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News from 2015

Have you wondered what the 'Green dots' on Campus are for?

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The green dots form a circular one-mile walking/jogging route which runs through the centre of the University called the GreenLine Mile. You can pick up the route outside the Richmond Building and this will take you down through campus towards the Green and on into the centre of Bradford.

The GreenLine Mile in Bradford is part of a national initiative to help people get active.

The Bradford route is the first in the country and will be one of four GreenLines in the district. The route has been designed to be easy to follow, instantly recognisable and generally accessible to everyone.

For more information and the Bradford maps see Bradford Greenline Mile

Health & Safety Week (City Campus)

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The aim of the week is to give staff the advice and practical guidance needed to enable them to take responsibility for their own wellbeing.

Location: Richmond Atrium

Date and Time: Mon 15th – Fri 19th June 2015

Duration: 10am - 2pm

Each day there will be events and tours (that staff can book on to in advance) and in the Richmond Atrium, there will be stands packed with information relating to that days’ topic.

On the Health, Safety and Wellbeing stand you will also be able to put your name down for a convenient time to attend a body stat appointment (15 minutes) on Wednesday with Unique staff or a Lung Function Test (20 minutes) on Thursday with Occupational Health staff.

'Sustain' - Health & Wellbeing Programme Update

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The end of January saw the launch of our Sustain - Health and Wellbeing programme, with an event held in the atrium showcasing all of the services available to you, mainly within the University. Throughout the year we will be advertising a range of wellbeing activities and events which you can get involved in, these will be related to four themes which we will be focusing on throughout the year.

Each quarter will see a different theme and will be as follows:

March - May Physical Activity
June - August Mental Wellbeing
September - November Nutrition
December - February Management & Leadership

Keep up to date with the 'Sustain' - Health & Wellbeing programme by visiting our website regularly for the lowdown on all our News and Events.

Carers Week

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Carers Week takes place on 8th - 12th June and is an annual campaign to raise awareness of caring, highlight the challenges carers face and recognise the contribution they make to families and communities throughout the UK.

To help to raise awareness of the support available for Carers we are collaborating with Carers’ Resource to make sure anyone ‘on campus’ who looks after someone is offered extra support – and knows where to find it. Read the Carers Resource press release to find out more.

As part of Carers Week we have the following organisations occupying the viewpoint stand in front of the glass lift in the Atrium. They will be raising awareness and providing information and support to members of staff and students.

Crossroads Care Airedale & Bradford - Crossroads Care will be occupying the stand on Tuesday 9th June from 11.45am-14.00pm. Crossroads Care was established in 1988. They offer a range of direct care services for carers, those they care for and individuals living alone.

Carers' Resource - Carers' Resource will be occupying the stand on Wednesday 10th June from . A carer is someone who, without payment, provides help and support to a friend, neighbour or relative who could not manage otherwise because of frailty, illness or disability. They may even be juggling paid work with caring responsibilities at home. Carers have a tough job – it can mean unrelenting pressure, little chance to relax and a lot of worry. The system is complicated, and the issue is hidden. Come along to the viewpoint stand on the day to discover what support they can offer you.

Further exhibitors will be visiting the University during Carers Week – look out for our next update.

University of Bradford signs up to the Mindful Employer Charter

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The University has become one of the over 1,300 organisations which have signed up to the Mindful Employer Charter - for Employers who are Positive About Mental Health.

The Charter is about working towards the mindful employer principles – signing up is a commitment to this aspirational approach to mental wellbeing.

As part of our continuing commitment to the mindful employer charter we will be completing a review in two -years time - look out for updates on our progress.

As a member our employees can get access to information and resources to support their wellbeing.

More information is available at Mindful Employer Charter

World Hepatitis Day

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28th July 2015 is World Hepatitis Day 2015

Millions of people across the world now take part to raise awareness about viral hepatitis, and to call for access to treatment, better prevention programs and government action.

To find out more visit World Hepatitis Day

Green Thursdays

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Green Thursdays are a series of weekly activities in term time which are fun and focus on a different sustainability topic each week e.g. energy, waste, travel, nature and water. There will be competitions, campaigns, prizes, etc and also an opportunity to showcase some of the reasons why the University of Bradford is a world leading Eco-Campus.

The group includes members of staff from across campus with a love of sustainability including the Estates and Facilities department, Catering, Sustrans Bike Hub and more!

The group is here to spread the message of sustainable living to students and staff across campus through educational events, based around Green Thursdays!

Wellbeing Week - week commencing 16th November

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The aim of the week is to provide staff and students with the advice and practical guidance required to enable them to take responsibility for their own wellbeing.

Everyone is encouraged to attend and take part in this event – so make sure you save the dates and locations in your diary.

Monday 16th November – Emm Lane Campus, Faculty of Management & Law

Tuesday 17th November – Atrium, Richmond Building

Thursday 19th November – Student Central

Further information coming soon.

Health Calendar

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As part of our health and wellbeing initiative every month we will bring you the important health & wellbeing dates for 2015.

Take a look at our new Health Calendar. You will be able to find out what is happening out in the world of Health & Wellbeing and lend your support to some worthwhile causes or make some changes to improve your own health and wellbeing.

Space To Breathe - Mindfulness Sessions

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Monthly 'Space To Breathe' Mindfulness Sessions

Space to Breath - Monthly FREE Mindfulness sessions offered by the .

This session will provide a monthly Mindfulness or Relaxation practice to help manage stress, improve resilience or just give you the opportunity to find a calm space in your busy working week.

The sessions take place on the last Thursday of the month.

Further information and booking: Space To Breathe

The impact of austerity on Bradford

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Or Poverty, Inequality and Mental Well-being: The Double-Whammy effect. This public lecture by Kate Karban examines the impact of the government's austerity programme on poverty in Bradford with reference to wider issues of health inequalities, particularly mental wellbeing.

A key question will concern the extent to which current policies and responses reinscribe disadvantage creating a ‘double whammy’ effect.

Kate Karban
Kate Karban lectures in the Division of Social Work and Social care and specialises in the research areas of: mental health; interprofessional learning & working; social work and health inequalities; participatory research and evaluation.

What do the social policy proposals of the three main political parties mean?

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This public lecture by Jim Goddard draws on the manifestos of the three main political parties in the UK, along with relevant background documents, to outline the different social policy proposals of each party.

It compares them with each other, with what the parties proposed at the last General Election in 2010 and with what they have been doing since then.

Dr Jim Goddard
lectures in the Division of Sociology and Criminology and specialises in the research areas of social policy, looked after children and the British Welfare State.

Should we be giving aid?

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Recently the UK joined the relatively small number of countries that meet the UN target for developed countries to give 0.7% of GDP in aid. This policy is officially supported by all three main parties although a significant proportion of Conservative MPs disagree with it.

UKIP has argued that the foreign aid budget should be cut substantially while the Green Party have argued to increase aid. This lecture will ask whether we should give aid and if so why? This lecture will examine the relative importance and effectiveness of aid and its future role.

These public lectures consider some of the key election issues for the people of Bradford, the UK and the wider world, with analyses of social policy, economics, foreign policy, austerity and poverty.

Dr David Potts
Head, Bradford Centre for International Development

David Potts is an economist specialising in project appraisal with experience of working in a number of developing countries including six years in Tanzania.

Middle East, Conflict and Security: Foreign Policy challenges of the next government

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This public lecture, by Dr Afshin Shahi on Wednesday 18th March 2015, examined the impact of the foreign policy of the past two governments and assessed the challenges that the next government will face, regardless of who actually wins.

The University of Bradford will be hosting the polling station for Bradford West in the 2015 General Elections and in the lead up to the elections will be holding various public events, including five public lectures by academics from our Faculty. These public lectures consider some of the key election issues for the people of Bradford, the UK and the wider world, with analyses of social policy, economics, foreign policy, austerity and poverty.

Dr Afshin Shahi

lectures in international relations in the Division of Peace Studies, specialising in the research areas of: Middle East politics, political Islam and religious sectarianism.

EU membership: in or out?

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What if Britain left the EU? Is there an alternative? Would it be disastrous or liberating? What trade relationships could the UK forge outside the EU? How would economic and social policy be different? What are the implications for sovereignty and democracy?

This public lecture, from 25th March 2015, by Mark Baimbridge seeks to answer these questions and explores the future options for Britain and its relationship with the European Union.

Dr Mark Baimbridge

lectures in the Division of Economics and specialises in the research areas of European integration - European economic integration, the relationship between Britain and the EU and European political integration; Contemporary labour markets - Labour market flexibility.

Bradford academic appointed equality assessor for premier league

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Social Work lecturer, Elaben Mistry-Jackson has been appointed as one of only seven Equality Assessors for Premier League football clubs. Elaine's role will see her taking responsible for taking Manchester United, Manchester City and Newcastle United through the equality standards that are set by the Premier League

The role of Equality Assessor is newly created by the Premier League in response to a mandatory ruling. Traditionally, issues around equality have been addressed by assigned staff within respective football clubs, but for the first time the Premier League have employed consultant assessors to undertake the work. As an assessor, Elaben will be visiting the nominated clubs to undertake equality impact assessments to ascertain where they are at with provision related to aspects of equality and diversity.

She will then formulate an action plan for the club to implement and make a follow up visit to the club at the end of the season for audit purposes. There are three levels of equality standard clubs can work towards, preliminary, intermediate and advanced, which the assessor would recommend to the panel at the end of the season.

Elaben said: "I’m really excited by this new and exciting challenge. Having a lead in ensuring English football clubs are seen to embrace more inclusiveness and diversity, will not only serve the clubs well but enrich and widen the fan base. This is at the heart of all aspects of equality and diversity. I’m looking forward to going behind the scenes and having the opportunity to see things from the other side! (not off side)"

The Premier League is an English professional league for men's association football clubs. At the top of the English football league system, it is the country's primary football competition. Contested by 20 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the Football League.

The impact of austerity on Bradford

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Or Poverty, Inequality and Mental Well-being: The Double-Whammy effect. This public lecture by Kate Karban examines the impact of the government's austerity programme on poverty in Bradford with reference to wider issues of health inequalities, particularly mental wellbeing.

A key question will concern the extent to which current policies and responses reinscribe disadvantage creating a ‘double whammy’ effect.

Kate Karban
Kate Karban lectures in the Division of Social Work and Social care and specialises in the research areas of: mental health; interprofessional learning & working; social work and health inequalities; participatory research and evaluation.

Keynote Address to the International Society for Theoretical Psychology

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Ian Burkitt was invited to give the keynote address to the International Society for Theoretical Psychology during the Summer.

The conference drew around 300 participants from all over the world interested in different theoretical approaches within psychology and social psychology. In July Ian was also invited to talk at a symposium on 'feeling rules' at the International Society for Research on Emotion in Geneva. He has also recently published an article on 'Relational Agency' in the European Journal of Social Theory.

Prof Ian Burkitt

is based in the division of Sociology and Criminology and researches self and identity in social theory and social psychology; emotions; the body in social theory and theories of agency.

Funding awarded to explore urban public parks

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The University of Bradford has been awarded funding to undertake innovative research into the past and future prospects of urban public parks.

A team led by , University of Bradford, has been awarded a research grant by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The total value of the funding is over £275,000 to support innovative research into the life, times and social order of Victorian public parks.

The team, including Professor Adam Crawford and Dr David Churchill, both of the University of Leeds, will explore the future prospects and lived experiences of city parks as public meeting places, in both the Victorian period and the present day. The project is being supported by and conducted in collaboration with Leeds City Council Parks and Countryside Department.

The project advances the AHRC priority research theme of 'Care for the Future' and its central ambition of 'thinking forward through the past' by investigating the heritage, social purpose, expectations and lived experiences of public parks. The project will contribute to a reinterpretation and reinvigoration of the vision, governance and sustainability of urban parks in cities of the future.

On receiving the award Dr Barker, Lecturer in Sociology from the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “We are delighted that this funding will enable us to conduct this exciting research in collaboration with Leeds City Council. We hope the study will inform and influence public policies and practices at a local, regional and national level on the significance, role and place of urban parks in cities of the future, supporting safe, sustainable and inclusive societies”.

Professor Adam Crawford commented: “By connecting the arts and humanities with the social sciences, this research will allow us to develop new insights into the past, present and future role of public parks as places of social mixing. It will help us use experiences and expectations forged in the past to think through the place and possibilities for urban parks of the future”.

Leeds City Council’s executive member for communities Councillor Debra Coupar said: “We are delighted to be working with a research team led by Dr Barker to explore both the heritage and future prospects for public parks in Leeds. The findings of this research will be invaluable in helping us to assess how the lessons and experiences of the past can play an important part in how we approach our future work in the city’s parks.”

The project aims to have a number of societal impacts, including advancing public understandings of the historical experiences and social role that city parks play (or might play) in communities of the past, the present and the future and, in doing so, contribute to public knowledge about the social and cultural heritage of parks. The project will engage public audiences through a public exhibition and a free-to-access digital collection of photographs of Victorian parks in Leeds.

For more information please contact

What do the social policy proposals of the three main political parties mean?

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This public lecture by Jim Goddard draws on the manifestos of the three main political parties in the UK, along with relevant background documents, to outline the different social policy proposals of each party.

It compares them with each other, with what the parties proposed at the last General Election in 2010 and with what they have been doing since then.

Dr Jim Goddard
lectures in the Division of Sociology and Criminology and specialises in the research areas of social policy, looked after children and the British Welfare State.

British Muslim Politics

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This lecture by Parveen Akhtar on Thursday 30th April 2015, focuses on the electoral strategies of Muslim parliamentarians and aspiring politicians, in particular how they attempt to mobilise both the Muslim and mainstream vote.

Whilst it is the case that political parties have been set up exclusively to represent Muslims, they have had limited electoral impact. The failure of mobilizing the Muslim vote for an Islamic political party in the UK reflects, to a large extent, the lack of a coherent Muslim voice and agenda, but also a desire to work within the British political system.

Dr Parveen Akhtar

Parveen Akhtar lectures in the Division of Sociology and Criminology and specialises in the research areas of political participations, British muslims, minority politics, biraderi, super-diversity and religious mobilisations.

Sociology, Economics and Psychology at Bradford rise up in the university rankings as Bradford climbs 15 places

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The University has leapt fifteen places in the latest Complete University Guide, with sociology, psychology and economics, all subjects in the Faculty of Social Sciences rising up to sixteen places on the league tables.

Sociology has risen sixteen places, up from 74th to 48th position, out of 95 with high levels of student satisfaction, research quality and graduate prospects. Psychology has risen ten places from 82nd to 72nd position out of 114 institutions with high quality of research and graduate prospects. Economics has risen eleven places from 68th to 55th position out of 77 institutions, with very high levels of student satisfaction.

Bradford was one of just a handful to rise by more than 10 places in the Complete University Guide table for 2016. It now stands at joint 62nd out of 126 universities. Last year the university was ranked 77th, which was in turn a rise of six places from the previous year’s placing of 83rd.

The rise reflects the changes and improvements that Bradford is making in partnership with students, to support them in reaching their potential.

Labour candidate hands back the poisoned chalice of Bradford West

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Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology Parveen Akhtar has published an article on The Conversation about the impact of Bradford's labour candidate's resignation.

For the full article click here

Ethiopia's Education Minister visits Faculty of Social and International Studies

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Shiferaw Shigutie Wolassa, Minister of Education for the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia visited the University on January 22. The Minister and his delegation met with Robert Parkin, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research and Knowledge Transfer), Professor Donna Lee, Dean of the Faculty of Social and International Studies and Professor David Francis, Head of Peace Studies.

Ethiopia Minister for Education visits Faculty of Social & International Studies The purpose of the visit was to carry on earlier conversations around peace education and explore wider partnerships with the university including staff exchanges and scholarships. The talks focused on a proposed partnership between the University and the Government of Ethiopia.

One element that was discussed was the role the university will play in the introduction of peace education to the national curriculum, starting at primary school level. Scholarships were also discussed and the role they can play in “training the trainers” through building capacity within the Ethiopian university sector. The visit builds on the honorary doctorate awarded to the Ethiopian Deputy Prime Minister in 2013 and the VC-led corporate visit to Ethiopia in June 2014.

Pictured left to right: Berhanu Kebede, Ambassador of Ethiopia to the United Kingdom, Dean of the Faculty of Social and International Studies at Bradford Donna Lee, Shiferaw Shigutie Wolassa, Minister of Education for the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Ato Shiferaw Shigutie, Head of Peace Studies at Bradford David Francis and Ato Wondwossen Mitku, State Minister for Technical and Vocational

New Development Working Paper Series Launched

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International Development is launching a new Development Working Paper Series for academics, which will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and debate across disciplines

The aim of the series is to be interdisciplinary and articles which discuss current development issues from across the social sciences are welcome, as are articles that have research impacts, including case studies that make a broader contribution to economy and society.

The papers will be published on line and they will be distributed to more than 100 academic and non-academic institutions. The papers will also be held in the Bradford Scholars' repository.

Manuscripts should be sent in the first instance to the Editor (Dr Rashmi Arora: R.Arora6@bradford.ac.uk) for review.

Manuscripts should conform to the house-style, as follows:

  • Manuscripts should be typed double-spaced on one side of paper only, not exceeding 7000 words and the minimum of 4000 words. Papers format should be in Word.
  • A cover paper should give the title of the paper, author’s name and in the case of co-authors, names, affiliation and addresses should be given. Acknowledgments should be footnoted in the footnote section at the end of the paper.
  • The first page of the text should begin with the title (and subtitle, if any), author’s name, followed by a maximum 300 word abstract and 3-6 keywords.
  • Tables and footnotes should be supplied on separate sheets, grouped at the end of the text, after the references. Each table should be numbered and titled, and relevant to the text. Footnotes should be avoided where possible, and if used they should be numbered consecutively.
  • Citations should follow the Harvard System.

If you have any questions, please contact r.arora6@bradford.ac.uk

Centre for International Development ranked as one of the top in the world

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The Centre for International Development has again been ranked as one of the top in the World according to the latest QS World University Rankings. The annual QS World University Rankings by Subject is a comprehensive guide to a range of popular subject areas. The rankings series reveals the top 200 universities in the world for 36 individual subjects.

The expert opinion of 85,062 academics and 41,910 employers informed the results, alongside the analysis of 17.3 million research papers and over 100 million citations. Over 3,500 universities were evaluated.

Whilst the QS Rankings regard any course in the top 200 as world leading, Bradford's Development Studies has been ranked within the top 100 this year, cementing its position as one of the best places to study this subject.

Head of Bradford's Centre for International Development (BCID) David Potts said: "We are delighted to be included in the top 100 universities for development studies. The current Bradford Centre for International Development was originally established in 1969 as the Project Planning Centre for Developing Countries and has been recognised for many years as a leading international centre for the study of project planning and management in a development context.

"This expertise is reflected in the postgraduate training provided to some of the world’s major development banks including the African Development Bank, the China Development Bank and the Caribbean Development Bank as well as the governments of many different countries. The Centre has since expanded its area of expertise into wider development issues including economics, finance and public policy and administration and we continue to recruit students from all over the world.

"BCID alumni can be found in the majority of the countries of the world and many of our alumni have risen to senior positions as can be seen from the alumni section of our website. BCID staff have work experience in a wide range of countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe and their research is reflected in a range of books, journal articles and research papers. Recent surveys of student satisfaction have been strongly positive and in the recent PTES survey 97% of our students indicated that they would recommend us as a place to study."

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “The University of Bradford is very proud of the high-quality of our courses. These ranking results place Bradford alongside the very best universities in the world, and I’m delighted and proud that our courses have been recognised in this way."

Pharmacy and Pharmacology at the University of Bradford have also been featured in this year's top 200 for the third year in a row. For more information on the rankings visit www.topuniversities.com

Sierra Leone Police delegation visit University of Bradford

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A Sierra Leone Police delegation (SILEA) visited the Faculty of Social Sciences last week to explore the feasibility of capacity building support for the new Sierra Leone International Law Enforcement Academy (SILEA). SILEA is a donor-funded project supported by the Government of Sierra Leone. SILEA is developed as the first regional international law enforcement academy in West Africa.

The aim of the visit was to consult with University of Bradford through JEFCAS/Peace Studies, as a leading academic institution that has long standing collaboration with the Sierra Leone Police. This historical collaboration was a result of the contacts made by DFID following the war in Sierra Leone. At the time, the DFID Secretary of State, Chair Short, on the advice on the President of Sierra Leone Ahmad Tejan Kabba, contacted Peace Studies requesting for capacity building support for key institutions in Sierra Leone for Education for Peace. Through DFID funding, the Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police became the mentor for the Inspector General of Police in Sierra Leone

The aim of the visit was thus to rebuild the strategic collaboration and partnership that previously existed.

The visit consisted of Inspector General – Mr. Francis Alieu Munu who was appointed to his post on Friday 20th August 2010. Mr. Francis Munu contributed immensely to the post war stability of Sierra Leone by leading the Community Arms Collection and Destruction Exercise. He had also contributed to the restoration of civil authority throughout Sierra Leone and in the Security Sector Reform Process and Policy Formulation.

He was accompanied by Dr. Mohamed Yamba Bangura – an academic and the Principal of Sierra Leone Civil Service Training College who is a consultant in Training, Education and Development. M.Y.Bangura holds a Doctorate degree in Management, Executive Masters in Business Administration, Masters in Development studies, B.Sc Honours in Sociology, Diploma in Higher English and a Teachers Certificate. Also accompanying the IG was Mr. Titus Boye Thompson the Sierra Leone Police Media Consultant.

21st Bradford Development Lecture: Transforming Economies

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Transforming economies through productive development policies: lecture by ILO Assistant Director General: Dr José Manuel Salazar-Xirinachs

- written by .

In our 20th lecture of the prestigious Bradford Development Lecture series, Ha-Joon Chang argued for a development discourse that takes production into the centre of development thought and practice. The 21st Bradford Development Lecture, held on the 18th of June 2015, is a particularly apt continuation of the tone set in past year’s lecture.

In this year’s lecture, José Manuel Salazar-Xirinachs has given an enriching presentation on how productive development policies are central to ‘inclusive growth’. This growth concept, admittedly somewhat intangible, diverges from the focus on GDP measurement. Instead of the narrow emphasis on GDP, this model is more long-term and combines “economic prosperity, social justice and environmental sustainability”. It is used as a guideline against which economic policies can be evaluated. In his lecture, Salazar-Xirinachs differentiates the notion of productive ‘structural transformation’ policies from neo-liberal structural adjustment policies; the former being regarded as more socially beneficial and advanced than the latter. He raises the notion of a ‘new invisible hand’. This ‘new invisible hand’ would take the shape of institutional arrangements based on engagement between the public and the private and stakeholder involvement. It is perhaps suitable to call the concept a hand that is invisible, as it also forms what Salazar-Xirinachs terms the ‘new frontier’ for research and practice: an area, which yet has to be explored and established. This ‘new frontier’ stands for the institutional challenges that exist and emerge through public-private co-operation, partnerships and stakeholder consultations, and a “rigorously analytical” process of fostering and examination of such.

The lecture was chaired by Vice-Chancellor, Professor Cantor. Given the timing of the lecture at the end of the teaching period, the lecture was visited by the main ‘core’ of individuals interested in international development and policy processes.

The Q&A session saw the clarification of the notion of productive development policies: post-financial crisis austerity measures in the Euro-Zone are an “exercise in financial programming” but do not fall under 'productive development', which infrastructural subsidies for roads and transport, etc, on the other hand, would. Yet, if a ‘magic bullet’ for youth unemployment was to be put forward, the dual-apprenticeship system prevalent e.g. in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, would come close to such. Another question, finely nuanced, sought Salzar-Xirinachs’ advice on economic development prospects if a country is impaired from going through the traditional stages of growth (from agriculture to manufacturing to services), because its manufacturing capacities are out priced by Chinese manufacturing, and service sector industries are not seen as having the capacity for sustained growth. In response to this Salazar-Xirinachs highlights a phenomenon of ‘premature deindustrialisation’ because of stronger import competition and technological advances reducing amounts of labour required. This somewhat bleak outlook can be mitigated by the argument that China would increasingly price itself out of the manufacturing sector, given a growing middle class, which opens an opportunity for African manufacturers. The advice would be the creation of a domestic climate that fosters investment from within or abroad to substitute products from the ‘global factory’: China. Further Salazar-Xirinachs mentions that a highly-quality service sector in fact can provide substantial income and growth, yet the division between sectors might be out-dated, as the reality nowadays sees the boundaries between agriculture, industry and services disappearing.

The Bradford Centre for International Development (BCID) is immensely grateful for this enriching lecture, which certainly will prove to be a very useful resource for present and future students of international development.

A video recording of the lecture can be found here:

For questions or comments on the lecture please contact Dr P.B. Anand.

One Day Seminar on UK Arms Export Policy

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Professor Neil Cooper, Director of the Rotary Peace Centre in the Division of Peace Studies has been awarded funding from the BISA Working Group on Foreign Policy to run a one-day seminar on UK arms export policy. The seminar will take place on 16 September and will be hosted by the Rotary Peace Centre.

The seminar will bring together academics and representatives from a range of arms trade NGOs and think-tanks to critically examine the evolution of UK arms export policy, implementation of the current framework of UK export regulations, the challenges to the current paradigm of regulation and alternative models.

Additional funding has been made available by BISA to support attendance at the seminar by PhD students and/or early career post-doctoral students. For details of how to apply for this funding or for further information about the seminar please contact Professor Neil Cooper: r.n.cooper@bradford.ac.uk

The Other Violence: Research in El Salvador and Guatemala

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Whilst the Middle East deservedly attracts the attention of the world for the political violence which has cost the lives of thousands, Latin America is off the radar. However, it is the region of the world with the highest levels of violence outside a war zone. Indeed in the month of May, 2015, El Salvador even surpassed the murders that month in Iraq with over 600 homicides.

The violences in Latin America reflect a multiplicity of violences but not a polarised war between parties. This makes it much more complex. However, it raises many important questions about the nature of violence and its relationship to politics and economics. While some young men in the Middle East (and some from Europe) have found identity and meaning in joining violent Islamic movements, in Central America, young men with no meaningful futures have found their identity in gangs, extortion and association with organised crime. Latin America (and in particular the Northern Triangle of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, Mexico and Venezuela) is an extreme case of how violence by and outside the State can reproduce itself and how a generation of young men in search of meaning in a consumerist and jobless economy can be the vehicle for its reproduction.

Despite economic growth between 2002 and 2012 and a decline in absolute levels of poverty, Latin America remains the only region of the world where violence has continued to grow, according to the UN Office of Drugs and Crime 2014 report. Violence is compatible with economic growth. This is notably the case when elites have failed to construct an effective and equitable rule of law. And it is compatible with democratisation. The region is no longer under military rule and since the 1990s, with a few exceptions, it has been governed through democratic elections, in which left wing governments have come to power in a number of countries.

Jenny Pearce has been studying Latin American violences and their impacts on politics and participation, in order to understand dynamics of violence reproduction and to contribute to a broader study of politics and violence. Jenny spent nearly a month in the region in July, revisiting sites of her research over the years and also analysing old and new expressions of violence.

El Salvador: historical memory, violence of the past and the present

Jenny Pearce - the other violence 1 In September last year, Jenny returned thirty years on to the war zone of Chalatenango where she had undertaken an oral history of the peasant movement during the Salvadorean civil war. She worked with the Museum of historical memory on building memory using the photographs taken by Mike Goldwater in the journey in what was a guerrilla controlled zone in 1984. In July 2015, Jenny returned with the documentary made by Richard Duffy of the process. The photos below are of the process of showing the documentary in the church in Arcatao, Chalatenango and in the community centre in Las Vueltas. The violence recounted by the peasants is of a savage and brutal violence from the state. Over thirty years later, the violences appear to be from within society. However, the state’s response towards youth gangs is still to militarise the problem, although it is now under the government of the FMLN, who the peasants of Chalatenango supported during the war.

Guatemala: politics, corruption and violence

In April 2015 a report was produced by the international anti corruption body, CICIG, on the financing of Guatemala’s political parties It found that 75% came from organised crime and corruption. Following a brutal civil war, in which over a quarter of a million mostly indigenous people, were slaughtered in the early 1980s, Guatemala had begun a path of democratisation and then to the Peace Accords of 1996. A great deal of hopeful expectations surrounded the Accords. However, high levels of violence, extreme poverty differentially impacting on the indigenous population and systematic corruption have led some to talk today about a ‘captured state’. Jenny Pearce has been following the dynamics of these processes in one Department, Huehuetenango, trafficking has become a major presence since the mid 2000s, Varied forms of rural and urban violence blight the lives of many. Mining contracts and hydroelectric plants have been fiercely resisted by communities who used legal consultations to reject the exploitation of their lands. Since 2013, arrests began of leaders of these movements.

Jenny Pearce - the other violence 4 Currently there are nine peasant leaders in prison, who were part of the protests in Barillas, Huehuetenango. In the meantime, the political system of the department reflects the fragmentation and corruption of the national picture. In these photos, Jenny attended a meeting of the National Electoral Institute who were holding an event in Ixtuahacan, a municipality of Huehuetenango to try and get the political parties to make a ‘gentlemen’s pact’ against violence and corruption. There are sixteen parties in this small municipality of some 40,000 people contesting the role of Mayor in elections due in September. Jenny was asked to speak on behalf of CEDFOG (The Educational and Documentation Centre of the Western Frontier of Guatemala), with whom she has collaborated since 1999. Below, she talks to Natividad, one of the Mayoral candidates, and only the second time a woman, and a Mayan woman has stood. One of the topics of discussion, was how to make it possible for women with babies and pregnant women to stand in the long queues to vote. Other topics, include the importance of not buying votes or taking money from criminal sources or using public money for campaigns.

Professor Jenny Pearce

researches violence, participation and social change. Her interest is rooted in over 40 years of research and action in Latin America, which has focused on struggles for democracy, human rights and social justice.

Rotary Peace Fellows 2015

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University of Bradford's Rotary Peace Fellows met the Chair of the Rotary Peace Centres Committee Peter Kyle and Rotary Peace Centre specialist Tyler Allen in their first meeting of the 14th class of Rotary Peace Fellows at Bradford.

Tyler and Peter with Class XIV,  November 2015

Pictured left to right: Sara Eftekhar, Kari Williams, Lauren Coffaro, Zabitullah Aimal, Tyler Allen (Rotary Peace Centre Specialist), Zac Chiliswa, Regina Mutiru, Peter Kyle (Chair, Rotary Peace Centres Committee), Rita M. Lopidia Abraham, Choloe Chapple, Yuko Maeno, Christina Khoury.

Peace Studies Publishes 2014/15 Annual Report

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The Division of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford has launched the Peace and Conflict Research Annual Report 2014/15, which celebrates the historic event of the 40th anniversary of Peace Studies. The Department of Peace Studies is globally recognised as the leading academic centre of excellence for Peace and Conflict Research.

This international and national recognition was demonstrated in its outstanding performance in the UK-wide 2014 Research. Excellence Framework (REF) and was ranked 7th nationally for impact and 15th position out of 56 universities nationwide for research environment.

2014/15 academic year has been a landmark in Peace Studies, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the School of Peace Studies with memorable activities such as the 40th anniversary International Conference in May 2014 attended by 27 countries; the 40th anniversary regional conferences in Africa (Uganda) in November 2014 and in Asia (Japan) in March 2015 and the planting of the PeacePole, the first ever on any UK University campus.

In addition, the teaching, research and knowledge transfer work of Peace Studies and the expertise of the staff are constantly in demand by global governance institutions such as the UN and its specialised agencies; World Bank; leading intergovernmental organisations like the EU and the Africa Union and major development co-operation partners and donor agencies working in the Global South countries. We are proud of the work and impact of Peace Studies globally and, in particular, graduates from Peace Studies are now working across the globe, using their knowledge and skills to help solve some of the perennial problems of poverty, social exclusion, underdevelopment, climate change, wars and armed conflicts, security, terrorism and peacebuilding. Peace Studies is recognised and supported across the University as one of the key areas of strengths of the University. The Department is strategically placed to make a significant contribution to the growth and delivery of the Faculty of Social Sciences 10 Year Development Plan in the areas of teaching innovation, increase in students recruitment and enhancing students experience, research income generation, staff development and internationalisation.

You can download the Annual Report by clicking the link below.

Peace and Conflict Research at Bradford - Annual Report

Bradford Rotary Peace Centre: 2016 Visiting Researcher Programme: Call for Applications

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The Visiting Researcher Programme provides funding for an expert in the field of Peace and Conflict Resolution broadly defined to spend up to six months at the Bradford Rotary Peace Centre. The funding will cover the costs of travel to the Peace Centre, as well as accommodation and subsistence whilst located at the Peace Centre. During their time at the Centre the Visiting Researcher will be expected to produce (i) a publication or series of publications based on research undertaken whilst at the Centre and (ii) undertake a series of activities with Rotary Peace Fellows. Ideally the visiting Researcher will start their stay at the Bradford Centre by 1 February 2015 but a later starting date will be considered where relevant.

Background

The Rotary Peace Centre was established in 2002 and located in the prestigious Division of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford. The Bradford Rotary Centre is one of six other Peace Centres established around the world by Rotary International to develop leaders who will become catalysts for peace and conflict prevention. Up until recently, the Bradford Centre has principally focussed on administering the Rotary scholarship programme, under which the Centre hosts ten Fellows per year who undertake an 18 month MA programme. However, we are now also seeking to enhance the research profile of the Centre and as part of this goal we will provide funding for an academic or practitioner to spend up to six months at the Bradford Centre.

Requirements of the Visiting Researcher

Whilst at the Rotary Peace Centre the Visiting Researcher will:

  1. Undertake a programme of research and writing that will lead to a publication or series of publications based on the research undertaken at the Centre. These publications will be identified as Rotary Centre outputs.
  1. A programme of activity (e.g. masterclass/expert seminar series) linked to the work of the visiting researcher and provided to Rotary Peace Fellows. The details of this activity should be outlined in the application
  1. Formal lecture to MA and PGR students, also made available to other Rotary Centres

Funding for Visiting Researcher

Funding will be provided to cover the following expenses:

Travel (up to £750) return economy class air ticket

Accommodation and subsistence: up to £750 pcm = £4,500 over 6 months

Application Process

Applications from academics from other Rotary centres and former Rotary Fellows will be particularly welcomed but we also welcome applications from any established academics or practitioners proposing to undertake research in the field of peace and conflict resolution broadly defined.

Possible areas of research within this field might include (but are not limited to):

  • Peacekeeping
  • Post-conflict peacebuilding,
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Mediation
  • Conflict Prevention
  • Regional dimensions of peace, conflict prevention and resolution (particularly Africa, Middle East, Latin America and South-East Asia)
  • Political violence
  • Arms control and disarmament
  • Non-violence
  • Culture and peace

Applicants will be asked to submit the following:

  1. A proposal (maximum 5 pages) detailing

(a) Commencement and expiry date of proposed period of stay at the Centre

(b) the planned programme of research, timetable and outputs from the research

(c) Planned activities with Rotary Fellows

(d) Proposed public lecture

(e) Any additional ways the applicant proposes to add to the work and profile of the Rotary Centre

(f) details of visa status (if applicable)

2. CV and contact details (established academics applying to the Centre must have a PhD and a record of high quality research).

Deadline for applications: January 15th 2016. All applications should be submitted to the Director of the Rotary Centre, Professor Neil Cooper:

r.n.cooper@bradford.ac.uk

Further information about the Bradford Rotary Peace Centre can be obtained at: http://www.bradford.ac.uk/social-sciences/peace-studies/rotary-peace-centre/

Further information about the Division of Peace Studies can be obtained at: http://www.bradford.ac.uk/social-sciences/peace-studies/?bnrI

Further information about the Rotary International Peace Fellowship Programme can be obtained at: https://www.rotary.org/myrotary/en/get-involved/exchange-ideas/peace-fellowships

Any enquiries about the Visiting Researcher Programme should be addressed to Professor Neil Cooper

Democracy in sub-Saharan Africa: recent talk given by Peace Studies' academic David Harris

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University of Bradford lecturer David Harris, specialist in post-conflict justice and state re-building gave a talk on sub-Saharan Democracy, at Otley Labour Club on the 18th November 2015, in which David talked about about democracy in sub-Saharan Africa and why its complex development is impacting on the number of refugees arriving at the UK's doorstep in Calais, Dunkirk and beyond. Helen Toft, has written a review of the talk:

Only a couple of people in the audience for Dr David Harris’ open talk on sub-Saharan African democracy had been lucky enough to study at the University of Bradford's Peace Studies department. Yet David enabled the whole audience to engage with his question ‘Beyond the screaming headlines of the effects on Europe of the latest African (and Middle Eastern) migration ‘crisis’, why would people want to make the hazardous journey from Africa to Europe in the first place?’

In this last of an autumn season of ‘Pizza and Politics Cafes’ hosted by Otley and Yeadon Labour Party, David’s publicity abstract had drawn in students, retired and working professionals in the UK and abroad, skilled tradespeople, and charity workers. It included an architect who had lived and worked in Nigeria, an academic who had been on VSO in Sierra Leone in 1967-8 as well as a health researcher in a former communist country in Europe. Even without any direct experience of Africa, all of us had an intelligent interest in world affairs and engaged eagerly with David’s ideas. The talk dynamically demonstrated the need for many more opportunities to engage all of the community in high quality informal education, and the key role this branch should play in this.

Taking his title ‘Bedtime Stories’: democracy as the bringer of development and peace in Africa?’ from the words of the late president of Ethiopia, Meles Zenawi, who ‘did not believe in bedtime stories and contrived arguments linking economic growth with democracy’, David examined his own knowledge and experience in Africa to question if democracy is providing, or is likely to provide, the platform for development and political stability, promised for 25 years, and thus make Africans want to stay at home. He illustrated why these ideals, partly imposed by Western governments and twinned with criteria for receiving money to aid development, had a mixed record, in some cases backfiring with terrible consequences, just as President Meles stated.

Reflecting on our first speaker in the season of local, national and international political themes, I made connections between how Rob Lawrie, a local businessman turned charity worker in the Calais refugee camps, had described how people in the camps were often displaced professionals and entrepreneurs running from persecution, conflict or poverty in their home countries in Africa, not the ‘swarm’ of welfare dependent ‘scroungers’ typified by so much of our press.

Ultimately David’s sharp insights and synthesis allowed us in this short talk to develop a little more understanding of the complexities of this huge continent, our historical and current impact on it, and the consequences for us all. We also experienced for ourselves how lucky David’s students at SOAS, Nottingham and Bradford universities were to have a lecturer who combines academic rigour with direct experience and wit.

Middle East, Conflict and Security: Foreign Policy challenges of the next government

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This public lecture, by Dr Afshin Shahi on Wednesday 18th March 2015, examined the impact of the foreign policy of the past two governments and assessed the challenges that the next government will face, regardless of who actually wins.

The University of Bradford will be hosting the polling station for Bradford West in the 2015 General Elections and in the lead up to the elections will be holding various public events, including five public lectures by academics from our Faculty. These public lectures consider some of the key election issues for the people of Bradford, the UK and the wider world, with analyses of social policy, economics, foreign policy, austerity and poverty.

Dr Afshin Shahi

lectures in international relations in the Division of Peace Studies, specialising in the research areas of: Middle East politics, political Islam and religious sectarianism.

Discover the world with our NEW International Study Year

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We are excited to announce the launch of our International Study Year, providing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for our undergraduate students to live and study abroad for a year.

International study year Anyone who has studied in a foreign country will tell you that it was a defining moment in their life. As well as immersing themselves in a new learning environment, it’s a chance for students to broaden their academic and personal horizons, explore new cultures and develop new perspectives on their subject of study. It’s also an opportunity to experience different cultures and lifestyles, acquire inter-cultural communication skills and a wider knowledge of the world.

“Our semester of study abroad has received so much positive feedback from our students over the years” explains Margaret Alipoor, Director of Studies for Undergraduate Programmes. “It is their feedback and enthusiasm that has driven us to establish the new International Study Year and we hope that as many students as possible take full advantage of this incredible opportunity”.

Charlene Otieno, a Medical Engineering student at the University of Bradford who took part in a year-long Erasmus work placement at Hochschule Ulm in Germany, said: “This opportunity has given me the courage to go out and explore what the world has to offer. Whether it is to Spain or Finland or even Germany, I urge students to chase, explore and learn. You never know what you might collide with, expecting the unexpected is the best part of the experience.”

This truly memorable experience will help to increase confidence and independence, and this valued real-world experience will help set these students apart in an increasingly competitive job market. It will show potential employers flexibility and the determination to take on a challenge.

Programmes for studying abroad include:

  • Erasmus Exchange Programme
  • Worldwide Exchange Programme
  • International Student Exchange Programme
  • Short programmes (such as Erasmus Work Placements and Summer Programmes)

For more information please visit the or contact us by email at ugad.mgt@bradford.ac.uk.

Students deliver hot prospects in business challenge

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A leading air-conditioning manufacturer has hot prospects for the future after turning to University of Bradford School of Management to crowd source fresh ideas from the students.

A leading air-conditioning manufacturer has hot prospects for the future after turning to University of Bradford School of Management to "crowdsource" fresh ideas from the students.

Quartz Air Conditioning, a division of Brighouse-based TEV, asked the business school for help in developing new product ideas that would give them the edge in a highly-competitive market. The solution was an innovative business challenge programme that encouraged the students to help the company find a solution.

The winning idea came from Georgia Tseroni, who was tackling the MSc in Applied Management and Enterprise, who suggested the company make use of a new soundproofing material developed by the University of Bradford. By using the material, which is also cheaper than existing options, Quartz Air Conditioning can turn up the output on the machines without increasing noise. The result is a more efficient product.

The School’s Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Christos Kalantaridis said: “This is all about enabling businesses to crowdsource innovative solutions from the school. The business challenge means businesses get fresh ideas for the big issues they face and students also get to tackle practical business issues. It’s innovation in action.”

TEV director, John Lightfoot, said the challenge had been a hugely worthwhile experience. He says: “We had a challenge with no obvious solutions and we needed some new sparks to make us think so we turned to the School of Management for help.

“It was a very complex issue and we weren’t expecting an obvious solution to come from this. However, Georgia’s idea about using this new material has real potential and we are in talks about introducing it to our product range.”

Georgia, who was awarded a tablet computer for her winning idea, is now working as a project manager in London and has ambitions to become a chartered engineer.

She says: “Bradford is the reason I’m now on the path to a promising career. It’s prepared me for any kind of challenge and also provided me with some amazing experiences.”

MBA students enjoy 'transformational' tour of Poland

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Our MBA students have found that there's no better way to understand the business issues and opportunities in an emerging market than to experience them first hand.

In an "eye-opening and transformational" trip to Poland, more than 30 Bradford MBA students were able to immerse themselves in Polish culture and gain unique business insights by visiting three local companies to probe areas such as innovation, product development, management styles, growth strategies and internationalisation. The trip also included a guest lecture from a leading Polish economist, as well as visiting the country’s salt mines and touring the university in Krakow.

The trip was led by Craig Johnson, Senior Lecturer and Head of Studies for MBA programmes in the UK. He explains: "The years of communism means the cultural differences are significant and management styles are going through an evolution into a more Western way style of working with people. The Bradford MBA is all about international experience. This trip enabled the students to look at a country and business case studies in-depth, with first hand input from the business leaders.

"It has been a fantastic cultural adventure for the students that will feed into their education and future careers. It was also valuable for the business leaders we met in Poland. It’s rare you are able to get such unique insights from the next generation of business people like this."

Some comments from our MBA students:

"In this age of globalisation, it is truly important to have knowledge and experience about different cultures, values and practices. It has been an eye-opening experience with unique insights into a different culture."

"I knew little about Eastern Europe before coming to Poland and this trip gave me invaluable insights for the future. It’s given me an amazing step forward in my studies and provides so much more than your average classroom experience."

"Poland presented me with a great opportunity to grow as an individual. This is now a country that has a direction and momentum on its side to make things even better. I will try to take on this philosophy for the rest of my life. Always knowing where I want to be and building the momentum and support I need to get there. My MBA is almost complete by way of the degree, but as I learned from Krakow, things change and learning and growing will never end for me. This has been a truly transformational experience."

"It was an eventful week with lots of exposure to different cultures, fresh business thinking ideas, the chance to bond with colleagues outside the formality of school and the broadening of my ideas and experiences. For this, I will always be grateful and thankful."

For more photos from the trip see the photo album on Facebook.

World top 10 ranking for Distance Learning MBA

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The University of Bradford's School of Management has been ranked 8th in the world for its Distance Learning MBA, moving up three places from last year to a global top 10 position.

The Financial Times global rankings also places Bradford first in the world for career progress for its graduates and second for value for money. On average, graduates from the school saw their salaries rise by 43 per cent three years after graduating.

The ranking comes after a year in which the School of Management was named one of Europe’s and the world’s top business schools in two other Financial Times surveys (FT European Business Schools and Masters in Management). Bradford was also ranked 14th best of all UK universities for teaching marketing (Complete University Guide), as well as moving up 65 places to 34th in The Guardian University Guide rankings.

Professor Jon Reast, Dean of the University’s School of Management, said: "We are delighted and extremely proud to see our distance learning MBA recognised as a world leader.

"We have more than 800 distance learning MBA students currently on our programme from over 30 countries and different cultures and industry backgrounds worldwide. That even includes a student based at the Arctic Circle."

Key to the success of the Bradford Distance Learning MBA is both the quality of the learning experience and the flexibility of the programme. Students can take two to six years to complete their MBA. They can choose to study online or on-site, take just one subject module per quarter to ease the workload or take a break from their study if work pressures are too high.

"Our students particularly value the high level of support we provide, wherever they are located in the world", said Jay Muir, Director of Studies for the Distance Learning MBA.

"Each student is assigned an individual tutor to guide them through each subject module and there are live online tutorials and workshops to discuss business and managerial issues with fellow students from all around the world. Studying while they work also gives them the opportunity to practically apply their learning directly back to the workplace."

The School of Management has not only been a pioneer in launching one of the world’s first distance learning MBAs back in 1998, it has more recently introduced the world’s first online MBA in Innovation, Enterprise and the Circular Economy. This MBA was conceived and developed with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation to take the lead in a business curriculum focused on the principles of the circular economy and sustainable development. The programme is set to receive the endorsement of the United Nations for its support of Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) and supports Bradford’s strategy to be one of the world’s most sustainable universities.

See the Financial Times website for more information.

What needs to be shared (and not shared) when we share information?

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This month, the University of Bradford School of Management hosted the second in a series of 12 Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) seminars to address the urgent challenges posed by the sharing of personal information in public service delivery

Information sharing is a central concern across policy domains such as health, crime, education and employment. Disasters and tragedies have repeatedly been attributed to the failure of agencies to share information. Attempts have been made to fix the problem through a variety of legislative, policy and IT approaches, yet individuals and organisations still struggle to share and communicate information effectively. The Centre of Excellence for Information Sharing is trying new ways of supporting practitioners to share information well and is a partner in the seminar series, which is led by Professor Rob Wilson of Newcastle University.

‌The packed seminar entitled ‘Multi-agency, Multi-user, Multi-locale Working: Sharing Information for and about Families’ was organised by Dr Sue Richardson from the University of Bradford School of Management and Dr Sue Baines of Manchester Metropolitan University who together tailored the session to focus on multi-agency working delivering services not to a single individual but to a group of connected individuals.

Interactive exercise A speaker at the seminar was Newcastle University’s Professor Deborah Chambers, who said: “Not only did the event confirm the vital role of information sharing within a complex multi-agency regime of welfare provision in the UK, it also drew attention to pivotal issues about consent, ownership of information, the purpose of information and the differences in approaches to information sharing between agencies.

‌“The seminar provided stark evidence that the lives of real families and real people are adversely affected when information sharing is uncoordinated, because it impedes the analysis that underpins the effective interventions required to improve those lives.”

The seminar was not a 'how to' of information sharing; instead, it successfully brought together academics, practitioners and research students to discuss problems encountered, potential solutions and to share examples of good practice. Other speakers included Dr Kate Cook of Manchester Law School; James Cornford, University of East Anglia, Catherine O’Melia of Leeds Families First; Kate Karban of the University of Bradford and Paul Davidson of Sedgemoor District Council.

Learn more about the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar Series being held throughout 2014-2017.

Read a blog on the event by one delegate from the Centre of Excellence for Information Sharing and another from one of the poster presenters here .

Bradford leaps into UK top 50 of Times Higher student survey with highest ranking rise

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The University of Bradford has achieved the highest rise in overall ranking of all UK universities in the 2015 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey results, leaping into the top 50.

The University of Bradford has achieved the highest rise in overall ranking of all UK universities in the 2015 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey results, leaping into the top 50.

The University rose from 80th place in 2014 to 45th in this year’s survey, which ranks universities by the excellence of their provision for students, as rated by the students themselves.

Nearly 14,700 students across the country contributed to the survey, which measures 21 attributes of universities, chosen by students as key indicators of the quality of their experience.

These include high-quality facilities, high quality staff/lecturers, good industry connections, good sports facilities, good community atmosphere and cheap shop/bar/amenities.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor said: “We pride ourselves on our students' experience and work hard each year to make sure that we provide an excellent environment and outstanding support, both academically and socially. What is especially pleasing is that our students are recognising the work we are doing to support them, which is reflected in the University’s significant rise in the rankings."

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Shirley Congdon, added: "I am delighted that our students value the continued improvements to their experience at the University of Bradford.

"Through strong and sustained partnership working with students we have responded to the needs of our diverse student body providing personalised approaches to learning, employability, student support and life on campus.”

UK leading business woman appointed as Chancellor at University of Bradford

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One of the UK's leading business women and School of Management alumna, Kate Swann, has been appointed as the new Chancellor of the University of Bradford.

She becomes the formal head of the University in succession to the sportsman and politician, Imran Khan, who stepped down from the post in November 2014. The University's Court has formally approved Kate's appointment and she will be installed by Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor at a future date.

The Chancellor is the formal Head of the University, whose official duties are to confer degrees on graduating students, and to chair the University's Court. The Chancellor also plays a key role in the University's life as an ambassador for the institution in the UK and internationally.

Kate took up the role of CEO of the SSP group in September 2013, following ten years as CEO of WHSmith. Prior to this she was Managing Director of Argos, the UK's leading general merchandise retailer, a subsidiary of GUS plc. Kate joined Argos in December 2000 from Homebase, where she was promoted to Managing Director from Marketing Director after three years with the company.

She began her career at Tesco in 1989 as a graduate trainee and throughout her career has held a number of senior marketing roles within retail at Homepride Foods, Coca Cola and Dixons Group. She graduated from the University of Bradford with a degree in Business Management in 1986 and was awarded an honorary degree from Bradford in 2007. In 2006 she was listed in the top 50 most powerful women in business.

Kate Swann Profile

Commenting on the appointment, Kate Swann said, "I am thrilled to be joining the team at Bradford as Chancellor, at such an exciting stage of the university’s development. I enjoyed my time as an undergraduate enormously and look forward to supporting the university as it continues to make a real difference to its students, business and society more widely."

Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bradford, Professor Brian Cantor, said: "We are very pleased that Kate Swann is now our new Chancellor. Kate is one of the University's most successful graduates. She is an outstandingly successful businesswoman, and will be a great role model for both our students and graduates. I very much look forward to working with Kate to promote the University of Bradford as one of the world's leading technology universities."


‌View Kate’s BSc Business and Management Studies graduate profile from our 2009 Undergraduate Prospectus
.

Bradford continues to be among world's best accredited by EQUIS

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The University of Bradford's School of Management has again achieved accreditation by the European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS), reaffirming the school's capacity to offer the highest standard of business education.

The School of Management have held the EQUIS accreditation since 2000.

“EQUIS accreditation is one of the most important benchmarks available to business schools to ensure excellence in teaching, student experience, research and outreach,” says Jon Reast, Dean of the School of Management. “I am very pleased that our substantial effort to continually improve in all aspects of what we do has been well recognised.”

To achieve EQUIS accreditation, schools must demonstrate academic distinction, close connections with the corporate world, and commitment to innovation in teaching and program design. Schools are also evaluated on their ability to create learning environments that promote leadership and entrepreneurial skills, as well as a sense of global responsibility.

EQUIS is one of the world’s three leading quality accreditations for higher education in business. Bradford is extremely proud to hold all three – The Triple Crown – including the Association of MBA’s (AMBA) and the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business AACSB, making it one of only 59 Business Schools in the world to have earned this crown.

“The EQUIS awarding body noted that the role of ethics, responsibility and sustainability was expressed in the values of the School and that sustainability and especially the Circular Economy are at the core of its research activities.”

EQUIS accreditation is run by the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD), a global non-profit promoting international business education. The awarding body consists of leaders from top universities and corporate executives.

School of Management graduates in Richard Branson's Pitch to Rich semi-final

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Two School of Management graduates have been named as one of 10 semi-finalists in the national Pitch to Rich competition, run by Virgin Media Business and spearheaded by Sir Richard Branson, to find the UK's most innovative businesses.

SLPY

Yorkshire start-up business SLPY has been selected from 979 entrants in the start-up category.

Co-founders Martin and Lisa Brailsford graduated in 1999 from the School of Management’s BSc Business and Management Studies programme.

SLPY began trading in August 2014 when they launched their first product ‘The Original Sleepy’, a wearable sleeping bag, at Boardmasters Festival.

Since then Martin and Lisa have focused on brand development, sales and harnessing the latest manufacturing technology for new product designs launching this summer.

Quirky and innovative

SLPY products are created for campers, festival goers, backpackers, students and outdoor adventurers.

Martin says: "We’re about having fun outdoors.

"SLPY make products that help people enjoy their outdoor lifestyle with a smile and a wink.

"Our products are quirky and innovative, yet functional.”

Public voting is now underway for the 10 shortlisted businesses. The three with the most votes will become finalists, who will pitch their idea directly to Richard Branson and a panel of judges later this month.

School of Management Professor appears on BBC One's Inside Out

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Why do shopping malls continue to thrive? Professor Stuart Roper provides insights on last night's BBC One's Inside Out, the report also includes a section on Bradford's new Broadway shopping centre that will open in November.

You can see the report via BBC iPlayer (available until 18 November 2015), the report starts at 12min 15s.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06jg3pv/inside-out-yorkshire-and-lincolnshire-19102015

Professor Stuart Roper on TV

Bradford Executive MBA in Financial Times Global 100

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The Bradford Executive MBA has today been recognised in the World Top 100 in the prestigious Financial Times rankings, placing it in the Top 10 of UK Business Schools and Top 5 in the UAE.

Bradford is also the only Business School from the North of England listed in the rankings.

‘We are delighted to receive this recognition’ commented David Spicer, Interim Dean ‘the Executive MBA has been thoroughly revamped in recent years and it is pleasing to see these changes being recognised by the rankings’.

Programme Director Craig Johnson commented “This excellent result is a reflection of the quality of participants we attract onto the Executive MBA and the passion of colleagues who work tirelessly to advance the Bradford MBA”.

is designed to develop the strategic leadership qualities of participants. The two year, part-time programme is highly flexible to fit around the careers of busy working managers and professionals. Modular in structure, the programme provides the strategic, financial and people skills needed to perform effectively at a senior level.

Managers can choose to study at one of two locations either in Bradford or Dubai. If neither of those is possible geographically, there is the sister programme: the Bradford Distance Learning MBA, which is Global Top 10, No1 for Career Progression and No2 for Value for Money.

For more information on the Executive MBA, please or contact Paula Ellis on 01274 236518

Bradford MBA Student impresses Institute of Business Ethics

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James Peacock, a Bradford Executive MBA student, wrote a winning essay for the 2015 Institute of Business Ethics annual student essay competition.

On 13 October he attended a special event held at the IBE headquarters in London. After being awarded his prize he then presented a brief overview of his findings to a crowd of leading experts in ethics and sustainability.

James, who works as a Waste Contracts Manager for Wessex Water, said:

“I’m absolutely delighted to receive the award. The Institute is widely respected so it was great to receive the acknowledgement of my hard work and of the quality of business ethics teaching on the MBA.”

The essay entitled ‘Water Poverty – a real threat in the UK?’ explores the moral dilemmas the water industry faces when dealing with people who can’t or won’t pay their bills. As James explains:

“Water bills have risen by 40% in real terms since 1990, which means more and more people have difficulties in paying. Should we shut off their supplies or do people have a right to access to water? How should this be balanced the need to protect the environment or fairness to other customers? The essay attempts to answer these and other questions around a difficult moral issue.”

Talking about the award, , who teaches on the MBA commented:

“Responsible value creation is at the heart of our values on the Bradford MBA. Strategic leadership in today’s society means that decisions need to have an ethical, environmental and sustainable dimension to them. James’s success is a reflection of those principles and we congratulate him on his success”

The Institute of Business Ethics is non-profit organisation which raises public awareness of ethical business practice as well as working closely with organisations.

, including our new Circular Economy MBA.

Article on Bradford Trading Room accepted for publication in Cogent Economics and Finance

Published:

Abhi Sharma, senior lecturer in Economics at the University of Bradford School of Management, has had an article on the Bradford Trading Room accepted for publication in Cogent Economics and Finance.

The Bradford Trading Room provides students with hands-on experience in a simulated trading environment. This gives students a feel for real investment decisions made in industry and they learn how to deal responsibly with financial and economic market data. The Trading Room uses Bloomberg Professional - the industry's most widely used financial information software package.

The article "Use of Bloomberg Professional in support of finance and economics teaching" evaluates the use of the specialist software and provides a critical overview of the main challenges involved in making effective use of a trading room.

Read the article - "Use of Bloomberg Professional in support of finance and economics teaching" (PDF) - 1163Kb

Bradford leaps into European Top 50

Published:

The School of Management at the University of Bradford is the highest climber in this year's Financial Times European Business School rankings, jumping 16 places into the Top 50, with its full-time MBA ranked European Top 10 for % salary increase.

Rankings are a key factor when deciding where to study with the FT the most influential. The annual FT rankings are an independent evaluation of the quality and breadth of a schools’ postgraduate programme. It is based on their performance in the four main rankings published by the FT each year: MBA, Executive MBA, Masters in Management and Executive Education.

“I am thrilled with the progress the School of Management has made over the last year in the FT rankings,” commented Dr David Spicer, Interim Dean. “To be ranked 11th in the UK and No1 in Yorkshire is a fantastic achievement and reward for the hard work of the team at Bradford”.

For Dr Craig Johnson, MBA Programme Director, the full-time MBA ranking was particularly pleasing. “Of the many reasons to study an MBA, seeking to accelerate your career is one of the most important and is best reflected by how your salary changes. To be in the Top 10 in Europe is a wonderful achievement“.

The University of Bradford School of Management is one of an elite group of triple accredited Business School*, delivering executive education through an extensive range of Masters in Management and MBA programmes: full time and part-time. The success in the FT Business School rankings follows on from the progress made with the Bradford Distance Learning MBA earlier this year that achieved Global Top 10 status and Global No1 for career progression.

The range of Bradford Masters and MBA programmes is designed to develop the strategic leadership qualities of participants who choose the programme that best meets their particular needs and learning preferences. The programmes provide the skills needed to ultimately perform effectively at a senior level.

For more information on any of the Bradford postgraduate programmes please visit the website (bradford.ac.uk) or to speak with our Masters or MBA Admission teams call or email +44 1274 234 321/ applymsc.mgt@bradford.ac.uk (Masters) and +44 1274 234321/mba@bradford.ac.uk (MBA)

*The University of Bradford’s School of Management is one of only 73 business schools to be accredited by EQUIS, AMBA and AACSB

Bradford Law Students Win Moot

Published:

December saw Bradford Law Society students Sara Fullalove (2nd year) and Pierre Clarke (3rd year), triumph against Leeds University Law School in the first round of the Essex Court Mooting event.

2015 is the first year our Law students have taken part in the national competition, the winner of which is offered a mini-pupillage in the Essex Court chambers, a cash prize and a trophy.

Sara, who acted as lead council commented “Law students rarely have the opportunity to use their legal knowledge in real life situations. Mooting allows us to gain experience of applying the law to legal minds who pass judgment on our legal interpretation and advocacy skills. We are lucky here at Bradford to have the support of our academic team, some of whom still practice law.”

It was a tough moot and the judges found merit in both arguments, however Bradford won by a margin of 9 points.

With the all-important first win under their belt the team are looking forward to the next round and hope to be a step closer to the once in a lifetime opportunity to moot in the Supreme Court in London in the final round.

Bradford leaps into UK top 50 of Times Higher student survey with highest ranking rise

Published:

The University of Bradford has achieved the highest rise in overall ranking of all UK universities in the 2015 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey results, leaping into the top 50.

The University of Bradford has achieved the highest rise in overall ranking of all UK universities in the 2015 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey results, leaping into the top 50.

The University rose from 80th place in 2014 to 45th in this year’s survey, which ranks universities by the excellence of their provision for students, as rated by the students themselves.

Nearly 14,700 students across the country contributed to the survey, which measures 21 attributes of universities, chosen by students as key indicators of the quality of their experience.

These include high-quality facilities, high quality staff/lecturers, good industry connections, good sports facilities, good community atmosphere and cheap shop/bar/amenities.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor said: “We pride ourselves on our students' experience and work hard each year to make sure that we provide an excellent environment and outstanding support, both academically and socially. What is especially pleasing is that our students are recognising the work we are doing to support them, which is reflected in the University’s significant rise in the rankings."

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Shirley Congdon, added: "I am delighted that our students value the continued improvements to their experience at the University of Bradford.

"Through strong and sustained partnership working with students we have responded to the needs of our diverse student body providing personalised approaches to learning, employability, student support and life on campus.”

University Professor of Diversity named in New Year Honours list

Published:

The University of Bradford's Professor of Diversity, Uduak Archibong, has been named in the New Year Honours list 2015.

Her contributions to higher education and equality during her career were officially recognised when she was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire on 31 December.

School of Dementia Studies receives million pound funding to help lower hospital admissions

Published:

The School of Dementia Studies, University of Bradford has received £1million to develop and test an intervention that will reduce avoidable hospital admissions from care homes.

The study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), is led by Professor Murna Downs, Head of the School of Dementia Studies with the University’s Faculty of Health Studies, and will begin in March 2015 to be completed by June 2018.

Professor Murna Downs, said: “Reducing rates of hospitalisation for Ambulatory Care Sensitive (ACS) conditions is a government priority. ACS conditions, if not actively managed, can lead to unplanned hospital admissions, which are costly to the NHS and distressing to the person, their family and nursing home staff.

“Nursing home residents are amongst the frailest and most vulnerable members of society. Most have complex health care needs and more than two thirds have dementia. Spotting early changes in residents’ health is essential to ensure active management of ACS conditions in nursing homes.”

Research carried out in 2012 from a Programme Development Grant (PDG) identified multi-component interventions which, when tested in US nursing homes, showed promise in reducing avoidable admissions. They involved a combination of skills enhancement of nurses and care assistants, clinical guidance and decision-support tools, family involvement and implementation support.

Professor Downs and her team will build on these findings and test the outcomes in a UK setting. She will use the NIHR funding to carry out a two-stage research programme with the aim of reducing avoidable hospital admissions.

Professor Downs added: “With this funding we hope to develop and test guidance for care homes, which has the potential to reduce avoidable hospital admissions. Here at Bradford, we are committed to carrying out cutting-edge research that improves lives and addresses some of the biggest issues in society today, including an aging population.”

The funding will enable the researchers to work in collaboration with primary and secondary care clinicians, nursing home staff and family members to develop clinical guidance and decision support systems for UK nursing homes. They will also determine the best methods to enhance the skills of nursing home staff and clarify the role of family members. Finally the grant will enable the researchers to design the implementation support and guidance for the intervention.

In stage two of the programme, they will test the new guidance in two nursing homes in Bradford. They will then conduct a pilot evaluation in 16 nursing homes in Bradford and London to determine the impact of the guidance on avoidable hospital admissions and on a range of resident, staff, family and system-related secondary outcomes.

In this second stage they will also receive stakeholder feedback. If the results suggest that the intervention reduces avoidable admissions from nursing homes, they will seek further funding to evaluate the intervention in a larger number of nursing homes around the country.

Professor Downs will work with a range of researchers from across the country on the project (listed below). This includes working with research network volunteers from the Alzheimer's Society

Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Alzheimer’s Society is thrilled to see our Research Network volunteers playing an integral role in shaping this important research.

“Through sharing their real-life experiences of caring for someone with dementia, our volunteers are adding tremendous value to the research by ensuring that it is well designed and stands the best chance of maximising benefits for people with the condition. In this case, their involvement will ensure that the research findings will result in practical ways to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions.”

Notes

This study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research Programme Grants for Applied Research (NIHR PGfAR) Programme (ref: RP-PG-0612-20010).

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (www.nihr.ac.uk).

Research team: M Downs (University of Bradford), E Sampson (University College London), K Froggatt (Lancaster University), B McCormack (Queen Margaret University), B Woodward-Carlton (PPI representative, Alzheimer’s Society Research Network), S Nurock (PPI representative, Alzheimer’s Society Research Network), L Robinson (University of Newcastle), C Ballard (Kings College London), H Gage (University of Surrey), G Rait (University College London), R Hunter (University College London), N Freemantle (University College London), J Young (Bradford Institute for Health Research) and J Wright (Bradford Institute for Health Research).

New Dementia Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford

Published:

Alzheimer's Society has announced the launch of a new dementia-focussed Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford.

The Centre will further enhance the University’s international reputation for person-centred care and services research by funding seven PhD students to develop new ways to support people with dementia and their families and improve the quality of dementia care at times of transition.

There are significantly fewer scientists working in dementia research than other conditions, with six times more people working in cancer than dementia. Alzheimer’s Society aims to attract new people to dementia research from a range of different academic and clinical backgrounds, bringing fresh ideas and talent to help expand the boundaries of dementia science.

The doctoral studies at Bradford will all focus on improving care at points of transition for people affected by dementia. One of the doctoral studies at Bradford will be establishing best practice when people with dementia move from being cared for in hospital to care homes. Difficulty at this point of transition has been cited as a factor in the recent A&E crisis. Another project will research effective ways of supporting South Asian families in managing behavioural difficulties in a relative with dementia. Numbers of people with dementia of South Asian ethnicity are growing and most live at home with their families, yet those families are less likely to access available services to assist them in caring.

The Doctoral Training Centre will include four doctorates funded by a £450,000 grant from Alzheimer’s Society, two funded by the University of Bradford and one by the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

The University of Bradford Centre is one of eight new specialist doctoral training centres around the country that are being co-ordinated and funded by Alzheimer’s Society. With matched funding from institutions, this represents nearly £5 million in new investment to support 55 PhDs and clinical fellows – the single biggest funding commitment to support early-career dementia researchers in the UK.

Murna Downs, Professor in Dementia Studies, and Jan Oyebode, Professor of Dementia Care, who are the co-directors of the new Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford said: We are delighted to have this significant investment in the future of person-centred care and services research at Bradford. It is timely to put the focus on transitions, as living with change is an inevitable feature of living with dementia. The doctoral researchers in our Centre will provide new knowledge to help people to effectively plan for and manage transitions in dementia care. “

Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Society said: “There’s a huge amount of progress being made by the dementia research community but unless we attract and train the best young talent we will limit how quickly we can make ground breaking discoveries. For too long dementia research has been underfunded and as a result we have significantly fewer scientists than other conditions.

“If we’re going to defeat dementia we need to give the best brains the right opportunities and build a research workforce that is fit for the future. That’s why we’re proud to be announcing the largest investment of its kind, which will see £5 million committed to create the next generation of dementia researchers. People with dementia deserve nothing less than an all-out fight back against the condition and our Doctoral Training Centres will help us enlist the right people to lead it.”

Bradford leads the way in two new dementia studies

Published:

Two University of Bradford staff have received prestigious awards for their research projects on improving care for people affected by dementia.

Dr Sahdia Parveen and Lindsey Collins, both from the University’s School of Dementia Studies, have been awarded funding from the Alzheimer’s’ Society to run two studies looking at different aspects of dementia.

Dr Sahdia Parveen will be looking at how to support current and prospective carers whilst Lindsey Collins will be exploring eating and drinking difficulties for people with dementia in care homes.

Professor Murna Downs, Head of the School of Dementia Studies, said: “Bradford continues to lead the way in researching the experience of living with dementia.

“These studies are looking at areas in dementia care that have previously had little or no exploration. Both Lindsey and Sahdia hope that by carrying out these pioneering studies they can help develop further understanding of dementia care and ultimately help improve the lives of those living with dementia and their carers.

Dr Parveen has been awarded £224,834 for a study over three years looking at how willingness, obligation and preparation are linked with carers' well-being, in both South Asian and white British carers; and also to find out if the next generation of carers is as willing and prepared as current carers.

Dr Parveen also won the Alzheimer’s Society Dementia Research Leaders Award this month for her patient and public engagement activities. The prize was £1000 and was awarded at the annual Alzheimer’s Society conference.

Lindsey’s has received £151,555 for her research which will last four years and look at the experience of eating and drinking difficulties from the perspective of people living with dementia. It is thought that around 50% of people affected by dementia experience problems with eating and drinking, known as dysphagia. The causes and impact of swallowing difficulties can be very varied, ranging from difficulties in getting food and drink into the mouth, to physical problems with choking or food and fluids going into the lungs. Dysphagia can also have a significant impact on well-being and the social element of mealtimes.

For more information visit bradford.ac.uk/health/dementia

University of Bradford welcomes next generation of dementia research leaders

Published:

The University of Bradford's new Doctoral Training Centre has welcomed its first PhD students aiming to become the next generation of dementia research leaders.

The centre will further enhance the University’s international reputation for person-centred dementia care and services research by funding seven PhD students to develop new ways to support people with dementia and their families and improve the quality of dementia care at times of transition.

The University’s centre is one of eight new specialist doctoral training centres around the country that are being co-ordinated and funded by Alzheimer’s Society.

Doctoral studies at Bradford will focus on improving care, health and wellbeing at points of transition for people affected by dementia. Difficulty at this point of transition, whether in level or place of care, has been cited as a factor in the recent A&E crisis.

The centre aims to build research capacity in dementia, creating the future research leaders that dementia needs. The first among them will be Suzanne Hill, Denise de Waal, Courtney Shaw and Akhlak Rauf.

Suzanne, a pharmacist who graduated from Bradford, said: “I have personal experience of seeing family members face the challenges associated with having, and caring for those with dementia. Improving the care and support for people affected by dementia is something I am extremely passionate about. Bradford is internationally recognised for research in this field and offers the chance to work with, and learn from, other students and academics across disciplines. The collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dementia Studies offered the perfect combination.”

Denise, from the Netherlands, who has a background in anthropology and qualitative research, said: “My interest for dementia care stemmed from my mother. She works on a ward for people with dementia at the local nursing home. I spent consecutive summers working in the ward gaining a deep insight into dementia care and the way it affects people living with it and their relatives, friends and broader community. I began to wonder how we can improve the way we care for people with dementia and gain a better understanding of the influence it has on broader society. Bradford has an international reputation for person-centred dementia care and services research.”

Bradford’s reputation was also a key factor in Courtney, a health consultant from Vancouver, Canada, choosing the University. “An illness and hospital admission can be a difficult and stressful time, and I hope my research can make this challenging time less taxing by developing tools and systems to facilitate effective communication between families, medical staff, and people living with dementia. I am thrilled to be doing this research at the University of Bradford, which has such a respected history as a leader in patient safety research.”

Akhlak, originally from Batley and now working for Bradford MDC, said: “My interest in dementia is not simply due to my desire to tackle health and social care inequalities or my work within the local authority but a personal reflection on how my parents looked after my grandmother where she clearly had dementia but no one labelled it for them. Not having a word for dementia in South Asian languages meant my parents were prevented from accessing the right information and support. I hope to build upon my experiences and interest in looking at ways of engagement with BME communities and more specifically understanding the transitions relating to the distress amongst South Asian families where there is someone living with dementia.”

Murna Downs, Professor in Dementia Studies and co-director of the centre, said: “We are delighted and hugely excited to be furthering our prominent role in the future of person-centred dementia care and services research here at Bradford. It is timely to put the focus on transitions, as living with change is an inevitable feature of living with dementia. The doctoral researchers in our centre will provide new knowledge to help people to effectively plan for and manage transitions in dementia care. “

Prof Phil Coates wins China's Tianfu Friendship award

Published:

Prof Phil Coates, the Director of Science Bridges China, was awarded the "Tianfu Friendship Award" on 17th September 2015 at Mianyang, Sichuan Province of China. Mr Wei Hong, Governor of Sichuan Province of China hosted the award ceremony for five winners. Mr Hong thanked Prof Coates for his outstanding contribution and dedication on promoting international exchange and cooperation of Sichuan province, especially for his research collaboration with Sichuan University.

After winning the award, Prof Coates talked to Sichuan News about his future collaboration plans with Sichuan.

Bradford hosts the PPE15' and UK/China AMRI 7th Workshop

Published:

Bradford polymer IRC successfully hosted the PPE15' & UK/China AMRI 7th Workshop.

The three day combined event on the 8th, 9th and 10th September has attracted over 100 participants from China, India and the UK.

Participants include senior academics, companies and government officials.

PPE15 & UK/China AMRI 7th Workshop at Bradford Picture 1.

Prof. Marina Bloj's insight on the changing colours of #TheDress

Published:

Professor Marina Bloj has been in the news recently for a new research article, done in collaboration with Karl Gegenfurtner from the University of Giessen in Germany, which explains the changing colours of #TheDress.

The article was published in the June edition in Current Biology, and can be viewed here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2015.04.043

More details can be found on the .

Article details

Karl R. Gegenfurtner, Marina Bloj and Matteo Toscani: The many colours of ‘the dress’, Current Biology 25, R1–R3, June 15, 2015

DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.04.043 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2015.04.043

Dr. David Connah presenting at Image Sensors 2015

Published:

Dr. David Connah will be speaking at the Image Sensors conference, taking place in London, UK, March 17-19th 2015.

Dr. Connah will be speaking about "Image Fusion - how to make best use of broad spectrum data" and will describe challenges in fusing multiple data channels into one single image for display, as well as the problem of mapping N-D inputs to 3-D (RGB) outputs. The solutions described will be shown to have applications in hyperspectral remote sensing, fusion of colour and near-infrared images and colour visualisation of MRI Diffusion-Tensor images.

The conference aims to bring together industry leaders in image sensor technology from across Europe, Asia and the US.

Additional information about the conference can be found here.

IET Lecture: Visual Computing Technologies and Applications - Working with Big Industries

Published:

Prof. Rami Qahwaji, along with Dr. Omar Ashamari and Dr. MhD Saeed Sharif, will be presenting an IET (Institute of Engineering and Technology) lecture, which will take place at the University of Bradford on 19th February 2015.

Visual computing technologies deal with real-life data captured by a variety of sensors. The data could be complex, huge, multi-dimensional, multi-wave length, noisy, etc. Image/signal processing, machine learning and 3D modelling technologies work together to improve the quality of data and produce useful information and/or knowledge that can be used for variety of applications such as Big Data, Modelling, Prediction, Diagnostics, visualisation, etc.

Prof. Qahwaji, Dr. Ashamari and Dr. Sharif, will be introducing some of the technologies and applications they have developed in the field of visual computing in close collaboration with industries such as the NHS and the European Space Agency (ESA).

Venue: Room GTA JSB, Richmond, Bradford University.

Program:

1800: Refreshments

18:30PM-20:30PM: Lecture

Please register online at IET's website here (free of charge).

For Additional information please contact Prof. Rami at R.S.R.Qahwaji@bradford.ac.uk

CVC at Cyberworlds 2015

Published:

Members and students of the CVC will be presenting at Cyberworlds 2015 taking place in Gotland, Sweden, October 7-9th 2015.

Prof. Rae Earnshaw is invited to talk at Cyberworlds 2015 which is titled 'Ten Unsolved Problems with the Internet of Things'.

Alongside Prof. Earnshaw, Prof. Hassan Ugail will be presenting a collaborative work with Lei Liu, Yun Sheng and Guixu Zhang, titled 'Graph cut based mesh segmentation using feature points and geodesic distance'.

Zahra Sayed, PhD student at CVC, will also be presenting her recent research in 3D modelling of Islamic Geometric Motifs titled 'Parameterized Shape Grammar for Generating n-fold Islamic Geometric Motifs', which is supervised by Prof. Hassan Ugail, Dr.Carlton Reeve and Dr. Jon Purdy (University of Hull).

A full programme of the conference can be found here.

What will my Baby look like?

Published:

Prof. Hassan Ugail & Ali Bukar will speak at the British Science Festival at the University of Bradford.

Prof. Ugail and Ali Bukar, will be introducing a computer algorithm that will be able to predict the appearance of their children in different stages of life.

Location: Richmond F21

Date and Time: Thu 10 Sep 2015, 10:00 - 11:00

See more details of the event.

Please book online to reserve (free of charge).

Congratulations to Nur Baini Ismail

Published:

The staff and students at the CVC would like to congratulate Nur Baini Ismail who successfully defended her PhD thesis on the 15th September.

nur-ismael viva

Nur's thesis was on the subject of "Modelling Facial Action Units using Partial Differential Equations", and was done in collaboration with supervisor Prof. Hassan Ugail.

The thesis examination panel comprised Dr Nader Anani (Sheffield Hallam University, external examiner), Dr Tao Wan(Media Design and Technology - MDT, internal examiner) and Prof.John Sweeney (School of Engineering, independent chair).

Nur's PhD was sponsored by government of Malaysia and she will be returning back to the Malaysia to continue her work there. We wish Nur every success in her career.

Ali Bukar presenting at the 5th International Conference on Image Processing Theory, Tools and Applications 2015

Published:

Ali Bukar will be speaking at the 5th International Conference on Image Processing Theory, Tools and Applications, taking place in Orleans, France, 10-13 November 2015.

Ali Bukar will be presenting his work on an "Individualised Model of Facial Age Synthesis Based on Constrained".

The conference aims to bring together international researchers, innovators, educators, and practitioners in image processing to share their achievements, exchange their experience and discuss future orientations.

New Equipment strengthens Solid Dosage Form Development expertise at CPES.

Published:

The Centre has recently purchased a range of new "state of the art" solid dosage form processing equipment to enhance its capabilities and expertise in Solid Dosage Form Research and Development for both pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products, including a new tablet press, roller compactor and high shear granulator. The new instruments will be fully installed by the end of November 2015.

The centre has purchased a new laboratory scale 8 station tableting press (Figure 1 Mini Press II, Karnavati Engineering Limited). This table top tableting machine is the ultimate solution for laboratory/R&D use and small batch production. In addition we now have available a new roller compactor (Figure 2, KERC-200/50, Karnavati Engineering Limited) and a High Shear Granulator (Figure 3, Mini RMG, Karnavati Engineering Limited) ideal for technical batches and optimisation studies.

Solid Dosage Form Processing Equipment

CPES celebrates PhD success in 2015

Published:

The Centre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Science has the pleasure of announcing that in 2015 seven of it's post graduate students have successfully completed their PhD's. Congratulations go to; Sudhir K. Pagire, Rohan Ambardekar, Parineeta Banedar, Shivprasad Deshmukh, Hrushikesh Karandikar, Sachin Korde and Prafulla Aphshingekar.

229 x 235

CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Sudhir K. Pagire has successfully completed his PhD. Sudhir’s thesis is entitled “Novel Methods for Co-crystallisation”, Sudhir is currently working as a Knowledge Transfer Associate with CPES at the University of Bradford.

‌‌

Rohan Ambardekar photo 2015

‌CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Rohan Ambardekar has successfully completed his PhD. Rohan’s thesis is entitled “Controlled drug release from oriented biodegradable polymers”. Rohan is currently working as Sr. Formulation Scientist at Nemaura Pharma Ltd, Loughborough.

Parineeta Banedar photo 2015

CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Parineeta Banedar has successfully completed her PhD. Parineeta’s thesis is entitled “A Raman spectroscopic study of solid dispersions and co - crystals during the pharmaceutical hot melt extrusion process”.

236 x 260

CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Shivprasad Deshmukh has successfully completed his PhD. Shivprasad’s thesis is entitled “Investigation of Injection Moulding for Novel Drug Delivery Systems”. Shivprasad is currently working as a KTP associate at AstraZeneca in collaboration with CPES, University of Bradford.

Sachin Korde photo 2015

‌CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Sachin Korde has successfully completed his PhD. Sachin’s thesis is entitled “Solvent free technologies for polymer based crystal engineering and drug delivery”. Sachin is currently working as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at CPES, University of Bradford.

222 x 230

CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Hrushikesh Karandikar has successfully completed his PhD. Hrushikesh’s thesis is entitled “Suitability of cellulose ester derivatives in hot melt extrusion”. Hrushikesh is currently working as a Research and Commercialisation Officer at CPES, University of Bradford.

Prafulla Aphshingekar photo 2015

‌CPES has the pleasure of announcing that Prafulla Aphshingekar has successfully completed his PhD. Prafulla’s thesis is entitled “Applications of Ultrasound in pharmaceutical processing and analytics”. Prafulla is currently working as a Scientist at PharMaterials Ltd, Reading, UK.

Novel Abuse Resistant Controlled Drug Delivery Systems

Published:

Scientists at the University of Bradford have invented a novel polymer matrix system that can be used to prepare novel abuse resistant drug delivery systems.

This novel polymer matrix system comprises biocompatible, biodegradable, GRAS status, pharmaceutically acceptable, readily available and inexpensive materials that can be used to prepare novel drug delivery systems using readily scalable and efficient hot melt extrusion or micro moulding processing techniques. When the matrix is prepared with drug substance, the resultant drug product will have the desired quality attributes required by the FDA for Abuse Resistant Systems (Tier 1) and have been shown to comply with the FDA’s required product characteristics in terms of ability to crush and ease of extraction (see preliminary data below). The prototype formulations also release the full drug loading over a 12hr period and the rate of release can be modified by changing the blend of matrix components. In addition, the novel polymer matrix can be formed into microneedles for controlled transdermal drug delivery using micro injection moulding processing techniques.

New Equipment and Capabilities

Published:

New Equipment and Capabilities strengthens Pharmaceutical Formulation Development expertise at CPES.

‌The Centre has recently purchased a number of state of the art formulation processing and analytical instruments to increase its capabilities in Pharmaceutical Formulation Research and Development, including a new freeze dryer, high shear granulator, Surface Energy Analyser and a Dynamic Vapor Sorption Analyser.

The centre has purchased a new laboratory scale bench-top Freeze dryer (Virtis “Advantage Pro” with intellitronics) and a new bench-top granulator (High Shear Mixer GMX-Lab Micro with 1L and 4L capacity, Freund Vector) to enhance its range of Enabling Process Technologies.

iGC Surface Analyser (SMS)

In addition, the centre has purchased an iGC Surface Energy Analyser including film surface analysis options (SMS) and a Dynamic Vapour Sorption Analyser (SMS Intrinsic) to boost the capabilities in Solid State Analytics at CPES.

Latest paper in CrystEngComm

Published:

Microwave assisted synthesis of caffeine/maleic acid co-crystals: the role of the dielectric and physicochemical properties of the solvent

Sudhir Pagire, Sachin Korde, Rohan Ambardekar, Shivprasad Deshmukh, Radha Charan Dash, Ravindra Dhumal and Anant Paradkar

CrystEngComm, 2013,15, 3705-3710
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE40292D
Received 07 Dec 2012, Accepted 26 Feb 2013
First published online 26 Feb 2013

Full press release can be viewed on University of Bradford Media Centre page.

For further information please contact Prof. Anant Paradkar on 01274 233900 or a.paradkar1@bradford.ac.uk.

Latest Paper from CPES accepted in International Journal of Pharmaceutics

Published:

Synthetic identification of thermal degradation products of HPCMP during hot melt extrusion

Authors: Hrushikesh Karandikar, Rohan Ambardekar, Adrian Kelly, Tim Gough, Anant Paradkar

Int. J. Pharm, 2015, Accepted Manuscript DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.04.007

Novel non-hygroscopic effervescent formulations

Published:

Scientists at the University of Bradford have recently developed a non hygroscopic effervescent formulation which increases the stability of the formulation in the presence of small amounts of moisture in the atmosphere and addresses the challenges in effervescent product manufacturing, packaging and subsequent storage.

The global market for effervescent products is estimated in the multi $billion and covers a wide range of industries including pharmaceutical, healthcare and household cleaning. However, the manufacture of effervescent formulations (powders/tablets) is not straight-forward as moisture in the atmosphere leads to the initiation of the neutralisation reaction between the key ingredients, degrading the product and rendering unusable. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that organic acids are hygroscopic and readily absorb moisture from the atmosphere; this is enhanced when the acids are mixed with other excipients typical of most formulations. As a consequence manufacturing is performed at low humidity in specialist units in which the level of moisture is regulated. The controlled thermo-hygrometric conditions, high maintenance cost of processing equipment and special packaging materials make manufacturing of effervescent preparation expensive and challenging.

The Centre's latest publications

Published:

Including crystal growth, artemisinin and cocrystals

  1. Spherical Crystallization of Carbamazepine/Saccharin Co-Crystals:Selective Agglomeration and Purification through Surface Interactions

    Cryst. Growth Des, Accepted manuscript

    Sudhir K. Pagire, Sachin A. Korde, Benjamin R. Whiteside, John Kendrick and Anant Paradkar

  2. Polymorphic transformation of artemisinin by high temperature extrusion

    CrystEngComm, 2013,15, 6297-6300

    Chaitrali Kulkarni, John Kendrick, Adrian Kelly, Tim Gough, Radha Charan Dash and Anant Paradkar

  3. Microwave assisted synthesis of caffeine/maleic acid cocrystals: the role of the dielectric and physicochemical properties of the solvent

    CrystEngComm, 2013, 15, 3705 DOI: 10.1039/c3ce40292d

    Sudhir Pagire, Sachin Korde, Rohan Ambardekar, Shivprasad Deshmukh, Radha Charan Dash, Ravindra Dhumal and Anant Paradkar

MERCK PhD Studentship available - starting October 2013

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MERCK PhD Studentship available - starting October 2013

We are delighted to accounce we have a MERCK funded PhD 3 Year Studentship Award available starting October 2013.

Research paper produced by our MSc students

Published:

Osama Mahmah and Rami Tabbakh - MSc students produce new research paper

Sama Mahmah and Rami Tabbakh, our MSc Project students have successful submitted their research findings to The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

Many congratulations!

Our latest article in European Pharmaceutical Manufacturer

Published:

Increased Bioavailability Using New Formulation Technology

Prof. Anant Paradkar presents results from our Centre using Hot Melt Extrusion technology to increase bioavailability and describes our partnership with Aesica Pharmaceuticals in European Pharmaceutical Manufacturer magazine.

Polymorphic transformation of artemisinin by high temperature extrusion

Published:

Latest paper to be accepted by CrystEngComm

Polymorphic transformation of artemisinin by high temperature extrusion

Anant Paradkar, Chaitrali Kulkarni, John Kendrick, Adrian Kelly, Tim Gough and Radha Charan Dash
CrystEngComm, 2013, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE40726H
Received 25 Apr 2013, Accepted 10 Jun 2013
First published online 11 Jun 2013

Health from Honey Bees School Event

Published:

Dr Riddhi Shukla and Mr James Machell visited Laisterdyke Business and Enterprise College on 18th January to teach students about "Health from Honey Bees"

Riddhi and James went to visit Laisterdyke Business and Enterprise College to talk to year 8 pupils about formulation and the work the University is doing to develop health products from propolis.

The pupils learnt more about honey bees and how raw materials produced by honey bees in particular propolis are transformed into healthcare products.

Feedback from the pupils was very positive with pupils' commenting on how they enjoyed the session.

Collaboration with Arterius Ltd

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Exciting New Collaboration with Arterius Ltd

The Centre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Science is delighted to announce a new collaborative relationship with Arterius Ltd to develop a prototype biodegradable coronary stent.

Novel Solvent-Free Method to Manufacture Metastable Drug Forms

Published:

Prof. Anant Paradkar describes research carried out at our Centre to develop a solvent-free, continuous method to manufacture the more soluble and bioavailable form of artemisinin.

The metastable form is produced using high-temperature extrusion and has been shown to have greater stability and longer shelf-life.

The full article can be read at PharmTech.com.

Dr Adrian Kelly to present at upcoming Shin Etsu Technical Seminar

Published:

Dr Adrian Kelly to present at upcoming Shin Etsu Technical Seminar in Wiesbaden, Germany

Dr Adrian Kelly will be presenting on Wednesday 11th December at the Shin Etsu Technical Seminar - Novel Applications using cellulose derivatives in solid dosage being held at The Crown Plaza hotel in Wiesbaden, Germany.

Adrian's talk is titled "Technical presentation HME and Injection moulding".

Article in Crystal Growth and Design

Published:

New publication on Crystal Growth and Design

We are delighted to announce our latest publication:

Mechanism for Polymorphic Transformation of Artemisinin during High Temperature Extrusion in Crystal Growth and Design.

Chaitrali Kulkarni, Adrian Kelly, John Kendrick, Tim Gough, and Anant Paradkar

Events at the British Science Festival 2011

Published:

Centre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Science Events held as part of the 2011 British Science Festival in Bradford

British Science Festival Header

The British Science Festival is one of Europe's largest science festivals and it came to Bradford in 2011!

The Centre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Science, based at the University of Bradford held two events as part of this prestigious festival on Monday 12th September 2011 focusing on Health from Honey Bees.

Health from Honey Bees Exhibition was held from 9.00am until 3.00pm in the Atrium of Richmond Building, University of Bradford, BD7 1DP.

The exhibition was a great success and had visitors buzzing with interest! We had over 100 visitors come to view our stand and talk with our scientists and James Fearnley (our partner from Natures Laboratory) to learn more about the work we were carrying out converting raw products from honey bees into healthcare products.

CPES student explaining stand to visitors

Apiceutical Research Centre mock up

Display stand Group photo at stand

Group photo at stand

Visitors coming to stand

The event was over subscribed and we had 130 audience members that came to learn about:

- How do honey bees naturally produce products that have health benefits?
- How bee products (apiceuticals) are transformed into new medicines and healthcare products for human and animal health
- The art of bee-keeping from the University of Bradford bee-keepers with audience participation in making candles

Introduction to event presentation

James' presentation

The feedback showed that 98% of attendees were impressed with the overall event - next time we shall use a bigger hall!

CPES student showcasing products

Presentation from event

Photo of audience members

James' presentation

James presenting

Dr Riddhi Shukla and Prof. Anant Paradkar were also invited to present at a podcast with the X-change team at the British Science Association on day 4 of the British Science Festival event. To listen to our podcast please scroll to time 58:36.

Finally Prof. Anant Paradkar and James Fearnley were invited to attend a press conference with journalists on Thursday 15 September.

British Science Festival Logo 200x200

APS Amorphous by Design 2014 to be held at University of Bradford

Published:

The Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences (APS) will be holding their upcoming Amorphous by Design 2014 conference at the Norcroft Conference Centre at the University of Bradford on 28-29th April 2014.

The focus of the conference is:

Characterisation and Processing of Amorphous Materials

Fundamental characterisation of amorphous materials to move away from a trial and error approach and ensure robust manufacturing

We are very pleased that APS has chosen University of Bradford as the venue and we are delighted to showcase our facilties to the audience.

Prof. Anant Paradkar will be chairing a session and Dr Adrian Kelly will also be presenting.

Programme details

Funding workshop to be held on 26th Feb at University of Bradford

Published:

The Centre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Science (CPES) at the University of Bradford has been awarded Strategic Intervention (SI) project by the Yorkshire Innovation Fund (YIF) in the area of Green Processing Technologies. The aim of this project is to offer assistance to SMEs in pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, healthcare, personal care and agrochemical sector based in Yorkshire and Humber region. The main objective is to help SMEs improve their competitiveness to develop, adopt green processing technologies, achieve reduction in carbon footprint and product cost with a major impact in improving product quality and generating strong intellectual protection.

As a part of this funding CPES is going to organise six one day workshops at the University of Bradford and invite SMEs from Yorkshire and Humber region. The major focus of these workshops is to interact with the SMEs, identify the barriers exist for them to implement green processing technologies, provide details of green technologies with presentations, case studies, demonstrations and showcase green technologies used or have developed at the University. At these workshops projects with SMEs will be identified and awarded funds up to value of £35K to encourage them to implement green processes or technologies. We have £205K worth of funding to allocate to such projects with no financial contribution from the company required as this is a European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) project. In addition CPES is able to offer 12 hours of free consultancy and preliminary development work to a limited number of SMEs.

Our first workshop will be held on Wednesday 26th February 2014 at the University of Bradford. If you are an SME based in Yorkshire and Humber region and are interested in this opportunity for free support and funding, please do not hesitate to contact:

Dr Riddhi Shukla E-mail: R.Y.Shukla@bradford.ac.uk Phone: 01274 23 5571

Professor Anant Paradkar E-mail: A.Paradkar1@bradford.ac.uk Phone: 01274 23 3900

n-able receives national accolade

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n-able, the network for promoting disability equality has been named Network Leader of the Year 2015.

The Inclusive Networks awards ceremony was held in Manchester, where the network leaders Gill Cockburn and Cath Rose were celebrated for the time and passion they dedicate to ensuring that disabled staff issues are firmly on the University’s agenda.

The Inclusive Networks website says Gill and Cath "have provided successful events every year to raise awareness and celebrate disability. They talk about the network at any opportunity, whether they are in a meeting about Equality and Diversity or the IT Strategy or a lunch meeting with prospective students."

Rapid methods for detecting bacteria at the bedside

Published:

Professor Stephen Rimmer, Head of School of Chemistry and Forensic Sciences.

Over use of antibiotics is probably the biggest heath issue facing the world in the 21st century.

Failure to address the problem will lead to a post antibiotic era in which people die of common ailments such as tooth decay and serious diseases such as TB will range unchecked. A key requirement for better control of antibiotics is providing faster and greater information to clinicians.

At the moment too much time is lost while laboratories work on infected samples obtained from swabbing and the central technique is to grow bacteria in the laboratory. Trained staff then use their skills to identify the type of bacteria using microscopy but other laboratory techniques such as staining are used as well. All of this takes time and for the seriously ill this is time that cannot be wasted. The result is that antibiotics have to be prescribed with only symptom level knowledge of the patient’s condition. Of course a microbiology laboratory may not be available anyway and this is especially the situation in the developing regions such as rural India. So there is a growing realisation that technologies that can be used to rapidly analyse samples from infected tissues in the clinic would provide the vital information that a clinician needs, hopefully in a much shorter timeframe than the current laboratory based culture methods. What is required are devices and materials that can provide both indications of the presence of bacteria and some level of identification. A good step forward would to have a system that can distinguish between the two main classes of bacteria: Gram –positive or Gram-negative.

Our multi-national team of scientists and clinicians including chemists at the University of Bradford, Biologists at the University of Sheffield and clinicians and scientists at the LV Prasad Institute and University of Hyderabad, India are developing advanced polymers that can disclose the two classes bacteria work is currently funded by both the Wellcome Trust, the MRC and DBT. We have also just completed a productive research programme in the area with global healthcare corporation Smith and Nephew. Much of the work is aimed at providing simple to use devices that can provide indications of infection within one hour and although much remains to be done considerable progress is being made that will be of major benefit to clinicians attempting to prescribe the correct and optimum treatments.

One of the advantages of this system is that it can be fabricated into many different types of device. This means that systems appropriate to most disease states can be developed. Much of the current work is aimed at infections in eyes and our estimates are that a successful adoption in India could save around 50% of eyes that are currently lost.

The system builds on some ground breaking observations made by us in the over the last 20 years. We were the first to show that a synthetic polymer could respond to the presence of bacteria and critically whether the polymer responds or not depends on its design. Using a synthetic polymer we can design polymers that only respond to Gram-positive bacteria and others that respond only to Gram-negative bacteria. It should also be possible, with a good deal of further research, to develop specific systems for particular species or even strains. Obviously we would very much like to be able to different between normal strains and multiple resistant strains such as MRSA. However, we need first to probe the detail of the biochemistry of targets such as MRSA because we need specific sites on the bacteria that are unique to that strain and then we will need to develop a polymer that binds only to these features. None-the-less with enough effort it should be possible to do this.

Simply differentiating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative provides very powerful information to the clinician, who armed with this information, can select appropriate antibiotics. This can have a big impact in the fight against resistance developing bacteria.

*The polymer system is a branched water soluble polymer (poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) with groups that bind to bacteria at the chain ends. When the ends bind to the bacteria water is lost from polymer and it shrinks from an open coil to a collapsed globule. Detection of the bacteria relies on methods that can detect the change from open coil to collapsed globule.

, Head of Chemistry and Forensic Sciences reacting to BBC News article.

Targeting DNA repair in metastatic prostate cancer

Published:

Professor Richard Morgan, Anniversary Chair in Molecular Oncology.

One of the most significant challenges in treating cancer is its heterogeneous nature — it is a disease with highly variable origins, mutations, and behaviour, and consequently it also varies considerably with respect to its response to treatment.

Thus, for example, although some cancers will be sensitive to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, others will be highly resistant. An alternative approach to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the use of "molecular targeted therapy", which has developed rapidly over the last 20 years.

Molecular targeted therapy involves the use of drugs or antibodies that target specific proteins in the cancer cell. These proteins usually have important roles in cancer cells, for example in promoting cell division, but are generally less important in normal adult cells. Although targeted therapy has had a number of notable and dramatic successes in cancer treatment, a continuing problem is how to determine which cancers will be sensitive to these drugs, and hence which patients will derive the most benefit.

In the recent study "DNA-Repair Defects and Olaparib in Metastatic Prostate Cancer" Joaquin Mateo and colleagues addressed the problem of identifying prostate cancer patients who would derive the greatest clinical benefit from olaparib, a drug that specifically targets a protein called PARP. PARP repairs DNA after it has been damaged, and generally cancer cells suffer DNA damage more frequently than normal cells, although this varies significantly between different tumours. Mateo and colleagues studied 50 patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer: men whose disease has spread, and no longer responds to the standard therapy for this disease, which is to deprive the cancer cells of androgen through either removal of the testicles or by drugs that block androgen function.

These patients were treated with olaparib tablets at a dose of 400 mg twice daily, and the researchers measured the response to treatment by looking for a reduction of at least 50% in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, or fewer tumour cells in the blood. The hypothesis tested by the researchers was that cancers showing a reduced ability to repair DNA damage would be more dependent on PARP, and thus more sensitive to olaparib. They therefore examined tumour samples for mutations or other genetic changes that stopped key DNA repair genes from working. Overall, 33% of the patients showed a response to olaparib treatment. However, 16 of the 50 patients were found to have cancers with mutations in DNA repair genes, and of these 14 (88%) had a response to olaparib. The authors concluded that the inactivation of DNA repair genes was a marker for olaparib sensitivity, and could form the basis of a test to select patients who would benefit from this treatment.

Although these findings are promising, there are a number of problems that need to be considered. Despite the very specific nature of olaparib, it still has side effects, as 20% of the patients suffered anaemia, and 12% suffered fatigue. However, the most significant barrier to the widespread clinical use of this test is an economic one. Although olaparib was previously shown to be effective in ovarian cancer, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) considers it to be too expensive, at £4,000/month, to justify its use in this malignancy. In addition, the cost of testing for mutations in DNA repair genes is significant. Difficult decisions therefore lie ahead on the road to the widespread use of olaparib for patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

Prof Richard Morgan, Professor of Molecular Oncology reacting to BBC News article.

We must prepare for a 30-year war in the Middle East

Published:

Paul Rogers, University of Bradford.

Twelve years ago, George W Bush gave his “Mission Accomplished” speech from the flight deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier, confident that the Saddam Hussein regime had been consigned to the dustbin of history, the Taliban regime had been terminated, al-Qaeda was dispersed, if not destroyed, and the desperately needed New American Century was back on track.

That’s what he thought. Instead, over the following decade, hundreds of thousands died in the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.

In the past two years, the latest manifestation of al-Qaeda’s terrorist ideology, Islamic State, has grown apace to affect millions of people across north-east Syria and north-west Iraq, even in the face of an intensive air campaign against them. The US air war, Operation Inherent resolve, has – according to the latest figures from the US Department of Defense – involved more than 8,125 airstrikes and has hit more than 16,000 targets. An estimated 20,000 IS supporters have been killled, yet the number of fighters that IS can deploy – between 20,000 and 30,000 – is unchanged.

Moreover, the assessment of US intelligence agencies last year that 15,000 people from 80 countries had joined IS and other extreme groups has been raised to 30,000 from 100 countries.

George W Bush

Mission accomplished: George W Bush on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln, May 2003 US Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Tyler J. Clements

War is good for IS. It relentlessly portrays itself as the defender of Islam under attack from crusader forces as it creates a rigid and determined caliphate, a pernicious world view hated by the overwhelming majority of Muslims – yet appealing to a tiny minority that is still worth proselytising.

Until last spring, IS concentrated primarily on developing and protecting its proto-caliphate. But it has now taken a leaf out of the old al-Qaeda book and extended its operations overseas.

This has taken two forms – developing connections with like-minded groups: whether in Libya, Nigeria, the Caucasus, Afghanistan or within the Middle East – and fostering direct attacks on the “crusaders”, whether it’s the tourists killed at the Bardo Museum and the Sousse resort in Tunisia or, more recently, on the Russian Metrojet, and during the horrific attacks in Paris last weekend.

bomb components

Image published in Islamic State ‘Dabiq’ magazine shows according to IS the components that were used to build the bomb that brought down the Russian Metrojet. Dabiq

As IS no doubt hoped, France has reacted with renewed air strikes in Syria, and across the West there is talk of an expanded air war and even the use of ground troops. This will be music to the ears of the IS leadership. Some of them will be killed but what does that matter when they are part of a divine plan? Moreover, if their acolytes can carry out more attacks then there is a real chance of rampant Islamophobia evolving rapidly in France and elsewhere, with all the recruitment potential that it provides.

What should the West do?

If we follow the logic of IS wanting war and suggest quietly that it might not be a good idea, then the inevitable response is: “What should we do?”. It is not enough to say, for example, that we should not have invaded Iraq in the first place, true though that is. There are, though, some clear steps that can be taken to start the multi-year process of curbing IS.

An early priority is putting far greater emphasis on ending the Syrian civil war, the necessary precursor to constraining IS in Syria. There are some small signs of progress here with the two recent meetings in Vienna involving all the proxies to the war including Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. But the process must be accelerated and, however difficult, Assad and key militia leaders must somehow be engaged. It is the most difficult of all the tasks and will require the best skills of highly competent conflict resolution specialists.

Fighter

Nusra Front fighter: just one of the many factions fighting in Syria and Iraq. Reuters/Ammar Abdullah

Close behind that in importance will be a huge and immediate effort to aid the 3m or more refugees from Syria and Iraq, principally in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, many of them facing an appalling winter while the UNHCR and other agencies struggle to provide support. The core motive must be humanitarian – but if help is not provided, these camps also will provide a remarkable recruiting ground for IS.

A third element is to work as hard as possible to encourage the Abadi government in Baghdad to reach out to the Sunni minority, especially in those many parts of Iraq where persistent neglect of that minority is helping maintain support for IS.

Finally, there is the issue of the expansion of IS, not least in Libya. The need to support UN attempts to bring stability to that country is urgent yet seriously lacking at present.

In this context, perhaps the most urgent need for any state seriously interested in preventing the further growth of extreme Islamist movements is to foster a change in the repressive policies of the Sisi government in Egypt. With more than 1,000 Muslim Brotherhood supporters killed and well over 10,000 imprisoned, many under sentence of death, this is the one country that is ripe for Islamist expansionism.

None of these measures provides anything like a full answer to the many challenges of IS but they collectively point us in a different direction. We have recently entered the 15th year of what used to be called the “War on Terror” – and that war is about to intensify with little thought about the long-term effects or the reasons for past failures. If we do not take a new direction then we should prepare for a 30-year war.

Paul Rogers, Professor of Peace Studies, University of Bradford.
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Bradford's Midwifery Society has been shortlisted for the Student Midwife Award

Published:

The University of Bradford's Midwifery Society has been shortlisted for the Student Midwife Award

The Student Midwife Award from the Royal College of Midwives showcases the very best in innovation and evidence-based projects and applauds excellence in midwifery.

The Bradford society was created during the summer of 2014, its founding members are Abbie Milnes - President, Gemma Sykes – Publicity and Marketing, Kate Redmond-Mortimer – Charity Ambassador, Rosie Turner – Secretary and Treasurer and Catherine Wheatley- Liaison Officer, all are 2nd year student midwives at the University of Bradford.

Abbie Milnes said: “The Society was established to support and unite midwifery students and professionals, and create a dynamic and energetic forum for shared learning and development.

“The impact of the society continues to grow in momentum, creating a global village that empowers individuals. This strength and passion leads to greater advocacy for women; best practice and informed choice; commitment and compassionate care for all.”

The society has created inspirational study days and has taken part in national events that enhance knowledge, promote excellence and encourage diversity. It has facilitated events that are of interest to current students and midwives.

The society have two events coming up, ‘Keeping high risk birth ‘normal’’ on December 17 and ‘The Roar Behind The Silence’ book launch on 18 March 2015.

The Award ceremony will take place on March 3.

Further information about the society and future events can be found at http://uobmidwiferysociet.wix.com/uobmidwiferysociety or by liking UoB Midwifery Society on Facebook

Revamped drug may overcome resistance in brain tumours

Published:

Cancer Research UK scientists have taken major steps to overcome drug resistance in glioblastoma, the most common type of brain tumour in adults, according to research published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.

Scientists at the University of Bradford, along with colleagues in the USA and Finland, have created a modified version of the cancer drug temozolomide, the first-line treatment for glioblastoma.

The Cancer Research UK team has shown in the laboratory that the revamped drug – called DP68 – is better than temozolomide at killing cancer cells. And it significantly reduced the regrowth of tumour cells that had become resistant to temozolomide.

Glioblastomas account for more than a quarter of all primary brain tumours, with around 2,500 people diagnosed with the disease every year in the UK.

Cancer Research UK led on the development of temozolomide, which marked an important breakthrough in the treatment of glioblastoma. It has become the international standard of care for thousands of patients with this type of cancer. But in many cases the cancer cells become resistant. And, once the disease returns, it is very hard to treat.

Study author, Dr Richard Wheelhouse, based at the University of Bradford, said: “Temozolomide is a widely-used treatment for patients with glioblastoma. But, when resistance to the drug develops, the tumours often grow back more aggressively so it’s crucial to find new ways of outmanoeuvring the cancer cells.

“DP68 could become a vital treatment for glioblastoma patients who’ve developed resistance to the first-line treatment. It’s still early days but, unlike temolozomide that’s only used to treat gliomas, we hope this new version of the drug may benefit patients with other cancer types.”

Professor Peter Johnson, Cancer Research UK’s chief clinician, said: “We still need to do much more research in the treatment of brain tumours, where progress has been painfully slow. It is very encouraging to think that this drug might be helpful for people whose cancer stops responding to treatment. Innovative research like this is crucial to find vital new treatments to improve survival.”

Top global green ranking for University of Bradford

Published:

The University of Bradford's green credentials have been underlined by a top ten world environmental ranking.

The University has been placed sixth in the world in the UI GreenMetric World University Rankings 2014, which have just been announced. Bradford is also the fourth-ranked university in the UK.

The rankings looked at 360 universities from 62 countries that made submissions – up from 301 universities last year. They examined universities’ performance across a number of categories, including transport, water usage, waste management, energy and climate change, green statistics and education.

The accolade adds to Bradford’s impressive green achievements, which include regular Green League first class performance, Business in the Community Environmental Index Platinum, EcoCampus accreditation, Universities That Count first place, multiple Green Gown awards triumphs and national industry awards wins including from Green Build and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers.

Among the continued improvements and developments that have kept Bradford at the top of the rankings are:

  • A major refurbishment of the library and construction of our flagship Bright Building and STEM building (science, technology, engineering and maths) – both receiving BREEAM Outstanding* and the STEM building achieving Passivhaus status. These developments showcase sustainable construction techniques and innovative design.

  • Continued carbon footprint reductions have achieved a 34 per cent reduction since 2005, great progress towards the University’s target of 50 per cent by 2020.

  • The University’s partnership with Cycle Hub, Green Energy Challenge and Edible Campus (areas of fruit, vegetables and herbs available to be harvested by students and staff).

Bradford’s Director of Estates and Facilities, Clive Wilson, said: “We are delighted and proud once again to be recognised as one of the most sustainable universities in the world. We have an ambitious and visionary programme that is embedding sustainable development across everything that we do, involving all our staff, students, visitors and the wider community around the University.

“We call this programme Ecoversity and as well as creating a wonderful place in which to study and work, it addresses our social and environmental responsibilities extremely effectively.”

More information on the GreenMetric rankings can be found at http://greenmetric.ui.ac.id/ranking/year/2014

*BREEAM - Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology – is the world's foremost environmental assessment method and rating system for buildings.

University of Bradford offers unique dementia assessment teaching

Published:

The University of Bradford's School of Dementia Studies is offering a unique programme of teaching in the assessment and diagnosis of dementia.

The postgraduate certificate in dementia for practitioners with a special interest is the first of its kind in England. It is designed for practitioners from a variety of clinical backgrounds, including GPs and nurses, providing diagnostic services and ongoing support for people with dementia.

The programme, led by Dr Sarah Smith, is the first to incorporate research concerning the application of conversational techniques to help determine whether or not patients have dementia.

The technique aims to reduce stress on the patient during the assessment process, obtaining as much information as possible from verbal and non-verbal cues during the conversation. The technique can be used to complement standard tests used in the diagnosis of dementia.

Developed with input from the Royal College of GPs, study involves both face-to-face and online distance learning. The programme is intended for groups of health professionals from single localities supported by a commissioning group or NHS trust.

The programme, and the research informing it, stems from recent government reports identifying the need for earlier and timelier diagnosis for people with dementia. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia report in 2012 identified the need for diagnosis to be embedded in local communities.

Dr Danielle Jones, Lecturer in Dementia Studies, said: “The research that we have incorporated into this programme really is cutting edge and we are delighted that we have been able to apply it to practice-based teaching. The programme upskills practitioners and provides the skills and knowledge to enable them to undertake person-centred assessments that really support the wellbeing of people.”

Bradford receives £1m to help lower hospital admissions

Published:

The University of Bradford has received £1million to develop and test an intervention that will reduce avoidable hospital admissions from care homes.

The study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), is led by Professor Murna Downs, Head of the School of Dementia Studies with the University’s Faculty of Health Studies, and will begin in March 2015 to be completed by June 2018.

Professor Murna Downs, said: “Reducing rates of hospitalisation for Ambulatory Care Sensitive (ACS) conditions is a government priority. ACS conditions, if not actively managed, can lead to unplanned hospital admissions, which are costly to the NHS and distressing to the person, their family and nursing home staff.

“Nursing home residents are amongst the frailest and most vulnerable members of society. Most have complex health care needs and more than two thirds have dementia. Spotting early changes in residents’ health is essential to ensure active management of ACS conditions in nursing homes.”

Research carried out in 2012 from a Programme Development Grant (PDG) identified multi-component interventions which, when tested in US nursing homes, showed promise in reducing avoidable admissions. They involved a combination of skills enhancement of nurses and care assistants, clinical guidance and decision-support tools, family involvement and implementation support.

Professor Downs and her team will build on these findings and test the outcomes in a UK setting. She will use the NIHR funding to carry out a two-stage research programme with the aim of reducing avoidable hospital admissions.

Professor Downs added: “With this funding we hope to develop and test guidance for care homes, which has the potential to reduce avoidable hospital admissions. Here at Bradford, we are committed to carrying out cutting-edge research that improves lives and addresses some of the biggest issues in society today, including an aging population.”

The funding will enable the researchers to work in collaboration with primary and secondary care clinicians, nursing home staff and family members to develop clinical guidance and decision support systems for UK nursing homes. They will also determine the best methods to enhance the skills of nursing home staff and clarify the role of family members. Finally the grant will enable the researchers to design the implementation support and guidance for the intervention.

In stage two of the programme, they will test the new guidance in two nursing homes in Bradford. They will then conduct a pilot evaluation in 16 nursing homes in Bradford and London to determine the impact of the guidance on avoidable hospital admissions and on a range of resident, staff, family and system-related secondary outcomes.

In this second stage they will also receive stakeholder feedback. If the results suggest that the intervention reduces avoidable admissions from nursing homes, they will seek further funding to evaluate the intervention in a larger number of nursing homes around the country.

Professor Downs will work with a range of researchers from across the country on the project (listed below). This includes working with research network volunteers from the Alzheimer's Society

Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Alzheimer’s Society is thrilled to see our Research Network volunteers playing an integral role in shaping this important research.

“Through sharing their real-life experiences of caring for someone with dementia, our volunteers are adding tremendous value to the research by ensuring that it is well designed and stands the best chance of maximising benefits for people with the condition. In this case, their involvement will ensure that the research findings will result in practical ways to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions.”

Notes

This study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research Programme Grants for Applied Research (NIHR PGfAR) Programme (ref: RP-PG-0612-20010).

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (www.nihr.ac.uk).

Research team: M Downs (University of Bradford), E Sampson (University College London), K Froggatt (Lancaster University), B McCormack (Queen Margaret University), B Woodward-Carlton (PPI representative, Alzheimer’s Society Research Network), S Nurock (PPI representative, Alzheimer’s Society Research Network), L Robinson (University of Newcastle), C Ballard (Kings College London), H Gage (University of Surrey), G Rait (University College London), R Hunter (University College London), N Freemantle (University College London), J Young (Bradford Institute for Health Research) and J Wright (Bradford Institute for Health Research).

Baroness Taylor to take up Chair role at University of Bradford

Published:

The Right Honourable Baroness Ann Taylor PC has been appointed Chair of Council at the University of Bradford.

Baroness Taylor will take up her appointment on 1 August 2015, chairing the governing body that oversees the delivery of the University’s strategy and its effective governance and management. She succeeds Paul Jagger MBE, who has been Chair of Council since 2006.

Baroness Taylor has a long association with Bradford, having graduated with a BSc in Politics and History from the University in 1969. She also received an Honorary Doctorate of the University in 1997 for her public life and political achievements.

She is one of The Labour Party’s most experienced politicians, beginning her political career as MP for Bolton West in 1974, serving more recently as MP for Dewsbury.

She has held many senior positions both in government and opposition, including Shadow Secretary of State for Education and Shadow Leader of the House of Commons. She became Leader of the House of Commons in 1997 before being appointed Government Chief Whip.

She was Chair of the Intelligence and Security Committee from 2001-2005 and became a Life Peer in 2005. She has since served as a Government Minister in the House of Lords, as Minister for Defence Equipment and Support and Minister for International Defence and Security. She has also served as a Representative on the Council of Europe and the Western European Union.

Outside politics she is a non-executive Director of Thales SA and Board Member of the National Mining Museum.

Baroness Taylor said: “I am delighted to be returning to Bradford. I was inspired to study here when Prime Minister Harold Wilson was Chancellor. There was real excitement that the new universities were to be part of the ‘white heat’ of the technological revolution and I wanted to be part of that.

“I am looking forward very much to playing an active role in what will be an exciting future for the University of Bradford and being part of the University’s 50th anniversary celebrations.”

The University’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “We are delighted to be welcoming someone of Baroness Taylor’s stature and experience to lead our Council and take up such a pivotal role for the University.

“She brings tremendous knowledge and wisdom to the University, including in the fields of education and the environment. Her international experience and her knowledge of politics at the highest level will be a wonderful asset.

“Baroness Taylor joins us at an incredibly exciting time as we prepare to celebrate our 50th anniversary. We look forward to benefiting from her leadership and wise counsel as we continue to drive forward our reputation as a great technology university carrying out world-leading research.

“I would also like to thank and pay tribute to our outgoing Chair, Paul Jagger. Paul has had a long association with the University, first as Pro-Chancellor before becoming Chair in 2006. During his tenure the University has continued to go from strength to strength. He has also made a significant contribution to the wider higher education sector.”

New Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford

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Alzheimer's Society has announced the launch of a new dementia-focused Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford.

The Centre will further enhance the University’s international reputation for person-centred care and services research by funding seven PhD students to develop new ways to support people with dementia and their families and improve the quality of dementia care at times of transition.

There are significantly fewer scientists working in dementia research than other conditions, with six times more people working in cancer than dementia. Alzheimer’s Society aims to attract new people to dementia research from a range of different academic and clinical backgrounds, bringing fresh ideas and talent to help expand the boundaries of dementia science.

The doctoral studies at Bradford will all focus on improving care at points of transition for people affected by dementia. One of the doctoral studies at Bradford will be establishing best practice when people with dementia move from being cared for in hospital to care homes. Difficulty at this point of transition has been cited as a factor in the recent A&E crisis. Another project will research effective ways of supporting South Asian families in managing behavioural difficulties in a relative with dementia. Numbers of people with dementia of South Asian ethnicity are growing and most live at home with their families, yet those families are less likely to access available services to assist them in caring.

The Doctoral Training Centre will include four doctorates funded by a £450,000 grant from Alzheimer’s Society, two funded by the University of Bradford and one by the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

The University of Bradford Centre is one of eight new specialist doctoral training centres around the country that are being co-ordinated and funded by Alzheimer’s Society. With matched funding from institutions, this represents nearly £5 million in new investment to support 55 PhDs and clinical fellows – the single biggest funding commitment to support early-career dementia researchers in the UK.

Murna Downs, Professor in , and Jan Oyebode, Professor of Dementia Care, who are the co-directors of the new Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Bradford said: We are delighted to have this significant investment in the future of person-centred care and services research at Bradford. It is timely to put the focus on transitions, as living with change is an inevitable feature of living with dementia. The doctoral researchers in our Centre will provide new knowledge to help people to effectively plan for and manage transitions in dementia care. “

Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Society said: “There’s a huge amount of progress being made by the dementia research community but unless we attract and train the best young talent we will limit how quickly we can make ground breaking discoveries. For too long dementia research has been underfunded and as a result we have significantly fewer scientists than other conditions.

“If we’re going to defeat dementia we need to give the best brains the right opportunities and build a research workforce that is fit for the future. That’s why we’re proud to be announcing the largest investment of its kind, which will see £5 million committed to create the next generation of dementia researchers. People with dementia deserve nothing less than an all-out fight back against the condition and our Doctoral Training Centres will help us enlist the right people to lead it.”

New multimillion India-UK research centres

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In a landmark collaboration, the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Government of India Department for Biotechnology (DBT), have joined forces to fund three major global research centres.

Using high quality research teams based in the UK and India, two of the centres will focus on research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and the other on cancer biology. Nearly £3.5million will be invested by the UK, through the MRC and the Newton Fund, with matched funding provided by DBT.

The centres will take a global perspective in tackling some of the largest global health problems of today and foster the next generation of researchers with specialist skills.

UK-India Centre for Advanced Technology for Minimising the indiscriminate use of Antibiotics (UKICAT-MA)

This centre will focus on finding solutions to the excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics. In partnership with the University of Bradford, University of Sheffield, and L V Prasad Eye Institute in India, the new centre will establish smart materials for the detection and targeted delivery of antibiotics for eye infections, and promote the use of these new technologies in other infective diseases.

The Cambridge-Chennai Centre Partnership on Antimicrobial Resistant Tuberculosis

A team of international researchers, from across a number of disciplines, will look to develop new diagnostic tools and new treatments to address the sharp rise in cases of multidrug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The partnership between the University of Cambridge and the National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis (NIRT) in Chennai, India, will generate a rich and lasting clinical and genomic dataset.

MRC-DBT Joint Centre for Cancer Biology & Therapeutics

Cancer is among the leading causes of disease and death worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that the number of new cases will rise by about 70% over the next two decades. This centre will link the MRC Cancer Unit at the University of Cambridge with the National Centre for Biological Sciences in India to foster research on cancer biology and therapy in India through collaborative research programmes, translational research and capacity building.

Prof K. VijayRaghavan, Secretary, Department of Biotechnology stated:

“The Department of Biotechnology, Government of India is delighted to partner with the MRC in creating research centres which will address vexing challenges in medicine through quality science and collaboration. India is committed to working with the best in the world, for India and for the world. We are acutely aware that the fruits of our partnership can mean better lives for the most- needy everywhere and are committed to make the collaboration succeed.”

Dr Mark Palmer MRC Director of International Strategy, said:

“With a 100-year history of strategic international collaboration, MRC scientists today collaborate with researchers in more than 100 countries. We know diseases don’t recognise international borders and that addressing health problems around the world demands a global response. These exciting partnerships between excellent scientists in India and the UK is a key part of our international effort to pool expertise and resources and deliver research that will make a real difference to global health.”

The Newton Fund is a new initiative which will enable the UK to use its strength in research and innovation to promote the economic development and social welfare of 15 partner countries. The Fund will help countries that are rapidly improving their own scientific capability and will help to unlock further opportunities for science and innovation collaboration.

Bradford International Film Summit

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Bradford will be playing host to the new UNESCO City of Film members at the International Film Summit.

The summit, which takes place 4-6 March 2015, will stage a series of seminars, events and screenings to discuss film and TV production and education, set against the backdrop of this film loving city.

The University of Bradford will be hosting a couple of events throughout the summit, including; a round-table discussion on March 6, 2-3pm, with a panel of new filmmakers from around Bradford, discussing how they make films in the 21st century. The panel will show examples of their work and discuss the highs and lows of making films in the here and now. This event will be of interest to budding directors, film and media students and industry professionals.

Dr Mark Goodall, Senior Lecturer at the University of Bradford’s School of Media, Design and Technology will be taking part in the round-table discussion: “It is vital that any City of Film supports and promotes young filmmakers of the region.

“This event will create a forum for debate about what is means to be an aspiring filmmaker in Bradford, and offer a showcase for some of the films being produced now in the city. Educational establishments, such as the University, train, encourage and develop the filmmakers of tomorrow but we all need to consider their future once they graduate. We must think about how can the City of Film help? What are the challenges and opportunities for filmmakers in Bradford in the 21st century?”

The event will be chaired by Kathryn Penny, producer and now film manager at the National Media Museum. The panel includes: Rad Miller – Freelance Director and founder of ‘Pocket Projects’, Jacqui Siler – Independent filmmaker and graduate of the University of Bradford’s MA Digital Filmmaking programme and Jack King – an award winning short drama and occasional music video director from Bradford. Book your free place here now.

The University will also be showing a live demonstration of its ‘Outside Broadcasting Centre of Excellence’. Using their Outside Broadcasting truck they will be live streaming City of Film delegates at http://bit.ly/1BZ9oJf and on Bradford's Big Screen.

Most events at the Bradford International Film Summit are free but attendees must pre-register in advance. Please visit www.bradfordcityoffilm.com/summit for more information and further details about all the events taking place.

DNA evidence shows surprise cultural connections between Britain and Europe 8,000 years ago

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The ancient British were not cut off from Europeans on an isolated island 8,000 years ago as previously thought, new research suggests.

Researchers found evidence for a variety of wheat at a submerged archaeological site off the south coast of England, 2,000 years before the introduction of farming in the UK.

The team argue that the introduction of farming is usually regarded as a defining historic moment for almost all human communities leading to the development of societies that underpin the modern world.

Published in the journal Science, the researchers suggest that the most plausible explanation for the wheat reaching the site is that Mesolithic Britons maintained social and trade networks spreading across Europe.

These networks might have been assisted by land bridges that connected the south east coast of Britain to the European mainland, facilitating exchanges between hunters in Britain and farmers in southern Europe.

Called Einkorn, at the time this wheat was present at the site in Southern England – located at Bouldnor Cliff – farming was only practised far away in Southern or even south eastern Europe - perhaps more than 1000 miles across Europe.

The einkorn DNA was collected from sediment that had previously formed the land surface, which was later submerged due to melting glaciers.

The work was led by Professor of the University of Bradford, Dr Robin Allaby of the University of Warwick and Professor Mark Pallen of Warwick Medical School, in collaboration with the Maritime Archaeology Trust, the University of Birmingham and the University of St. Andrews.

Professor Vince Gaffney, who is one of the University of Bradford’s new anniversary chairs, received the European Archaeology Heritage Award for his contribution to global heritage following his ground breaking work exploring the lost lands under the North Sea.

He believes that the new results not only tell us something about the introduction of farming and the making of the modern world, but confirm that the seas around our coasts preserve information about our past that is without parallel on land.

Commenting on the research’s findings Professor Vincent Gaffney, research co-lead and Chair in Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bradford, said:

“This find is the start of a new chapter in British and European history. Not only do we now realise that the introduction of farming was far more complex than previously imagined. It now seems likely that the hunter-gather societies of Britain, far from being isolated were part of extensive social networks that traded or exchanged exotic foodstuffs across much of Europe.

“The research also demonstrates that scientists and archaeologists can now analyse genetic material preserved deep within the sediments of the lost prehistoric landscapes stretching between Britain and Europe. This not only tells us more about the introduction of farming into Britain, but also about the societies that lived on the lost coastal plains for hundreds of thousands of years.

“The use of ancient DNA from sediments also opens the door to new research on the older landscapes off the British Isles and coastal shelves across the world”

Dr Allaby, Associate Professor at the University of Warwick’s School of Life Sciences, argues that the einkorn discovery indicates that Mesolithic Britain was less insular than previously understood and that inhabitants were interacting with Neolithic southern Europeans:

“8,000 years ago the people of mainland Britain were leading a hunter-gatherer existence, whilst at the same time in southern Europeans farming was gradually spreading across Europe.

“Common throughout Neolithic Southern Europe, einkorn is not found elsewhere in Britain until 2,000 years after the samples found at Bouldnor Cliff. For the einkorn to have reached this site there needs to have been contact between Mesolithic Britons and Neolithic farmers far across Europe.

“The land bridges provide a plausible facilitation of this contact. As such, far from being insular Mesolithic Britain was culturally and possibly physically connected to Europe.

“The role of these simple British hunting societies, in many senses, puts them at the beginning of the introduction of farming and, ultimately, the changes in the economy that lead to the modern world”.

The research is published in a Science paper entitled: ‘Sedimentary DNA from a submerged site reveals wheat in the British Isles 8,000 years ago’

Picture Courtesy of The Maritime Trust/Roland Brookes

Bradford exchange helps deliver higher education to rural Pakistan

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The University of Bradford has welcomed four students from rural Pakistan as part of an international exchange scheme.

The exchange, part of the International Student Exchange Programme, strengthens Bradford’s links with its associate Namal College in the Mianwali district.

The four, third year BSc Computer Science students Muhammad Usman (from Rawalpindi, Punjab)and Mazhar Abbas (from Attock Cantt, Punjab), and third year Electrical and Electronic Engineering students Bilal Ahmad (from Vahri, Punjab) and Kashif Fareed (from Battagram, KPK), will study in Bradford until the end of the second semester in May.

Namal College is now in its seventh year of operations. It is an associate college of Bradford and students graduate with University of Bradford degrees. It is the only institution in Pakistan providing such an opportunity.

The College’s Chair of the Board of Governors, Imran Khan, said: “Namal College greatly appreciates the support being provided by the University of Bradford, in its efforts to make quality higher education accessible and affordable for the youth of Pakistan.

“Namal College is rapidly moving towards its goal of becoming a centre of excellence for higher education in Pakistan, uplifting Pakistan’s rural areas through the provision of quality higher education.

“I congratulate the students on their outstanding achievement in being selected by the University of Bradford.”

Pictured (l-r) are Mazhar, Usman, Bilal and Kashif.

Digital Catapult Centre Yorkshire opens its doors to unlock value in health and social care

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The Digital Catapult, a national centre to rapidly advance the UK's best digital ideas, has opened its new centre in Yorkshire in collaboration with the Leeds City Region and York, North Yorkshire and East Riding Local Enterprise Partnerships.

The Centre will work closely with local business, academia, the public sector and the other Digital Catapult Centres across the UK with the aim of unlocking value from proprietary data - generating new jobs across the nation, driving innovation and creating millions in linked investment and funding.

The Digital Catapult Centre Yorkshire will focus on projects around overcoming the challenges with trust in the use of personalised data in health and social care. In the coming weeks, the Centre will launch a programme of events which will create opportunities for private and public sector, academia and health professionals to collaborate and unlock new value around these challenges.

Based in Bradford, the Digital Catapult Centre Yorkshire will run in partnership with two Local Enterprise Partnerships and led by the University of Bradford alongside Bradford Council, Yorkshire Universities and digital SMEs. The Centre will be an integral part of the Digital Health Enterprise Zone, creating innovations in digital health and social care and incubating and growing SMEs in digital health technologies. These initiatives release an additional £3 million of investment in the Yorkshire region.

Over the next three years, the consortia will be tasked with delivering on a range of innovative projects, designed to be accessible to start-ups and SMEs to use and learn from. As part of this, the Centre will create links between universities and business that enable cutting edge, pre-commercial R&D findings in the Digital Catapult challenge areas to be converted into commercial market opportunities which can be prototyped and piloted by start-ups and SMEs.

Neil Crockett, CEO of the Digital Catapult said: “The Digital Catapult is here to help create new opportunities across the UK and unlock innovation and value from sharing closed and proprietary data. The truth is the most exciting digital innovation is happening in local communities, like the North East and Tees Valley, who are bringing together new ideas, businesses, universities and the public sector. As a national centre, it is important we support and collaborate with these local innovation communities, it is from these local hotspots that we will find the best innovation, create the most relevant products and reap the economic benefit for the UK.”

Bradford Council Leader, Cllr David Green, said: "I am delighted that Bradford has been selected to host Digital Catapult Centre Yorkshire, one of only three regional digital catapult centres outside London. Based in the Design Exchange, it will enable small businesses to develop and showcase their innovative digital ideas and products and link up with larger businesses, which will drive the local and regional economy and forge links right across the UK."

Professor Shirley Congdon, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Bradford said: “We’re delighted that the Digital Catapult will become a key part of Yorkshire’s innovation landscape. There is much anticipation among our collaboration partners that the projects undertaken with the Digital Catapult and SME innovators, and in partnership with our Digital Health Enterprise Zone, will lead to real improvements in people's health and wellbeing as well as sustainable high technology business growth and job creation.”

Charles Lowe, Director, DHACA said: “At DHACA we recognise the importance of sharing the information and knowledge necessary to redesign health & care services digitally, so they work seamlessly across multiple platforms. This is vital to progressing the UK’s digital health economy. With this in mind, we are extremely enthusiastic about the opening of the Digital Catapult Centre in Bradford. The Centre will help to bring sharing data for wider benefit of the UK to the forefront; we are hugely passionate about supporting both the launch and the progression of the centre. There is currently a lot of innovative activity taking place in the region and we look forward to supporting its growth.”

Paul Connell, ODI Leeds, a node of ODI HQ for Leeds city region said: “We are very happy to see the innovative Digital Catapult establish a new centre in the powerhouse of Bradford. We are currently working on several exciting projects with the centre and we are confident that this collaboration will continue with future projects across the region. We see our partnership as crucial in addressing the complex challenges that exist here, in the UK as a whole and indeed globally. We will be looking forward to doing great work in one of the great Northern Cities.”

Professor Rami Qahwaji, Professor of Visual Computing at the University of Bradford said: “The Digital Catapult Centre Yorkshire provides an excellent opportunity to address significant challenges to business success by engaging in focussed research with clear outcomes. By bringing together SME innovators and academics, we can address vital issues like personal data and trust, validation and evaluation of digital health products, and developing frameworks for processing healthcare data resources, to name a few projects.”

Roger Marsh, Chair of the Leeds City Region Enterprise Partnership said: “The launch of the Digital Catapult is fantastic news for small and medium-sized businesses across the Leeds City Region. It will enable SMEs to develop new innovative ideas and products in the creative and technology sectors, and facilitate collaboration with larger business, universities and public sector organisations across the country. This strengthens the already thriving creative and digital sector within the region and has the potential to contribute significant economic growth for both Leeds City Region and the wider northern economy. “

Notes to editors

About The Digital Catapult

The Digital Catapult, which became operational in 2013, is a national centre to rapidly advance the UK’s best digital ideas. The Digital Catapult is one of seven Catapults funded by InnovateUK

The specific aim of the Digital Catapult is to drive future economic growth in the digital economy by unlocking value from proprietary data in faster, better and more trusted ways.

Unlike a number of other Innovate UK programmes, the Digital Catapult is not a funding agency. Instead, it provides support based upon available facilities, expertise and by bringing partners together to help UK SMEs innovate at speed and with less risk so that new digital products and services can be accelerated to market.

For more information about the Digital Catapult’s projects and programmes please visit the website: www.digitalcatapultcentre.org.uk

World top 10 ranking for University of Bradford MBA

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The University of Bradford's School of Management has been ranked 8th in the world for its distance learning MBA, moving up three places from last year to a global top 10 position.

The Financial Times global ranking also places Bradford first in the world for career progress for its graduates and second for value for money. On average, graduates from the school saw their salaries rise by 43 per cent three years after graduating.

The ranking comes after a year in which the School of Management was named one of Europe’s and the world’s top business schools in two other Financial Times surveys (FT European Business Schools and Masters in Management). Bradford was also ranked 14th best of all UK universities for teaching marketing (Complete University Guide), as well as moving up 65 places to 34th in The Guardian University Guide rankings.

Professor Jon Reast, Dean of the University’s School of Management, said: “We are delighted and extremely proud to see our distance learning MBA recognised as a world leader. We have more than 800 distance learning MBA students currently on our programme from over 30 countries and different cultures and industry backgrounds worldwide. That even includes a student based in the Arctic Circle!”

Key to the success of The Bradford Distance Learning MBA is both the quality of the learning experience and the flexibility of the programme. Students can take two to six years to complete their MBA. They can choose to study online or on-site, take just one subject module per quarter to ease the workload or take a break from their study if work pressures are too high.

“Our students particularly value the high level of support we provide, wherever they are located in the world”, explained Jay Muir, Director of Studies for the Distance Learning MBA. “Each student is assigned an individual tutor to guide them through each subject module and there are live online tutorials and workshops to discuss business and managerial issues with fellow students from all around the world. Studying while they work also gives them the opportunity to practically apply their learning directly back to the workplace.”

The School of Management has not only been a pioneer in launching one of the world’s first distance learning MBA’s back in 1998, it has more recently introduced the world’s first online MBA in Innovation, Enterprise and the Circular Economy. This MBA was conceived and developed with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation to take the lead in a business curriculum focused on the principles of the circular economy and sustainable development. The programme is set to receive the endorsement of the United Nations for its support of Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) and supports Bradford’s strategy to be one of the world’s most sustainable universities.

The University’s School of Management is one of only 59 business schools in the world to be awarded the elite ‘Triple Crown’ of accreditations from EQUIS (European Quality Improvement System), AMBA (the Association of MBAs) and AACSB (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business).

For further information about distance learning MBAs at the School of Management go to:
http://www.bradford.ac.uk/management/programmes/mba/distance-learning-mba/distance-learning-mba/.

University of Bradford student wins Entrepreneur Award

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A third year Optometry student at the University of Bradford has won the Duke of York young entrepreneur award.

Rabia Qureshi received her award from the Duke after launching a successful business ‘Sewing Bradford Ltd’ in November 2012.

Sewing Bradford is a specialist sewing school based in the heart of Bradford that aspires to become the No.1 Accredited Sewing School in the UK. They offer pattern making and sewing classes aimed at anyone with a love for making their own garments or furnishings. All their classes are taught by a well-experienced tutor who has been teaching dress making for over 10 years.

Rabia said: “The classes have empowered many students and have had a significant social impact. Attending classes has helped women overcome isolation and seclusion, increased self-esteem, improved mental well-being and promoted community education. These students are now able to stitch for themselves, their family and many have set up their own businesses since. We have had students come to learn from different parts of England, and interest has been shown worldwide.”

To date, the company has provided sewing classes to hundreds in basic and advanced techniques and this number is increasing month on month. The business has already created a number of jobs, employing teachers and providing apprenticeship opportunities. The course gained accreditation in 2013 which means students can gain a qualification in ‘Fashion Tailoring and Pattern Making’ on completion of the course.

Rabia and her team have also bid for and secured successful contracts with a local organisation that is aimed at helping NEET students, and they are currently planning a large tailoring hub, which would create more jobs for students and fill a large gap in the market.

Rabia, said: “As a student, managing a full time Optometry degree and a business has been an adventure, with me gaining priceless experiences. I was recently asked to judge a dragons den competition run by the Bradford council and have featured in the ‘Bradford born, bred and in business’ documentary, as well as being interviewed by the BBC news and various radio channels.

“Business has taught me how to work ethically, it has prepared me for my life as a business women and a health care professional.”

Rabia was presented with her award by the Duke at Huddersfield University on 25 March.

On winning the award, Rabia said: “Winning this award is a very special honour, I was not expecting it and I am truly gratified. The reason behind working so hard whilst studying is very dear to me and has driven me into the third year of business and now the respect of this prestigious award. Thank you for presenting me with such an honour.”

University of Bradford pre-election lecture series begins with Middle East

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The first of the University of Bradford's public lecture series in the lead up to the general election takes place on Wednesday 18th March.

The lecture, Middle East, conflict and security: foreign policy challenges of the next government, will examine the impact of foreign policy of the past two governments and assess the challenges that the next government will face.

The lecture will be delivered by Dr Afshin Shahi from the University’s peace studies division, an expert in Middle East politics, political Islam and religious sectarianism. It will take place in the Norcroft Centre on the city campus at 6pm.

The University will be hosting one of the polling stations for Bradford West in the 2015 General Elections and in the lead up to the elections will be holding various public events, including six public lectures by academics from the University. These public lectures consider some of the key election issues for the people of Bradford, the UK and the wider world, with analyses of social policy, economics, foreign policy, austerity and poverty.

The University of Bradford is celebrating British Science Week

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British Science Week takes place 13-22 March and is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths - featuring fascinating, entertaining and engaging events and activities across the UK for people of all ages.

The University of Bradford is holding a “The Light Fantastic” event on Saturday 14 March, 10-3.30pm at its STEM centre, where there will be a programme of activities for families including ‘The science of jelly and ice-cream’ and ‘Anatomage: seeing inside the human body’.

The University is also getting involved with ‘Demo Day’ on 19 March, which is part of an annual campaign to inspire secondary school teachers and technicians to explore new concepts, provoke discussions and generate excitement through running science demonstrations. By collaborating with the National Media Museum, academics from the University are delivering three days of KS2 and KS3 workshops with a twist. In the morning, KS3 pupils will be taught experiments which they will then demonstrate to KS2 pupils in the afternoon at the media museum.

Also, featuring in British Science Week is a debate on food in Yorkshire. The debate is taking place at the University on Thursday 19 March, 6.30-8pm in the Norcroft Building and will discuss whether Yorkshire could feed itself?

Participants in the debate will be Les Firbank, Professor Sustainable Agriculture, Leeds ; Geof Tansey, Professor, Food Systems Academy; Malcom Fewster, Dairy Farmer, Cleckheaton; Lindsay Smales and Hilary Wilson, Incredible Edible Todmorden and Chris Bem, Health Ecologist.

The debate will look where food comes from and how it is farmed, as well as providing an opportunity to raise the profile of good quality local food across Yorkshire.

The event is free and people can book on here.

New Director for Health and Wellbeing Centre announced

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Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bradford, Professor Brian Cantor has announced that a Director and Deputy Director have been appointed to oversee a new Health and Wellbeing Centre.

The new £7M Health and Wellbeing Centre will be built on the University of Bradford campus as part of the Digital Health Enterprise Zone. Increasingly, as the population ages, people have to live with multiple long-term conditions such as dementia, diabetes and cancer. These conditions limit people’s enjoyment of life, and they account for around 70% of NHS expenditure. The Health and Wellbeing Centre will integrate research, teaching and innovation activities focused on delaying and preventing onset of these conditions and on improving the lived experience of patients.

The centre will be used both as a community amenity - housing practising health professionals such as doctors, optometrists and dispensing pharmacists - and for tenant organisations to test out healthcare delivery innovations. Teams of researchers and students will work with patients, healthcare professionals and companies to trial and monitor new devices, services and ways of working to see which are the most effective and affordable.

Vice-Chancellor of the University, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “I am delighted to announce that, following an internal process, we have appointed Professor Allan Kellehear as Director of the Digital Health Enterprise Zone Health and Wellbeing Centre, and Dr Samar Betmouni as Deputy Director.

“The Digital Health Enterprise Zone Health and Wellbeing Centre is an exemplar of the University’s ambition to be a great technology University leading research and learning in the field of advanced healthcare. Allan and Samar will bring great experience, scholarship and energy to the development of the Centre working with colleagues across all Faculties.”

Both Allan and currently work at the University, Allan is a 50th Anniversary Chair in End of Life Care and Samar is the Director of Clinical Pathology.

The Digital Health Enterprise Zone (DHEZ) is a partnership led by the University of Bradford that will create global impact in healthcare quality. The DHEZ programme is one of four UK University Enterprise Zones funded by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills in 2014. After a successful round of bidding it received £3.8m. The programme will consist of a digital innovation centre to support small and young companies in an open innovation environment and a new Health and Wellbeing Centre housing service providers evaluating the safety and quality of healthcare delivery innovations. The DHEZ will catalyse the creation of scores of new businesses and 100s of new jobs.

Allan Kellehear

Allan Kellehear is a 50th Anniversary Professor (end of life care) at the University of Bradford and was formerly Professor of Community Health at Middlesex University, Professor of Palliative Care at La Trobe University in Australia, Professor of Sociology at the University of Bath and Professor in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

University of Bradford student wins national scholarship award for Outstanding Student Midwife

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In the presence of Her Royal Highness the Princess Royal and as part of Cavell Nurses' Trust centenary appeal, on 1 April 2015, Nada Abdul-Majid will receive an award for demonstrating the values WW1 Nurse Edith Cavell showed throughout her remarkable life.

The awards, now in its 4th year, are especially poignant as 2015 marks 100 years since the execution of Edith Cavell in German-occupied Belgium. Held at Fishmongers Hall in London, the event honours 8 winners and 8 runners up who shone through several hundred of their peers.

In a letter written to support the centenary appeal, HRH the Princess Royal said: “Cavell Nurses’ Trust do vital work each year in supporting nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants ensuring that Edith Cavell’s legacy of caring and learning lives on.”

Nada Abdul-Majid, a third year Midwifery student at the University of Bradford, has won the Cavell Nurses' Trust Scholarship Award, and is set to undertake a placement in Ghana with the scholarship prize.

This prestigious national award recognises the enthusiasm and determination of students to improve the birth experience, and sustained commitment to advancing the profession.

Nada has achieved excellent 1st class grades throughout her time at the University and excelled in practice placements. However, it is her commitment to extra-curricular activities that made her the outstanding candidate for the scholarship award.

Nada is passionate about supporting women from diverse backgrounds, and has been volunteering with the Maternity Stream of the City of Sanctuary, a Leeds based organisation working with asylum seeking and refugee women who are pregnant or have young children. Nada’s role with the City of Sanctuary is to engage with the women to improve their English and build positive relationships, interviewing the women about their personal experiences of arriving and living in the UK, and their experiences of accessing maternity care.

Her work with City of Sanctuary has inspired Nada to pursue a career as a specialist BME midwife in the future, having formed close relationships with the women she has met.

The scholarship award fund from Cavell Nurses Trust will enable Nada to undertake a three week elective placement in Ghana. She will spend two weeks in the maternity unit of a large government run hospital and a week in a village to see how maternity care is provided in a community setting. Here she will be able to gain a deeper insight into cultural childbirth practices, building on the knowledge developed through her academic and volunteer work to date. Nada hopes this will enhance her cultural competence, and the quality of care that she can provide as a midwife in the UK seeking to work with diverse ethnic groups.

Nada comments “I am absolutely thrilled that I have won the prestigious 2015 Cavell Award for ‘Outstanding Student Midwife.’ I am extremely grateful to the Cavell Nurses’ Trust for granting me the opportunity to do an elective placement abroad to develop my practice and provide the best ‘woman centred’ midwifery care to all women.”

“As a midwifery student, the highlight of my studies so far has been having the opportunity to support a variety of women and their families in what can be the most poignant time of their lives. It is a real privilege to support women throughout the childbearing continuum and empower them to make decisions about their own care. For me, there is no better feeling than forming meaningful relationships with women and their families and being there to witness new life being brought into the world!”

HRH The Princess Royal will be involved in the awards for a second year in her role as President of the Trust’s Edith Cavell centenary appeal. Prizes include funding for study abroad and laptops; previous winners have delivered health promotion in Peru and investigated mental health services for Aboriginal people in Australia.

Cavell Nurses’ Trust gives welfare support to nurses, midwives, healthcare assistants and students experiencing financial or personal hardship, often because of illness, domestic abuse, disability, working poverty and older age.

Cavell Nurses’ Trust CEO Steve Charlton says: “In the last year Cavell Nurses’ Trust helped over 1,100 people with over 7,100 years combined service to the public.

“I’d like to congratulate Nada Abdul-Majid. This year’s awards build on our commitment to be here for Nurses by celebrating excellence and leadership. These are qualities Edith Cavell demonstrated by caring for soldiers on both sides of WW1 and by helping 200 Allied soldiers reach freedom, actions which would lead to her execution by firing squad.”

The judging panel for the awards included representatives from the Welsh Government, RCN Foundation, and academic institutions, Kings College London, University of the West of England, University of Nottingham, and Oxford Brookes University.

To find out more about Cavell Nurses’ Trust, included the campaigns and events of the centenary appeal sign up at www.cavellnursestrust.org/sign-up

Bradford leaps into UK top 50 of Times Higher student survey with highest ranking rise

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The University of Bradford has achieved the highest rise in overall ranking of all UK universities in the 2015 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey results, leaping into the top 50.

The University rose from 80th place in 2014 to 45th in this year’s survey, which ranks universities by the excellence of their provision for students, as rated by the students themselves.

Nearly 14,700 students across the country contributed to the survey, which measures 21 attributes of universities, chosen by students as key indicators of the quality of their experience.

These include high-quality facilities, high quality staff/lecturers, good industry connections, good sports facilities, good community atmosphere and cheap shop/bar/amenities.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor said: “We pride ourselves on our students' experience and work hard each year to make sure that we provide an excellent environment and outstanding support, both academically and socially. What is especially pleasing is that our students are recognising the work we are doing to support them, which is reflected in the University’s significant rise in the rankings."

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Shirley Congdon, added: "I am delighted that our students value the continued improvements to their experience at the University of Bradford.

"Through strong and sustained partnership working with students we have responded to the needs of our diverse student body providing personalised approaches to learning, employability, student support and life on campus.”

University of Bradford hosts polling station and election events programme

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The University of Bradford will host one of the polling stations for the Bradford West constituency in the forthcoming General Election.

In the lead up to the election, the University will host a series of related events, including public lectures, a mini conference for schools and colleges, and a hustings, organised by the University of Bradford’s students' union, involving the constituency’s parliamentary candidates.

The series of six lectures, all hosted at the city campus, will examine some of the key political issues affecting Bradford, the UK and beyond. The lectures are:

  • Middle East, conflict and security: foreign policy challenges of the next government (Wednesday 18 March)
  • EU membership: in or out? (Wednesday 25 March)
  • Should we be giving aid? (Thursday 26 March)
  • The Impact of austerity on Bradford (Wednesday 15 April)
  • What do the social policy proposals of the three main political parties mean? (Thursday 23 April)
  • British Muslim politics (Thursday 30 April)

Professor Donna Lee will chair the hustings debate, organised by the students’ union, on Thursday 16 April.

The mini conference takes place on Wednesday 22 April and will examine questions such as is voting the best way to make a decision, should the UK stay in or leave the EU and what are the differences between the political parties?

There will also be special sessions for teachers exploring how to teach politics and deal with political issues.

Professor Donna Lee, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “We are delighted to be hosting the constituency polling station, one of the few universities in the country to be doing so. We are taking the opportunity to encourage the engagement of our students and staff as well as the local community in discussion and debate on some of the key election issues facing us all, and we are pleased to present what will be an informative and lively series of events in the run up to May.”

Sam Butterworth, sports and societies officer for the students’ union, added: “We’ve been working hard to encourage students to register to vote to make sure they have a voice and are part of the democratic process. It’s fantastic that we have got the polling station and the events will generate tremendous interest.”

Details of all the events together with how to book can be found on the Elections and Democracy website.

Bradford Pharmacy students selected for innovation leaders contest

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A team of five University of Bradford Pharmacy students have made the final cut in a national business idea competition.

The team will pitch their business idea to potential investors and senior industry professionals at the Innovation Leaders Conference in Cambridge later this month. This international two day conference, organised by the Innovation Forum on the 16-17th of April, brings together leading pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, potential investors and academics. Included is the Business Idea Competition with prize money of £10,000 to the winners.

The team’s idea, wearable technology for monitoring diabetes, was developed through the Pharmaceutical Product Innovation module run by Dr Michele Chiemeka and Dr Kevin Adams. With the recent launch of the Digital Health Enterprise Zone, led by the University of Bradford, the team are already exploring how their concept can be developed further whether they win or not in Cambridge.

MPharm 4-year team, consisting of Ali-Haider Rashid, Abdul-Rehman Javed, Wajiha Ashrafi, Vasiola Kolldani, Fikayo Ifaturoti, commented: “As a team of undergraduate students, we feel very honoured and grateful to have been invited to such an auspicious conference of business leaders to present our product. We also acknowledge the role that our families and staff at the University had in encouraging and supporting us to help us reach the stage we're at today.

"Furthermore, we are really passionate about our idea and for the advancement it offers to patients through digital health. We hope this opportunity that we have been presented with, can facilitate us to really launch our concept to the next stage of its development."

Dr , Lecturer in Bioenterprise, commented: “It’s a great idea developed by a team of really talented students. I am so impressed by their drive and commitment to turn their concept into reality.”

Dr , Module Leader and Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Sciences said: “I am very proud of the students, and impressed with the way they have taken the knowledge learnt from this module and their MPharm degree course, to come up with a brilliant idea. The student team are very passionate and enthusiastic about their wearable technology for diabetes, and I wish them all the best for the competition.”

Professor , Head of Pharmacy at the University of Bradford said: “We are proud of our students and our course, which encourages and enables students to tackle important health problems in innovative ways. I am pleased that their ideas are being recognised in this national competition.”

Victorian baby teeth could help predict future health of children today

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Baby teeth from children who died during the 1845-52 Irish famine could help us predict the future health of children born today, according to new research by the Universities of Bradford and Durham.

The team analysed the teeth of children and adults from two 19th century cemeteries, one at a Workhouse in Ireland where famine victims were buried and the other in London, which holds the graves of some of those who fled the famine. They found that the biochemical composition of teeth that were forming in the womb and during a child’s early years not only provided insight into the health of the baby’s mother, it even showed major differences between those infants who died and those who survived beyond early childhood.

Earlier work led by Dr Janet Montgomery and Dr Mandy Jay from Durham’s Department of Archaeology found similar results in people living in the Iron Age on the Isle of Skye and in Neolithic Shetland.

These archaeological findings – published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology – are now being tested in baby teeth from children born recently in Bradford and Sudan. If similar patterns can be seen in current day mothers and children, the researchers hope this could lead to a simple test on baby teeth to predict potential health problems in adulthood.

Lead researcher Dr Julia Beaumont from Bradford’s School of Archaeological Sciences explains: “We know that stress and poor diet in mothers, both during pregnancy and after birth, can have an impact on a child’s development. In the past that could mean a child didn’t survive; now it’s more likely to mean a child has a greater risk of health issues in later life. While sometimes there are obvious signs of maternal stress in the baby at birth, such as a low birth weight, that isn’t always the case. So a simple test on teeth that are naturally shed by children as they grow could provide useful information about future health risks.”

Levels of carbon and nitrogen isotopes within bone and teeth, and the relationship between the two, change with different diets, so baby teeth can reveal clues about the diet of the mother during pregnancy and the diet of the child immediately after birth. The first permanent molar also forms around birth and is retained into adulthood. Each layer of the tooth relates to around four months’ growth, starting in the womb, enabling it to be linked to a specific period of a baby’s life.

These indicators have also been thought to show when a baby has been breastfed – seen as a healthy start in life. Nitrogen isotope levels are higher in people on protein rich diets and in breastfed babies, and lower for vegetarian diets.

However, in the samples taken from the famine cemetery, the results were counterintuitive. The babies who showed higher nitrogen isotope levels at birth didn’t survive into adulthood. Those who did survive had lower and more stable nitrogen isotope levels throughout early childhood.

Similar results were found amongst Victorians buried in the London cemetery who lived during a period of high rates of infant death and amongst the prehistoric people in Scotland. Dr Beaumont believes that, far from being an indicator of a good start in life, the higher nitrogen isotope levels showed that the mothers were malnourished and under stress.

“At the period we studied, it’s likely that most babies were breastfed, but only some showed the spike in nitrogen isotope levels normally associated with it,” she says. “Where pregnant and breastfeeding mothers are malnourished however, they can recycle their own tissues in order for the baby to grow and then to produce milk to feed it. We believe this produces higher nitrogen isotope levels and is what we’re seeing in the samples from the 19th-century cemeteries. Babies born to and breastfed by malnourished mothers do not receive all the nutrients they need, and this is possibly why these babies didn’t survive.”

Dr Beaumont now hopes that the insights she’s gained from the historical graves can be used to help children in the future. She is currently testing teeth from children through the Born in Bradford project, a long term study of a cohort of 13,500 children, born between 2007 and 2010, whose health is being tracked from pregnancy through childhood and into adult life. She hopes to be able to correlate nitrogen and carbon isotope levels to the medical history of the mother and the future health of the children.

“We currently cannot analyse any other tissue in the body where the stress we are under before birth and during early childhood is recorded,” says Dr Beaumont. “If we can show that baby teeth, which are lost naturally, provide markers for stress in the first months of life, we could have an important indicator of future health risks, such as diabetes and heart disease.”

(Pictured Dr Julia Beaumont)

Bradford boosts its green credentials

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The University of Bradford is springing into 2015 with a host of achievements recognising its commitment to a sustainable and green campus.

Recent statistics have placed Bradford in the top six universities for carbon reduction.

The University has reduced its carbon footprint by 35%, saved in excess of £7m and has lower utility spend than it did a decade ago, this is in a market that has seen prices rise 85% over the same period.

Salix has awarded the University £0.9m to expand its Richmond Energy Centre to install a second generation unit to increase generating capacity to most of the buildings sited on City Campus. This along with other projects will assist the University in it’s off grid aspiration as well as further mitigate the University against an uncertain energy future where experts are predicting utility price rises and issues with supply over the coming years.

Bradford is already widely recognised for its environmental activities and the success of its climate mitigation measures it has put in place over the last decade. It has won a whole host of awards praising its sustainable build projects and development of a sustainable campus.

The University’s Estates and Facilities departments have also worked together to achieve the EcoCampus Gold accreditation.

EcoCampus is an Environmental Management System and Gold is the final stage before international management standard accreditation. This accreditation demonstrates the University’s commitment to a . Achievements include delivering sustainable construction projects and an improved natural campus, minimising pollution risks, modernising the infrastructure and improving efficiency, handling waste correctly, composting, reusing furniture and not sending waste to landfill.

The external auditor, Richard Walsh from NQA said: “Estates and Facilities, sees that sustainable development is key to moving forward successfully and to that end a new 10 year strategy for the University is being drawn up that will take things right through to the mid 2020’s.”

Clive Wilson, Director of Estates and Facilities said: “Estates and Facilities have worked as an integrated team to fully embed sustainability into everything it does.

“The University is now starting to see the effects of ten years hard work with accolades, financial savings and, reduced carbon and waste from its two campuses. Receiving the Eco Campus Gold award is a demonstration of the University’s commitment to environmental issues and the Salix grant will allow us to continue this work by further reducing its carbon footprint”.

One hundred years after the first chemical weapons attack, leaders in International Security discuss the risks they pose today.

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On 22 April 1915, the World saw the first large-scale use of chemical weapons at Ieper in Belgium during World War I.

This marked a significant change in warfare and has affected millions of people around the world and is still affecting people to this day.

To mark the anniversary the University is publishing a unique and thought-provoking public lecture given by Emeritus Professor of International Security Malcolm Dando and Dr Michael Crowley, Project Co-ordinator for Bradford Non-Lethal Weapons Research Project.

The lecture, which was filmed last month and received positive feedback, looked at whether the search for incapacitating chemical agent weapons could start a new arms race.

Professor Dando explains: "One hundred years ago, the first large-scale use of lethal chemical weapons on the Western Front took place in Belgium. Although work has been done to rid the world of the deadly stock of chemical weapons since then, do advances in neuroscience still pose a very real threat?

“This lecture discusses the risks and the potential loopholes, and the importance of advances in neuroscience being used solely for peaceful purposes as the scientists involved would surely intend.

Professor Dando uses present day examples in the lecture to demonstrate his research and the importance of acting now, “The recent use of lethal chemical weapons in Syria should remind us that chemical weapons could be a threat again, particularly as advances in neuroscience might tempt some people to believe that so-called non-lethal chemical weapons are permissible under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

“We should take the opportunity of this 100 year anniversary to redouble our efforts to ensure that this potential loophole in the Chemical Weapons Convention is closed down by states parties and advances in neuroscience are used solely for peaceful purposes.

Professor Malcolm Dando is an academic in the University of Bradford’s Peace Studies department. Bradford has the world’s largest university centre for the study of peace and conflict, with a world-class reputation for peace research.

The University of Bradford understands it plays a key role in the emergence of the knowledge economy to tackle some of the challenges of the 21st Century. Through events and lectures it aims to share knowledge and engage in conversations with the public on some of these challenges.

To view the lecture visit https://youtu.be/kIl7RcTqe8M

UK leading business woman appointed as Chancellor at University of Bradford

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One of the UK's leading business women, Kate Swann, has been appointed as the new Chancellor of the University of Bradford.

She becomes the formal head of the University in succession to the sportsman and politician, Imran Khan, who stepped down from the post in November 2014. The University's Court has formally approved Kate's appointment and she will be installed by Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor at a future date.

The Chancellor is the formal Head of the University, whose official duties are to confer degrees on graduating students, and to chair the University's Court. The Chancellor also plays a key role in the University's life as an ambassador for the institution in the UK and internationally.

Kate took up the role of CEO of the SSP group in September 2013, following ten years as CEO of WHSmith. Prior to this she was Managing Director of Argos, the UK's leading general merchandise retailer, a subsidiary of GUS plc. Kate joined Argos in December 2000 from Homebase, where she was promoted to Managing Director from Marketing Director after three years with the company.

She began her career at Tesco in 1989 as a graduate trainee and throughout her career has held a number of senior marketing roles within retail at Homepride Foods, Coca Cola and Dixons Group. She graduated from the University of Bradford with a degree in Business Management in 1986 and was awarded an honorary degree from Bradford in 2007. In 2006 she was listed in the top 50 most powerful women in business.

Commenting on the appointment, Kate Swann said, "I am thrilled to be joining the team at Bradford as Chancellor, at such an exciting stage of the university’s development. I enjoyed my time as an undergraduate enormously and look forward to supporting the university as it continues to make a real difference to its students, business and society more widely."

Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bradford, Professor Brian Cantor, said: "We are very pleased that Kate Swann is now our new Chancellor. Kate is one of the University's most successful graduates. She is an outstandingly successful businesswoman, and will be a great role model for both our students and graduates. I very much look forward to working with Kate to promote the University of Bradford as one of the world's leading technology universities."

University of Bradford hosts UK's first Play + Learn conference

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The University of Bradford is hosting the UK's first conference exploring how play and games can make learning and training more engaging.

The inaugural Play + Learn conference will take place at the University’s city centre campus from Wednesday 17th June to Friday 19th June.

The event will feature some of the world’s leading experts, including former White House senior policy analyst Constance Steinkuehler, alongside academics and senior industry figures from the BBC, Oxford University Press, games companies and the world of arts and culture.

The conference is targeted at researchers, game producers, designers and developers and those who use play to communicate, including teachers and trainers.

It will explore how play and games can aid learning and make it more memorable. For example, digital media and games can provide new worlds for exploration, discovery and interaction in a stimulating environment.

Dr Carlton Reeve, Senior Lecturer in the University’s School of Media, Design and Technology and conference chair, said: “The Play + Learn conference will explore ideas and practices that will improve the way we work and live. As well as seeing best practice from within the world of education and training, we will have important insights from leading producers, developers and artists from therapy, the media and theatre.”

Bradford courses among top in the world

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Two University of Bradford courses have again been ranked as some of the top in the world according to the latest QS World University Rankings.

The annual QS World University Rankings by Subject is a comprehensive guide to a range of popular subject areas. The rankings series reveals the top 200 universities in the world for 36 individual subjects.

The expert opinion of 85,062 academics and 41,910 employers informed the results, alongside the analysis of 17.3 million research papers and over 100 million citations. Over 3,500 universities were evaluated.

The two courses that have made it into the top 200 from the University are Pharmacy and Pharmacology, and Development Studies. This is the third time that Pharmacy at Bradford has featured in the top 200.

Bradford’s Centre for International Development welcomes students from up to 30 different countries each year, and has a knowledge transfer portfolio that has resulted in work with organisations such as the Africa Development Bank and China Development Bank.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “The University of Bradford is very proud of the high-quality of our courses. These ranking results place Bradford alongside the very best universities in the world, and I’m delighted and proud that our courses have been recognised in this way."

For more information on the rankings visit www.topuniversities.com

Bradford rises in the Complete University Guide

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The University of Bradford has leapt fifteen places in the latest Complete University Guide.

Bradford was one of just a handful to rise by more than 10 places in the Complete University Guide table for 2016. It now stands at joint 62nd out of 126 universities. Last year the university was ranked 77th, which was in turn a rise of six places from the previous year's placing of 83rd.

The rise reflects the changes and improvements that Bradford is making in partnership with students, to support them in reaching their potential.

Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bradford, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “I am pleased to see that the University of Bradford has risen 15 places in the latest Complete University Guide.

“We continue to enhance the student experience and are committed to excellence in teaching, research, and entrepreneurship. Our teaching and research addresses 21st century issues and our graduates are equipped with the knowledge and skills they need to make a difference in the world.”

The guide is based on ten measures: student satisfaction, research quality, research intensity, entry standards, student: staff ratio, spending on academic services, spending on student facilities, good honours degrees achieved, graduate prospects and completion.

Full details of the tables, including individual subjects are available here

BBC Breakfast sofa comes to University of Bradford

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BBC Breakfast brought their 'red sofa' to the University of Bradford's Faculty of Health Studies, on Friday 1 May.

The visit was part of BBC Breakfast’s ‘red sofa tour’ across the UK and this programme focused on health issues ahead of the General Election.

The sofa was in one of the University’s training hospital wards, which is part of the Faculty’s purpose-built, £10m building, enabling students to benefit from state-of-the-art facilities designed to give the closest possible ‘real-life’ practical experience.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a provider of high quality education and training, tailored to meet the needs of the healthcare workforce and service users. It has a strong research profile, focusing on themes that have a direct impact on the quality of patient care. Particular strengths include Dementia and Service Improvement and Quality. In REF 2014 (Research Excellence Framework) 92% of Faculty research was classified as 4*(World Leading) or 3* (Internationally Excellent).

Students graduate equipped with the skills they need to succeed in a wide range of healthcare and associated professions, along with the foundations for lifelong learning. The latest Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) data shows that more than 96% of graduates from the Faculty of Health Studies enter employment or further study shortly after graduating.

Other facilities include fully equipped clinical wards, simulation equipment, a fully functioning X-ray suite and a physiotherapy clinic, which is open to the public.