for people with dementia.”

New Trainer in Person-Centred Dementia Care

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Mrs. Carol Benabda has joined the team as a Trainer in Person Centered Dementia Care.

Carol will be facilitating person first courses and will also be undertaking an apprenticeship to become a trainer in dementia care mapping.

Carol has a background in social care having experience from a wide variety of settings such as short term, day services, rehabilitation, residential and high dependency care for older people with dementia, people with learning disabilities and mental health issues.

Carol has worked in private, local authority and registered charity organisations and has been working more recently as a trainer for Health & Social Care workers.

New Staff Member with Bradford Dementia Group

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Dr Danielle Jones has joined the team as a Lecturer in Dementia Studies.

Danielle will be delivering modules on the BSc and MSc Dementia Studies programs, as well as contributing to the division’s research portfolio.

She has a background in Sociology and Social Research methods, predominantly using Conversation Analysis as a methodology to examine the implications dementia has for family communication and relationships.

Danielle is also involved in a clinical research study into dementia, working with collaborators from the department of Neurology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield and researchers at Loughborough University. They are investigating how interactional features of patient’s presenting concerns during their first memory assessment in a memory clinic can be used to differentiate between people who receive a diagnosis of dementia and those with other functional complaints.

New Post Doctoral Research Fellow

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Dr Sahdia Parveen has joined the team as a Post Doctoral Research Fellow.

Dr Parveen will be working with Professor Jan Oyebode. She has a back ground in health psychology with her PhD focusing on the influence of cultural values on illness perceptions, willingness to provide care, coping, use of support and quality of life. More recently she has been involved with various research projects focused on patient safety in health care.

Honorary Graduate - Trevor Jarvis

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Trevor Jarvis was awarded an Honorary degree for his passion and tireless campaigning on behalf of people with dementia and for the improvement of public awareness of dementia.

Trevor gave an inspiring and moving speech at the ceremony and received a standing ovation.


Trevor is a passionate and tireless campaigner on behalf of people with dementia care, and for the improvement of public awareness of dementia. He has provided long-standing service to the University's Division of Dementia Studies as well as serving as an ambassador to several leading mental health charities.

Please see below his graduation video and speech.

Researchers receive grant to improve Dementia care in care homes

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Researchers from the Bradford Dementia Group, University of Bradford, have received £2.4 million of funding from the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme to conduct a four year national study looking at how the quality of care for people with dementia in care homes can be improved.

Led by Dr Claire Surr, the research team comprises of Professor Murna Downs and Mr Paul Edwards from the University of Bradford as well as leading academics from Kings College London, University of Leeds, Newcastle University and the University of Technology Sydney. The research also includes experts from Oxfordshire Health NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford District Care Trust, Bupa and the Alzheimer’s Society.

The study, known as DCM-EPIC, will involve 750 people with dementia and care staff in 50 care homes across the North of England, London and Oxfordshire. The aim is to investigate whether Dementia Care Mapping™ (DCM), a technique developed at the University of Bradford, is effective in helping care home staff to deliver better quality care to people with dementia.

Dr Claire Surr, Reader in Dementia Studies at the University of Bradford, said: “We are delighted to be supported by the NIHR HTA programme to undertake this research. This study will provide us with strong evidence about how we can ensure people living with dementia get better quality care in care homes.

Care home staff need to know the best available approaches to support people living with dementia. This research will tell us if the Dementia Care Mapping™ tool is an effective way to equip staff with the skills they need to deliver good quality care for residents.”

Dr Pam Bagley, Dean of the School of Health Studies at the University of Bradford, added: “This is a prestigious project which will contribute to our understanding of how to provide good quality dementia care. The fact that the team from the University of Bradford have been joined by such highly acclaimed national and international academics and experts in conducting this research demonstrates its importance to the field.”

The research, which is to commence immediately, is due to complete in September 2017.

The Bupa Award for Innovation in Person Centred Care

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The Bupa Award for Innovation in Person Centred Care recognises a University of Bradford Dementia Studies student, who has demonstrated exceptional innovation and creativity in translating their learning into practice, in order to benefit people with dementia, their families or colleagues.

Students completing either the Undergraduate Practice Project or the Postgraduate Understanding Experiences of Dementia modules will be eligible for the award. Student assignments on these modules will be judged for their innovation in translating the student’s learning into practice within their workplace.

The shortlisted candidates will be judged by a panel of Bradford Dementia Group staff including Professor Murna Downs, Chair in Dementia Studies, and Dr Claire Surr, Head of Education Programmes and Bupa staff, including Dr Graham Stokes, Director of Dementia Care and Kirsty Wilson, Programme Manager. The award will presented at the Journal of Dementia Care Annual Congress awards dinner.

The award reflects the ongoing partnership between the University of Bradford and Bupa and our joint commitment to improving the lives of people with dementia and their families through celebrating innovation in person centred care.

Winners

2013 Margaret Ryan

2012 Sarah Meharg

Highly commended: Gregory Payne and Debby Lamont

2011 Jodie Clarke

Honorary Bradford Graduate Trevor Jarvis campaigns to make banks dementia friendly

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Honorary Bradford Graduate Trevor Jarvis has been working with banks to make things easier for people with dementia to manage their finances.

Trevor had problems remembering pin numbers so fought hard to be able to have a signature card so he doesn’t have to use a pin number. He has campaigned for people with dementia to be given more flexibility by banks about how they access their money. Trevor campaigned for more understanding about the needs of people with dementia from bank staff and more prominence of the ability to have signature only cards for shop workers.

BBC News Article

Trevor Jarvis was made a Doctor of Education, receiving an honorary degree for his long-standing work to raise public awareness of dementia. He has provided a long-standing service to the University's Division of Dementia Studies, as well as serving as an ambasador to several leading mental health charities.

Trevor Jarvis was made an honorary University of Bradford Graduate 2013 - read more.

BME dementia awareness road shows 2013

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There are currently 15, 000 people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups living with dementia in the UK, and this number is set to increase. Research shows that there is a lack of awareness of dementia amongst BME communities. Raising awareness is an important first step to improve access to services for people from a BME background.

The Bradford Dementia Group (BDG) is proud to be working in partnership with Bradford and District Older People Alliance (BOPA), Bradford District Council, Meri Yaadain, Phase 3, Mary Seacole Court, Adult and community services and Sharing Voices, to deliver 5 community engagement road shows to raise awareness.

The main aim of the road shows is to promote awareness and reduce stigma in BME communities and encourage people to seek help and support as early as possible. The programme includes a presentation by Jan Oyebode, Professor of Dementia Care, BDG on the nature of dementia and “how to live well with dementia”. So far we have presented road shows to: Indian, African and Caribbean, and Central and Eastern European communities and we will be running one for Irish communities in the New Year. The events so far have been well attended and the content well received.

For further information please contact Carol Peltier (BOPA Development Manager) BOPA@ageukbradfordanddistrict.org.uk

Nursing Times Award, Nursing in the Community category 2013

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A specialist behavioural support service has been developed to support staff in residential and nursing homes to care for people with dementia who display behaviour that staff perceive as "challenging". The aim is to avoid the use of psychotropic medication in line with current government guidelines and to educate staff in relation to best practice in this area. We also use a cognitive behavioural model to work with staff to reframe "problem behaviour" into 'needs' that can be met. We work on the assumption that behaviour that staff find challenging is due to an unmet need, and that it is our challenge to ensure we do everything possible to meet that need. We promote psychosocial interventions and one of the main purposes of the introduction of the new service was to reduce admission to hospital psychiatric in-patient wards and moving the person unnecessarily. We aim to reduce the distress of people with dementia and maximise their potential to lead as fulfilling a life as possible. A key message is that with the right care and support people can "live well" with dementia. Allowing people with dementia to remain distressed and failing to meet needs also leads to situations that can be unsafe but also very undignified for the individual concerned.

New PhD student joins Bradford Dementia Group

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We are delighted to welcome to the Bradford Dementia Group™ our new PhD student, Kirsty Haunch. Kirsty has been appointed to the BUPA funded PhD studentship in end of life care for people with dementia in care homes. Her work will be supervised by Professors Jan Oyebode and Murna Downs. Kirsty Haunch joins us from having been Research Coordinator for the North East Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire Comprehensive Local Research Network. (NEYNL CLRN). She is currently completing an MSc in Health Sciences from the University of York.

Having recently launched the national Enabling Research in Care Homes (ENRICH) project for the network, she is now very keen to write her own research. Her interests are in dementia research and she looks to explore end of life care for people with dementia in care homes. She is both enthusiastic and motivated looking forward to becoming part of the team.

MSc in Dementia Studies student invited to speak at Dementia Conference

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MSc in Dementia Studies student, Nicky Taylor, spoke at the Arts 4 Dementia Best Practice Seminar at Sadlers Wells on 8 November to highlight the use of drama approaches to engage people living with dementia.

The event encouraged arts organisations to share experience of dementia practice in music, drama, dance and art, in order to inspire other cultural institutions to develop their offer for people living with dementia.

The drama debate was chaired by Pam Schweitzer of European Reminiscence Network. Nicky represented West Yorkshire Playhouse, where she leads programmes of creative work for older people and people living with dementia and their partners. She uses story making, puppetry, songwriting, poetry and visual arts to explore participants' talents and experiences. Exploring the world of a producing theatre is key in all projects with time spent backstage to see sets, props and costumes being made, and meeting technical staff and actors.

Amongst others represented on the drama panel were Turtle Key Arts and Central School of Speech and Drama, whose Applied Theatre students have been training to lead sessions for people with dementia.

Other presentations included research by neuroscientist, Dr Camilla Clark, into connections between music and brain function in frontotemporal dementia, with keynote speeches from Baroness Greengross OBE and Harry Cayton OBE.

http://www.arts4dementia.org.uk/News/a4d-best-practice-seminar-at-sadlers-wells

Bay Tree Voices Film Project

Published:

Over the summer of 2011, Dementia Studies lecturer Andrea Capstick visited Bay Tree Resource Centre in Moor Allerton, Leeds, in order to involve people with more severe dementia in the education we provide.

A number of interactions were recorded on film with resource centre clients including Shahida, Cath, Tom, Cyril, Shirley and Brian. These film clips have now been incorporated into some of the Dementia Studies modules and are currently being evaluated by students.

This is an important aspect of our Patient and Public Involvement work, and we are grateful to everyone at Bay Tree for their support with it. Terry Wilford, a BSc Dementia Studies student who works at Bay Tree has written about the project on the University’s Community Engagement website.

Experts by Experience Take Part in Teaching Dementia Studies

Published:

We were delighted to welcome to the University members of our ¿expert by experience¿ panel who took part in teaching and assessing students on the module Dementia training: skills and approaches on 10th and 11th May 2012.

Trevor Jarvis who has vascular dementia, his wife Ann, Dennis Jubb who has fronto-temporal dementia, and former carers Bob Dunnett and Mollie Peet, all took part in assessing students’ teaching presentations. Trevor also delivered an inspiring talk on his experience of living with dementia, and Dennis told us about work done by the PROP (People Relying on People) group he set up in Doncaster and showed a video made by the members.

Many thanks to Trevor, Ann, Dennis, Bob and Mollie for contributing so much to this event.