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News from 2016

Stay Healthly and Walk

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Walking is a great way to stay trim and helps keep your heart healthy.

It saves on petrol and bus fares, and is better for our planet. It’s easy to fit some more walking in to your working week. Whether it’s making changes to how you travel to work, or getting out more at lunchtimes or even just e-mailing less and walking over to speak to colleagues.

Find out how you can fit more walking into your daily routine with Living Streets.

Wellbeing Fair - Friday 22nd April 2016

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Join us in the Richmond Atrium between 11:00-14:30 to explore some of the wellbeing initiatives and services that are available to staff and students.

Come along and sign up to the Living Streets Campaign and pledge to walk a little more during May, all who do so at the event will receive a pedometer and water bottle (while supplies last). Find out more about Employee Benefits including My Sustain Rewards, health care cash plans, and the forthcoming Cycle To Work Scheme, and see what’s on offer from All Terrain Cycles, one of the local bike shops who are part of the scheme.

Available Shower Facilities

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Did you know that there are showers available for use by staff at the University? If you cycle into work or have a run at lunchtime or just want to freshen up during the day there are showers available for you to use across the University estate.

The following showers can be accessed via your card. If you would like to use any of these showers, log a job on Estates and Facilities ServiceNow stating which showers you would like access to and your access rights will be reviewed and updated as required:

  • City Campus, Chesham C Building - On Level 0 near Buffet Bar
  • City Campus, Horton D - Level 01, Accessible Toilet Area and near Entrance Lobby

The following showers are available to everyone as the showers have individual locks:

  • City Campus, Richmond Building - E Floor, Carlton Wing, Accessible Toilet Area
  • City Campus, Horton A - 01.03, Accessible Toilet Area
  • Emm Lane Campus, Yvette Jacobson - Room 0.18, 0.19

The following shower is key access; the key is available from the Information Desk in Student Central:

  • City Campus, Student Central - Room 01.26

The following showers are in buildings with restricted access, if you work in these buildings and would like access to the showers, log a job on Estates and Facilities ServiceNow stating which showers you would like access to and your access rights will be reviewed and updated as required:

  • City Campus, Phoenix North East - Room 0.17, 0.18, 0.19
  • City Campus, Bright Building - Room 01.01, 0.4

Sustain Wellbeing Fair

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Friday 22 April 2016, 11:00-14.30 in the Atrium, Richmond Building. Join us in the Atrium to explore some of the wellbeing initiatives and services that are available to staff and students:

Come along and find out more about Employee Benefits including My Sustain Rewards and the forthcoming Cycle To Work Scheme, and see what’s on offer from All Terrain Cycles, one of our local bike shops who are part of the scheme

Sign up to the Living Streets Campaign and pledge to walk a little more during May, all who do so at the event will receive a pedometer and water bottle (while supplies last)

Find out about our health care cash plans

Hear more about our lovely edible campus and how you can benefit from this

Meet staff from our Counselling Service and University Nursery

Bradford Beating Diabetes will also be offering mini health checks

HR staff will be available to discuss policies and procedures which support equality

Staff on the Emm Lane Campus can book a place on a Mindfulness Taster Session running on 21st April, 12:10-12:50

The Creative Space session running on the City Campus on 20th April, 15:30-16:30 is open to all staff and students

Join an Edible Campus Tour on 22 April starting at 12:30

Book a place on a short Carer’s Rights Workshop presented by Carers’ Resource to find out more about The Care Act and your rights as a Carer.

On Friday 22 April 2016 we’ll be challenging staff and students to climb the 220 steps in the central Richmond staircase, with those who complete the task being entered into a prize draw to win an Amazon voucher! With lift availability reduced during the ongoing lift refurbishment work, it’s an ideal opportunity to take the stairs more often and improve our health and fitness.

Find out more about both GENOVATE and Bradford:Leader at the relevant stands in the atrium.

Look out for further news nearer the time and revisit this page to see what’s new!

Weight Watchers meetings

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Weight Watchers meetings at the University of Bradford campus starting Tuesday 14th June 2016 in Chesham Building, room B0.33 These are initially on a 4 week contract and are subject to getting (and keeping) sufficient numbers. £15 offer for the first month, rising to £21.45 in subsequent months.

Group members are welcome to bring their lunch along to the meetings.

Already a member of Weight Watchers and attend meetings elsewhere? Did you know you can come along to meetings on campus instead if its more convenient.

Email to request a registration form or with queries.

Weight Watchers.

My Sustain Rewards

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The University has launched a new online discount hub exclusive to University of Bradford employees.

My Sustain Rewards, will enable staff members access to a range of discount vouchers and special offers on high-street shopping, restaurants, cinema, travel and your day to day shopping. There are many ways to save through the scheme whether you like to shop in-store or online covering various areas of interest; from retail, leisure and fitness to entertainment, transport and holidays.

To find out more and learn how to sign in to the discount hub please visit the My Sustain Rewards.

HELP Employee Assistance Programme

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The new HELP Employee Assistance service is designed to provide confidential professional support to University of Bradford employees and their resident dependents by promoting wellbeing and encouraging employees to seek help when faced with any personal or social problems at home or in the workplace. The HELP service provides a telephone helpline staffed by professionals, available 24 hours per day, 365 days per week and access to counselling and other support as needed.

A website with comprehensive information and advice on dealing with personal and social issues is also available 24 hours per day.

To obtain support from HELP Employee Assistance please phone: 0800 019 3485

or visit our website at www.your.helpeap.com

EAP Info Card Part One

EAP Info Card Part 2

Interested in joining a Carers Support Group?

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If you are a University employee who also cares for someone who is frail, ill or disabled might you be interested in joining the University's Carers Support Group?

This group meets once each month on the city campus. Our objectives are;

  • to create a group which supports carers in their caring role
  • to help them to look after their own health and wellbeing
  • to allow them time away from both their work and caring roles to be themselves

Our meetings each month are built around activities to meet one of the three key aspects.

For further information about the group or to express an interest in joining please email sustain@bradford.ac.uk.

Bradford academic advises on Under the Bed Play

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University of Bradford Social Work lecturer Philip Gilligan has provided professional academic advice to the creators of the play Under the Bed which is currently touring England. The play, from 154 Collective, addresses issues around child abuse using metaphor.

Dan Mallaghan, writer and theatre practitioner at 154 Collective contacted Philip early on in the writing, explaining that he wanted to explore issues about a child coping with child sexual abuse and its aftermath – principally through the use of fairy tales. Having met with Dan, Philip agreed to assume the key role to advise, not only on issues relating to the child’s response, such as the the need to look at the ambiguous feelings that a child may feel towards the abuser, but also the likely response from statutory agencies.

Much of the plot develops offstage and there is no direct or explicit mention of child abuse – the girl playing the central role of Alice understood that in the play her parents had fallen out and had been taken away from her. The story throws Alice into a series of adventures under her bed with monsters, much of which took place on video screen.

Philip’s input into the play as role of consultant helped the creators to link through the complexities and realities for both the child’s experience and also the role of social care. This ensured that the responses of those within the play were credible and took into account the likely actions of social care professions as a result of regulatory frameworks such as their need to know a child is safe and the notion of what is know as the threshold test. He also provided input into the discussion of how children that are experiencing trauma can use fantasy, and that in the event of Alice being provided with therapy, it could involve the use of stories.

Phillip said: “Children don’t necessarily have the words or desire to talk through what they’ve experienced, but they can work through it in a symbolic way – so the play is about remembering the reality, overcoming the reality and slaying her demons.”

Dr Phillip Gilligan is part of the team in the Division of Social Work at the University of Bradford and is a prolific publisher of his research. Central to his publications is his research into child abuse and child exploitation and children’s responses to it. Philip is a regular contributor to teaching within the Division, on the Social Work with Children with Families module of the BA and MA in Social Work degrees. Philip also specialises in research into minority communities, particularly in the context of religion and belief.

Head of the Division of Social Work Collette McAulay said: “The University of Bradford has been training social workers since 1970s and currently has over 500 students within its department. One of its distinctive features is that it engages with research which is applied directly to improving policy and practice within the sector. Research includes international collaboration with 26 other countries into children’s own perspectives on their wellbeing, LGBT health inequalities in an international perspective, and the impact of poverty on child welfare and wellbeing.”

Philip was one of the key contributors in the recent Research Excellence Framework Submission, which assesses the quality of research in Higher Education Institutions. Bradford’s Social Work submission was ranked in the top 10 of all higher education institutions nationwide.

Under the Bed was co-commissioned by ARC Stockton and Theatre in the Mill

When Alice is stolen away in the middle of the night by her mum she has no idea what is happening. Scared, confused and angry, Alice finds herself in a strange house, forbidden to leave, arguing with her mum during the day and hiding under her covers from the strange noises at night.

Told using performance, music, live animation and film, Under the Bed is a compelling new play about childhood trauma and what happens when nightmares are indistinguishable from reality.

University of Bradford Students Volunteer to be Guardians of Public Safety

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For the next ten weeks, students from the University of Bradford will work alongside experienced officers from West Yorkshire Police and West Yorkshire Fire & Rescue Services to assist with public safety and crime prevention initiatives in the city of Bradford.

This week marks another fantastic annual celebration of over 21 million people who volunteer in the UK. As part of a new partnership with West Yorkshire Police, University of Bradford students studying for a degree in Applied Criminal Justice Studies and Psychology and Crime in the Faculty of Social Sciences will be making a positive contribution to the city through the West Yorkshire Police Student Guardianship Scheme.

For up to 4 hours each week, eight students will support an experienced officer in a range of duties, including providing visible patrols in areas with higher levels of burglary, engaging with the community and working with the Fire & Rescue Service to reduce nuisance fires. They will engage with members of the community to offer crime prevention advice and support for which they will receive training from the police.

Dr Barker, Lecturer in Crime and Deviance from the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “We are delighted that our criminology students will have an opportunity to make a positive contribution to the city by supporting the police and fire services in a range of initiatives as well as gaining important practical skills and experience of everyday policing and community safety issues that underpin their degree programmes at Bradford”.

Annaliese Emmerson, Project Co-coordinator for West Yorkshire Police, commented: “Through this scheme, students will gain vital employability skills, enhance their communication skills as well as gain an invaluable insight into working with the Police and other partnership agencies”.

The University of Bradford offers a range of programmes in the discipline of sociology and criminology, including Applied Criminal Justice Studies, Sociology, Sociology and Psychology and Psychology and Crime. Specialist research areas include Identities, Diversities and Criminal Justice; Ethnic Diversity and Community Cohesion; Family Change, Behaviour and Policy; and Identity and the Self.

For more information please contact Dr Anna Barker

Former sociology student establishes Hope Housing

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Former Sociology Student in the Faculty of Social Sciences Helen Syrop made Bradford her home after studying at the University and established Hope Housing, a homelessness charity that offers accommodation, training, and support to those who find themselves at risk of sleeping rough in the city.

This film is part of the ‘50 Years 50 Stories’ series celebrating the University of Bradford’s 50th Anniversary in 2016. These films were created by the University’s current students and recent graduates through the Digital Media Working Academy.

Lecture: EU, sustainable societies and social equality (watch the recording)

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What has the EU ever done for us? This lecture considers the social and political aspects of Brexit with specific reference to social policy agendas, such as employment rights and gender equality.

This lecture is part of a series of lectures and webinars which look beyond the headlines and examine some of the key political issues affecting Bradford, the UK and beyond.

Jane Booth is Curriculum Development Associate in the Faculty of Social Sciences and specialises in the research areas of co-production, community empowerment and sustainable societies.

22nd Bradford Development Lecture

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Professor David Hulme: Global Governance and Sustainable Development Goals: All Change... No Change? On 1st January 2016 the world moved from implementing the poverty reducing Millennium Development Goals to pursuing the poverty eradicating, prosperity promoting and sustainability enhancing Sustainable Development Goals.

The UN has frames the new goals as ‘transformational’ but is this correct… or, are the SDGs merely another smaller scale, episodic advance?

In this lecture Professor Hulme assesses the evidence and analyses the processes underpinning the MDGs to SDGs shift.

David Hulme is Professor of Development Studies at The University of Manchester where he is Executive Director of the Global Development Institute and CEO of the Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre. Currently, He is the president of the Development Studies Association.

Professor Hulme was born in Ormskirk, Liverpool, and moved at the age of 19 to the University of Cambridge from which he graduated with honours as BA in Economic geography in 1974. In 1984 the received his PhD in Land Settlement Schemes and Rural Development at the James Cook University in Queensland, Australia.

Among other appointments, Professor Hulme is currently an academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a member of the Scientific Committee of the Comparative Research on Poverty Programme of the International Social Science Council(ISSC) and a board member of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD).He has been a leading international expert in the discussion of the Millennium Development Goals and the Post-2015 Development Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals.

Peace studies student to represent Bradford on University Challenge

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Peace Studies student Oliver Denton, currently studying an MA in International Politics and Security Studies, is to represent Bradford as part of the University Challenge team.

The last time that Bradford won University Challenge was in 1979 when a team of students from the University of Bradford triumphed against Lancaster University in the final of University Challenge, 215 points to 160. The 1979 team boasted three postgraduate computer science students (John Watt, Mike Bradford, John Simkin). The other team members were Maxwell Cooter, an Interdisciplinary Human Studies student, and a reserve, Martin Lee, a postgraduate in Social Sciences.

University Challenge is a British quiz programme that premiered in 1962, hosted for 25 years by Bamber Gascoigne and currently hosted by Jeremy Paxman. The programme features two teams of four representing their university in a tournament style competition where students answer questions on a diverse range of subjects in a number of different categories.

Oliver, who is in the last semester of his course said: "By coming to the University and being a student in the Department I have achieved my greatest dream. But now I have been selected to be part of the University Challenge team. I am proud to represent a fine academic institution like Bradford and represent the Peace Studies Department, which is a great honour.

“All of the team are from a diverse and fantastic range of backgrounds, we have recently been through a meeting at ITV studios and we are now eagerly awaiting news. I understand I am the only Peace Studies student to ever go through the selection process and once it hopefully gets to the televised stages I will be the only Peace Studies Department student to ever appear on the show. Bradford last won University Challenge in 1979 and by winning in 2016 this will not only be fantastic for the University, wonderful for the Peace Studies Department but also a tremendous achievement for the city of Bradford."

The University of Bradford’s Division of Peace Studies is oldest and largest department of its kind, having celebrated its 40th anniversary last year and featuring alumni such as Saeb Erekat, Palestine’s chief negotiator.

Preventing Biological Threats: What You Can Do

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The University of Bradford has developed two authoritative books on biological security education. The books, which are aimed at lecturers and undergraduates studying life science courses, are freely available as educational tools designed to assist students, faculty members, researchers and professionals in developing a better understanding of biological security issues in the twenty-first century and how they can be addressed.

The project is has been jointly funded by the Governments of Canada and the UK under the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction.

The new books produced by disarmament experts at Bradford and from around the world are designed to help scientists understand how their important, benignly-intended work may be misused by others in a hostile way, and give them guidance on how they can prevent this.

The first book titled ‘Preventing Biological Threats: What you can do’ provides an overview of the potential biological threats from States and sub-State groups and what States, organisations, scientists, and the international community as a whole are doing, and can do, to deal with such threats. The second book, ‘Biological Security Education Handbook: The Power of Team-Based Learning’ seeks to facilitate the dissemination of training content by offering guidance on how to design Team-Based Learning seminars and training courses, in order to involve groups of scientists at all levels in discussion of these issues and what can be done to prevent the potential threats.

Among the key contributors to the Project are the US National Academy of Sciences, Royal Scientific Society – Jordan, International Federation of Biosafety Associations, Centre for Biosecurity and Preparedness – Denmark, Public Health Agency of Canada, US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Jordanian Armed Forces, Royal Medical Society – Jordan, Ministry of Health – Jordan, and INTERPOL. The list of contributors further features prominent disarmament experts, practitioners, and academics.

The books are freely available online on the . The respective Appendices contain relevant additional guiding material and resources. An Arabic version of the Guide to Biological Security Issues and How to Address Them will be made available soon. Versions in other languages are under development.

Fragile States workshop for Rotary Peace Fellows

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The 'Designing Programmes and Ensuring Conflict Sensitivity in Fragile and Conflict Affected Contexts' workshop for Peace Studies students led by Professor Owen Greene, saw MA students craft their own project log frame and conflict sensitivity analysis for a fragile state.

Whilst a 7-hour workshop with significant pre-reading was challenging, Professor Greene kept the students engaged and excited as they saw their learning being put to use with challenging case studies. Student feedback from the day has been strongly positive and we now have a far greater understanding of and confidence in using log frames and conflict sensitivity analysis.

The Bradford Rotary Peace Fellows would like to thank Prof Owen Greene for the significant amount of time he put into this workshop.

Content from 'Fragile States' workshop for Rotary Peace Fellows

The 'Designing Programmes and Ensuring Conflict Sensitivity in Fragile and Conflict Affected Contexts' workshop for Peace Studies students led by Professor Owen Greene, saw MA students craft their own project log frame and conflict sensitivity analysis for a fragile state.

Father Francisco 'Pacho' de Roux seminar

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Father Francisco 'Pacho' de Roux gave an inspirational lecture to Peace Studies staff and students on how it is possible to retain a commitment to peace against all the odds.

Father Francisco 'Pacho' de Roux is a Colombian Jesuit, intellectual and peace builder. He has an MA in economics from the LSE and a Phd from the Sorbonne. He has played a major role in the efforts to build peace in Colombia. He has assisted in peace negotiations (e.g. with the M19 guerrillas in the late 1980s), but arguably more importantly, in the midst of the Colombian civil war, he has tired to build peace and development in a region of multiple armed actors, the Magdalena Medio. No-one thought it was possible to consider development for the poorest in such a context. Pacho has consistently defied the 'possible'. He gave an inspirational lecture to Peace Studies staff and students on how it is possible to retain a committment to peace against all the odds. Today, he is playing a significant role in supporting the victims of the country's long civil war to articulate their experience to the actors negotiating a peace accord in Havana. More than this, Pacho offers an ethical and spiritual reflection on the challenges of peace and peace building for a country that has known extreme violence and which faces the challenges of turning a Peace Accord into a Sustainable Peace.

Father Francisco de Roux with Peace Studies staff

Father Francisco de Roux with Peace Studies staff (Neil Cooper, Jenny Pearce, Donna Pankhurst, Fiona Macaulay) and Clare Dixon from the Catholic Fund for Overseas Development (CAFOD) who are organising Father de Roux's lecture tour.

International Development at Bradford ranked in top 100 of courses worldwide

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The International Development programme at the University of Bradford has been ranked as one of the top in the world according to the latest QS World University Rankings.

Bradford’s Centre for International Development welcomes students from up to 30 different countries each year, and has a knowledge transfer portfolio that has resulted in work with organisations such as the Africa Development Bank and China Development Bank.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor, said: “The University of Bradford is very proud of the high-quality of our courses. These ranking results place Bradford alongside the very best universities in the world, and I’m delighted and proud that our courses have been recognised in this way."

The QS World University Rankings by Subject are compiled using indicators selected to assess institutions’ international reputation in each subject area, alongside research impact in the field. Reputation is assessed using QS’s major global surveys of academics and employers, while research impact is gauged using citations data from Elsevier’s Scopus® bibliometric database.

Published since 2011, the rankings highlight the world’s top-performing institutions in a broad spectrum of individual academic areas. The rankings aim to help prospective students identify leading universities in their chosen field of study.

The full rankings for International Development can be seen by clicking here.

Responsible Tourism Workshop, Myanmar

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Bradford academic Dr Julia Jeyacheya was hosted by the Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business at a Multi-Stakeholder Workshop in Ngapali, Rakhine State (11-13 May 2016). She delivered a presentation on coastal tourism in South East Asia, co-written with Dr Mark Hampton, University of Kent. In addition, a report based on field research completed by Drs Jeyacheya and Hampton in Ngapali, November 2014, was included in all delegate packs and available in English and Myanmar.

The workshop was addressed by U Min Aung, Minister of Development Affairs for Rakhine State who identified the ‘participation of local communities as the only way to develop responsible tourism in Ngapali’. 100 or so participants including mainly local stakeholders, and international beach tourism experts attended the workshop at Thande Beach Resort over the three days.

Julia commented on the workshop as a "truly open and democratic forum for the local people and businesses to voice their opinions about the future of tourism development in Ngapali".

Vicky Bowman, Director of Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business describes the workshop as “the first opportunity for different stakeholders to come together to discuss the direction they want to see tourism take in Ngapali. All voices need to be heard as the new government seeks to develop Ngapali as a world- class tourism destination. An inclusive process for destination management planning is vital”.

For more details of this workshop and its outcomes, visit the Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business (MCRB) click here.

50 Years 50 Stories: Emma Jones

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After studying Peace Studies at the University of Bradford, Emma Jones has gone onto work in Uganda for the international development organisation Advocate Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE). In this interview Emma shares her life changing experiences of being in Rwanda, her journey as a student and her aspirations for the future.

This film is part of the ‘50 Years 50 Stories’ series celebrating the University of Bradford’s 50th Anniversary in 2016. These films were created by the University’s current students and recent graduates through the Digital Media Working Academy.

www.bradford.ac.uk/50

'The war against ISIS is the kind of war that will become dominant', new report finds

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A new report from a leading international security specialist argues that the wars against al-Qaida and ISIS are examples of the kinds of conflicts that will come to dominate international affairs. These will lead to a deeply unstable and violent world in the coming decades unless there are fundamental changes in the world-wide approaches to marginalisation and climate change.

According to Irregular War: ISIS and the New Threats from the Margins, written by Professor Paul Rogers and published today, ISIS, al Qaida, Boko Haram, Al Shabab and the Taliban are all examples of a new non-state dynamic which is now driving international conflict through asymmetric and hybrid warfare, but their real significance is much more fundamental.

The problem for the future is not a clash of civilisations but a rapidly increasing risk of revolts from the margins. ISIS, in particular, is a proto-movement for the wars that will become dominant in an increasingly divided and constrained world.

According to Irregular War, the result of a two-year study, the underlying drivers of future conflict are far more than the growth of extreme Islamist movements. They stem from a deeply flawed world economic system that is producing greater inequalities and mass marginalisation, resentment and bitterness, combined with the onset of persistent global environmental limits, especially climate disruption which will lead to the migration of millions of people looking for a safe and secure life.

The extreme movements of the future could as easily be rooted in ethnic or nationalist outlooks or political ideologies such as neo-Maoism. The idea that radical Islamist movements are the only problem is fundamentally misleading and disguises the extent of the problem facing us.

Moreover, the failed war on terror, now heading towards its 16th year, shows that the consequences of these drivers of conflict cannot be controlled by military force and the wealthy of the world cannot “close the castle gates”.

After all, even the intense two-year air war against ISIS, which has killed 30,000 of its followers, has not brought it under control – attacks from Baghdad to Brussels and Paris to Istanbul demonstrate that to devastating effect.

What is required is a fundamentally new approach to security if we are to avoid a highly unstable and violent world - an age of insurgencies which might even involve weapons of mass destruction. We need radically to change our understanding of security, a change that is possible but requires vision and commitment.

The report has already gained some strong endorsements.

The former Home Secretary, Charles Clarke, who was in overall charge of UK national security at the time of the 7/7 attacks, has said that the report is:

“Outstanding… Irregular War presents the need to establish a completely different approach to our world economic system, to the challenge of climate change and to conventional ideas of military control. The book is an essential contribution to thinking about the best way to confront the challenges of an unstable world”

The former Director of the Royal United Services Institute for Defence Studies, Professor Michael Clarke, describes it as: "a masterly summary of a debate that we are emphatically not having, but which we certainly should.”

The author, , is Professor of Peace Studies at Bradford University and Global Security Consultant to the Oxford Research Group. He has lectured for over thirty years at Britain’s senior defence colleges and has also briefed senior official at the Home Office, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, MI5, the Ministry of Defence and the Cabinet Office. He has written or edited 26 books and is a frequent broadcaster on the national and international media.

Irregular War; ISIS and the New Threat from the Margins will be published by I B Tauris on 14 July 2016.

Trophy was presented to Academic Rashmi Arora

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This trophy was presented to Academic Rashmi Arora as a thank you gift by the students of MSc in Economics and Finance for Development Programme on September 7, 2016.

Photo left to right: Sandra Hernandez, Abdirahman Said, Rashmi Arora and Jacquel

Photo left to right: Sandra Hernandez, Abdirahman Said, Rashmi Arora and Jacqueline Kaija

Social Sciences graduate Dr Toby Feakin appointed as Australia's inaugural Ambassador for Cyber Affairs

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Social Science graduate Dr Toby Feakin (BSc Security Studies 1998 and a PhD in International Politics and Security Studies 2005), has been appointed as Australia's inaugural Ambassador for Cyber Affairs.

The Ambassador will support cyber capacity building in our region, advocate against state censorship of the Internet and promote Australia’s view that opportunities provided by the Internet should be available to all people.

Dr Feakin was a member of the Independent Panel of Experts that supported the Australian Cyber Security Review to produce Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy. He has been the Director of National Security Programs at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute since 2012 and established the Institute’s International Cyber Policy Centre.

He has also held a number of research and advisory positions, including with the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies, the Oxford University Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, the Global Commission on Internet Governance and the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace.

Dr Feakin holds an Honours Degree in Security Studies and a Doctorate of Philosophy in International Politics and Security Studies, both from the University of Bradford. He is expected to take up the appointment in January 2017.

See more information and a video of two of Australia's MPs discussing his appointment.

Webinar: Brexit? Foreign and Security Policy Implications (watch the recording)

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This Webinar examines the security issues raised by the possibility that the UK will leave the EU. This lecture is part of a series of lectures and webinars which look beyond the headlines and examine some of the key political issues affecting Bradford, the UK and beyond.

Watch the recording

You can watch a full recording of the webinar, including video and the full Q&A session at the end by clicking the link above, downloading and running the Blackboard Collaborate helper tool, and following the instructions.

Prof Owen Green is a lecturer in the division of Peace Studies, Chair of the Management Board and specialises in non-proliferation and disarmament (especially conventional and nuclear arms)- regional security (especially Europe, East Asia and West Africa; Military transparency, confidence building measures and the UN Arms Register; Multilateral and EU Arms Export controls; conflict prevention (including intrastate CBMs and light weapons issues; International environmental regimes: development, implementation and effectiveness; Responding to climate change, ozone depletion and sea pollution; Main Geographic Area: Europe; East Asia, CIS, also aspects of West Africa and South Asia

MBA Alumna, Dana Skelley, awarded an OBE

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Congratulations to MBA Alumna, Dana Skelley, who has been recognised with an OBE in the Queen's New Year's Honours.

Dana is one of the most senior and widely-respected women in engineering in Britain and is Transport for London's (TfL's) Director of Asset Management for Surface Transport.

Read more on Transport for London's website

Former Newsnight anchor Jeremy Paxman cites research by School of Management academic in speech

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Economic research by a University of Bradford School of Management professor on the impact of litter has been quoted in a speech by Jeremy Paxman.

Speaking at the Foodservice Packaging Association annual Environment Sector seminar in Solihull, Mr Paxman cited research by Bradford School of Management Professor of Marketing, Stuart Roper, which found that litter is not only visually and environmentally detrimental, but also has a negative effect on companies’ profits.

The research showed that corporate logos on packaging that has been dumped on the ground ends up hitting the bottom lines of those companies by up to two per cent (2%)*.

Former Newsnight anchor Mr Paxman was speaking in his capacity as Patron of the litter campaigning organisation, Clean Up Britain (CLUB).

Find out more about Mr Paxman's speech at the FPA Environment Sector seminar.

Find out more about Clean Up Britain.

* Source: Roper, S., & Parker, C. (2013). Doing well by doing good: A quantitative investigation of the litter effect. Journal of Business Research, 66(11), 2262–2268.

Bradford School of Management MBA student finalist in prestigious awards

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A University of Bradford School of Management student is celebrating making the finals of a prestigious academic competition.

James Peacock, who is in his final year of the Executive MBA at the Bradford Management School, achieved a place in the finals of the Association of MBAs (AMBA) Student of the Year Award for his work on water sustainability.

His work focuses on reducing the environmental and social impact of the water industry.

It is the first time the Bradford School of Management has had a finalist in the AMBA Student of the Year.

James, who works for Wessex Water, said: "Water scarcity and quality is a world-wide problem, and one that will get worse with climate change. Business has a big role to play in overcoming the future challenges, and I think business schools can help drive the change of approach required.

"My project of creating the first zero landfill utility in the UK at Wessex Water has attracted attention in the trade press and at events. I am now leading on further sustainability projects which have the potential to change the industry, further enhancing my reputation and potential for career progression.

"My ultimate goal is to change how the world thinks about water, and I plan on achieving a career that will support this. Since starting the MBA I have been promoted by my current employers, and entered in to the company’s fast-track management programme.

"None of this would have been possible without the MBA, which has given me the credibility and knowledge to demonstrate the business benefits of sustainability.

"I am a strong advocate of the MBA, as it has enhanced my skills, knowledge and reputation at work."

He added: "I feel the modern MBA is about so much more than the bottom line, and I hope to take my learning and demonstrate this and to help the industry deal with the challenges of the future."

MBA Director of Studies, Dr Craig Johnson said: “Congratulations are due to James. It is all the more of an achievement as entries were 50 per cent up on last year.

“The competition at this level is extremely high. It was fantastic to see Bradford being represented at such a high level of the MBA community. Well done James!”

The finals were part of the AMBA Gala Dinner which took place at The Langham Hotel, London. The speaker for the evening was Michael Portillo.

The overall winner of the award was Maria Cecilia Rodriguez Alcalá from IE Business School in Madrid who had raised $1bn for Paraguay’s first educational trust fund for education, technology and social inclusion.

Find out more about studying for an MBA at the University of Bradford School of Management.

Find out more about AMBA, the awarding body AMBA.

Leeds Bradford International Airport visit gives insight into aviation industry

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MBA students have been getting first-hand experience of the aviation industry on a visit to Leeds Bradford International Airport.

As part of the Strategic Management module of the course students visited the Southside Aviation Centre at the airport.

The aim was to identify different sectors within the aviation industry, examine how aviation business Multiflight operates and analyse the current position of the industry.

Director of Studies for MBA at Bradford School of Management, Dr Craig Johnson said: “The trip to Leeds Bradford Airport provided a real insight into one of the major employers in the region. As well as providing insight into another industry, it allowed the MBA students to think about the underlying principles of industry structure that forms a basis for their module on Strategic Management."

Visit organiser Paula Reynier, who is studying the MBA course at the School of Management, works at the Aviation Academy at Leeds Bradford Airport and has a keen interest in the development of UK aviation.

She said “The visit started with a tour of the Multiflight hangars. The first hangar is located closest to the runway and stores privately owned aircraft, Multiflight light aircraft, two jet aircraft and helicopters.

“There are also two hangars used for maintenance. Along with Multiflight light aircraft, two commercial aircraft were in the hangar for checks, B737 and B757.

“We also visited The Aviation Academy, a college with further education and higher education provision which is located in Hangar 1.

“Derek Brickell, lecturer in Aviation Management and Air Transport Planning, presented information about the UK Aviation Industry. He also discussed his previous role in marketing at East Midlands Airport.”

Paula joined the Aviation Academy in 2010, teaching across a range of courses from BTEC Aviation Operations courses to BSc degrees as well as providing learner support to students on full time courses.

After completing her BA (Hons) Geography, Paula worked as for Virgin Atlantic Airways. In 2001, she left Virgin for a career in financial services for Chase de Vere Investments, before becoming a teacher at the Aviation Academy.

Find out more about The Aviation Academy.

Find out more about Multiflight.

School of Management hosting ESRC seminar on women professionals and leaders in the media

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The University of Bradford School of Management is hosting the fifth seminar in the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar Series on Wednesday, March 16.

The theme of the seminar is 'Challenging Gendered Media Mis(s)Representations of Women Professionals & Leaders'.

Coordinated by Bradford School of Management Human Resource Management lecturer Dr Jannine Williams, it is the fifth seminar in the series will focus on theories and methodologies for challenging gendered media representations.

It will explore visual methods and approaches to analysing social media which can inform Management and Business Studies scholars interested in interrogating gendered media representations and contribute to Management and Business curricula, research and practice.

Dr Williams said: "The media is a powerful player in the promotion or otherwise of gender equality worldwide and media representations of women have great impact on how women are viewed and view themselves.

"However, a continued media focus on women's gender, not competence, ignores women's achievements as leaders and professionals, misrepresenting their ability, contribution and advancement. This innovative seminar series explores, examines and challenges how media shapes and influences the way in which women are represented as professionals and leaders."

The theme of the ESRC Seminar Series is Multi-disciplinary Approaches: Analysing Media Text and Visual Methods.

This seminar series is a collaborative project with Lancaster University, Northumbria University and Bradford University, and is running between October 2014 to June 2017.

Dr Williams added: "Unique in bringing together leading international researchers, journalists, lobbyists and those committed to the progress of women professionals and leaders, this series aims to raise awareness and understanding of gendered stereotypes of women and their effects; challenge the gendered construction of women leaders in the media; identify future research agendas for academics and practitioners in management and business."

The seminar will examine multidisciplinary approaches to the analysis of media text and visual methods.

The speakers on March 16 at Bradford will include:

Professor Loubna Skalli Hanna

Professor at California University's Washington Center, DC, USA. Loubna is an international scholar and consultant with area expertise in gender, youth, media and the politics of development in the Middle East and North Africa. She has an extensive record of publications that include books, referred journal articles and chapters in edited books and encyclopedias.

Dr Sarah Robinson

Dr Sarah Robinson is Reader Organisation Studies at the Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow. Sarah’s interests include developing visual methodologies for the study of websites and multi-modal representations of organisations. She is also interested in historical and hermeneutic approaches to leadership and management studies. She is currently researching media representations of Scottish political women over a 25 year timeframe.

Professor Janne Tienari

Janne Tienari is Professor of Organization and Management at Aalto University School of Business, Helsinki, Finland. Tienari’s research and teaching interests include gender studies, strategy work, managing multinational corporations, mergers and acquisitions, branding and media, and changing academia. His latest passion is to understand management, new generations, and the future. His work has been published in leading organization and management studies journals.

Dr Pasi Ahonen

Pasi Ahonen is a Lecturer in Management at Essex Business School, University of Essex, UK. Pasi’s research interests include rethinking diversity and difference in organizations; temporality, history and memory in organizational settings, and organizations and work in the media. His work has been published in leading management and organization journals as well as edited collections

To reserve a place email Professor Carole Elliott at: carole.elliott@roehampton.ac.uk

Find out more about the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

Circular Economy MBA student wins sustainability award for company

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An MBA student at the University of Bradford School of Management has helped his company win an industry award.

Tom Harper, who is on the Bradford Innovation, Enterprise and the Circular Economy MBA, led Unusual Industries Ltd to scoop Highly Commended status in the Enterprise category of The Circulars 2016.

The award recognised Tom’s work over the last two years in implementing a circular economic model within the business, which offers solutions to the challenges of suspending, elevating or moving equipment, scenery or people.

An initiative of the World Economic Forum of Young Global Leaders, the judging panel is made up of Danish MP Ida Auken, director of economics at the CBI Rain Newton-Smith and managing director, Global Accenture Strategy – Sustainability Services Peter Lacy.

Commenting on Tom's work, the panel said: “The judging panel were extremely impressed by the entry, in particular the details around how you are helping embed new industries within the closed loop arena.”

Tom, pictured right, said: “This award demonstrates the value of the Bradford School of Management Circular Economy MBA - something which has been of benefit to my company!”

He added: “We have focused on implementing key circularity loops within our business. Through re-manufacturing and applying RFID technology we have extended the value of all our equipment, ensuring it loops for longer, capturing greater embodied energy as well as using ICT software to enable better tracking and servicing of all equipment.

“We have a made to be made again product base for component parts on all theatre/museum installations, cascading resources for refurbishment or recycling. We design for disassembly with reuse of all passable component parts within our ecoline products base, therefore building further capacity at the end of life stage.”

As well as renewing their manufactured goods, Unusual Ltd also has a strong focus on using renewable energy.

“We are now 55 per cent energised on site by solar PV, therefore ensuring our commitment to designing a value system which generates and uses renewable energy,” said Tom.

“We stream all resources effectively ensuring zero waste to landfill with our resource management partner Veolia.

“We ensure all unused metal is cascaded into other uses, via re-manufacturing and product takeback methods. We have a robust toxicity analysis being implemented at the procurement stage with our key suppliers, ensuring cleaner materials that can be circulated for longer within a technical environment.”

Unusual Industries are key co-creators and collaborators with the Sustainability in Production Alliance.

Bradford School of Management professor scoops lasting impact award for work

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A leading academic in the field of Organisation Studies has won the 2016 Lasting Impact Award from the Teaching Society for Management Educators (OBTS) and Sage Publishing.

Prof Ann Cunliffe, who is professor of Organisation Studies at the University of Bradford School of Management, received the award for her article, ‘On becoming a critically reflective practitioner’, published in the Journal of Management Education, Volume 28 Issue 4 (2004).

The Lasting Impact Award recognizes an article published in JME at least 10 years prior that continues to have a significant impact on management education or educators, either conceptually or practically, since its publication.

Commenting on Prof Cunliffe's work, the awarding panel said: “Ann Cunliffe’s paper has had a broad and deep impact on teaching. It’s often used as the basis for learning and reflection activities in leadership courses at postgrad, MBA and advanced undergraduate levels.

“A search of Google Scholar shows 371 citations for the article, 72 of which are from 2015 and 2016, and it has been cited in a broad range of outlets and several books. Clearly, this is a contribution that continues to influence teaching and learning scholarship and practice.”

Prof Cunliffe said she was honoured to receive the award. “This is a wonderful and much appreciated honour,” she said. “I'm pleased that the paper is still relevant and being used by colleagues teaching both undergraduates and graduates.”

Prof Carole Howorth, who becomes Interim Dean of the School of Management on March 1, said: “It’s great to see the good work that is being undertaken around the Faculty. Don’t forget to celebrate your successes!”

In their discussion of the nominated articles, comments from the JME Associate Editors included: “Ann Cunliffe’s paper has had a broad and deep impact on teaching. It’s often used as the basis for learning and reflection activities in leadership courses at postgrad, MBA and advanced undergraduate levels.”

The award will be presented at the 44th annual OBTC Teaching Conference in June at Walsh University, Canton, Ohio.

The OBTS Teaching Society for Management Educators is the oldest international professional organisation dedicated to teaching and learning excellence in the organisational and management sciences.

Prof Cunliffe’s work is available to read for free here.

Ethics in business on the agenda at Principles for Responsible Management Education event

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A networking afternoon of talks, seminars and workshops entitled 'Ethical Leadership : Leading Businesses Responsibly' is being held at the University of Bradford School of Management.

The event - which takes place on Wednesday, April 20 - is a chance for students, business leaders and academics to get together and discuss ethics in business.

It will get under way at 1pm with a light lunch before headline speaker, award-winning Bradford Management School Executive MBA student James Peacock takes to the stage at 1.30pm.

James, who works for Wessex Water, is a chartered environmentalist, chartered waste manager and winner of the Bradford School of Management 50th anniversary MBA scholarship. He was recently named as one of the five rising stars in waste management by RWM; was the winner of the 2015 Institute of Business Ethics essay award and the finalist for the AMBA’s MBA student of the year award.

At this year’s PRME event on Ethical Leadership, James will be talking about his Zero Waste to Landfill project, which aims to make Wessex Water the first zero waste utility company in the UK. He will bring insights of how he has been leading the project and how the project is leading the industry to reduce waste to landfill.

From 3.30pm to 5pm, Bradford professors Jackie Ford (pictured) and Ann Cunliffe will give talks and run workshops.

Prof Ford will give a 15 minute talk on ‘Ethical Leadership and the Dark Side’ at 3.30pm.

At 3.35pm attendees will be split into smaller groups to discuss two questions:
What are some of the ethical issues in organisations today?
What does it mean to be an ethical leader?

The group will then reconvene at 4.25pm when Prof Cunliffe and Prof Ford will lead a discussion on the main theme of the event.

The afternoon will draw to a close when Prof Cunliffe gives a talk entitled, Reflexivity, leadership and Paul Ricœur.

The event is being held as part of the Principles for Responsible Management Education initiative, which was launched in 2007 at the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit in Geneva.

It aims to inspire and champion responsible management education, research and thought leadership globally.

Prof Cunliffe is Professor of Organization Studies at Bradford School of Management. She also holds a Visiting Professor position at Escola de Administraçâo da Fundaçâo Getulio Vargas, Brazil.

Her research interests lie at the intersection of organizational studies, philosophy and communications, exploring how leaders and managers shape responsive and ethical organizations.

She has published four books including a Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Management (2014).

She recently won the 2016 Lasting Impact Award from the Teaching Society for Management Educators (OBTS) and Sage Publishing for her her article, ‘On becoming a critically reflective practitioner’.

Prof Ford is Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at Bradford School of Management.

Her research interests include studies of working lives, with a particular interest in making sense of leadership, gender, ethics, and management practices.

She has co-authored a monograph entitled Leadership as Identity: Constructions and Deconstructions (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008); co-edited Making Public Services Management Critical (Routledge, 2010); co-edited a textbook entitled Leadership: Contemporary critical perspectives (Sage, 2015); and has published in a range of journals.

Business in the Community will be supporting the event and have a representative there offering a 'Responsible Business Check-up' throughout the afternoon.

Timetable:
1pm Light lunch (available at YJ0.07 or YJ0.04)
1.25pm Opening done by acting Dean (if available).
1.30-3pm Session One: Presentation by James Peacock Wessex Water
3-3.30pm Coffee Break
3.30pm Ethical leadership and the dark side by Prof Jackie Ford
3.45pm Breakout session: Small groups to address questions on ethics
4.25pm Plenary discussion facilitated by Prof Ann Cunliffe and Prof Jackie Ford
4.45pm A talk on Reflexivity, leadership and Paul Ricoeur by Prof Ann Cunliffe
5pm Close

Find out more about PRME.

University of Bradford School of Law launches free legal advice clinic

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A free weekly legal advice clinic has been launched by the University of Bradford School of Law.

Working in partnership with the Bradford and Airedale Citizens Advice Bureau and Law Centre, the Law Clinic offers comprehensive legal advice to those who might otherwise be unable to access justice.

The newly-formed clinic is supervised by University law lecturer and barrister Ian Miller.

Working under his close supervision, final year law students of the University of Bradford will be providing written legal advice to members of the general public on a whole range of legal matters from contractual disputes to family law issues.

Clinic director Ian Miller, who is a practising barrister at Broadway House Chambers, said: “The advice offered by the students will involve informing clients of their legal position and whether they might go about issuing proceedings and, if so, how. If appropriate, the students will write a letter for their client to send to the other party.

“As well as providing a valuable service to the community, the work of the clinic is an integral part of the educational development of the students involved in the project.

“The students who have enrolled to work in the clinic are some of our brightest and most dedicated students.

“They are excited at the prospect of using the knowledge and skills that they have built up over the last two years of their study to help members of their local community.”

He added: “I am excited at the opportunity of showcasing some of our best students whilst helping them to hone their skills and prepare them for a world beyond education.”

Areas of law the students have been dealing with include debt, neighbour disputes, divorce and financial disputes, wills and family cases.

Law student Sannah Khatoon said the experience she is gaining by working in the clinic is invaluable.

“It has been a really positive experience,” she said. “It’s different to anything I’ve had the opportunity to do before and very beneficial to my studies."

“A topic that I have not yet studied came up – debt recovery – so it gave me the opportunity to research that area. I have learned about the Limitation Act 1980 and how old debts are not always recoverable.”

She added: “I now look forward to using my new knowledge to send the client written advice on the matter.”

Sannah’s fellow student, Robin Bennett said dealing with real-life cases has been an excellent addition to his studies. “Being involved in the Law Clinic is really interesting,” he said. “It builds on the skills we have learned studying at the School of Law.

“Last week we had a divorce case involving the division of assets. Last semester I undertook a Family Law module and so I felt very confident in giving advice.

“This morning we had a case regarding a will. A lady wanted advice regarding her husband’s estate because he hadn’t left a will. We are now going to do some research on it and discuss it with some qualified solicitors to be able to give the best advice.”

The Law Clinic’s operations will not simply be limited to advising the public as the lecturers and students of the Law School will be engaging in research into the effects in the city of the reductions in the availability of legal aid and other cuts in funding which are reducing access to justice.

The research will look at how the university can collaborate with providers of legal advice from both the private and charitable sectors to try a fill the void left by cuts in funding.

Robin Lister, senior lecturer at Bradford Law School, said: “The city is fortunate to have a number of agencies who can offer free legal advice to members of the public and many law firms also offer free or ‘pro-bono’ legal advice in certain cases.

“What we at the university seek to do is understand more about the provision of that free legal advice: what advice is available, who most needs it, what gaps exist and how might we go about filling them?”

Ian Miller said that due to funding cuts legal advice in some areas is becoming a preserve of the wealthy.

“The extinguishing of legal aid for many types of family and civil cases has meant that a substantial number of members of our community are unable to access basic legal advice on matters which affect them greatly,” he said.

“Although agencies such as the CAB and Law Centre provide valuable and far reaching advice of a very high quality, there is a plain lack of advice available to those who have family or civil legal problems.

“People speak of ‘justice deserts’; that phrase is by no means an exaggeration. Justice Bradford, as we have termed it, aims to open up legal advice to those who most desperately need it. Justice Bradford will not tolerate a justice desert in our city.”

The law clinic is being held every Wednesday during term time. Clients will receive full and comprehensive written advice within three weeks.

Appointments are held on a Wednesday at the Bradford Citizens Advice Bureau office and can be accessed by attending one of the CAB service drop-in sessions or via the advice line on 03442 451 282. Where an appointment with the Law Clinic is appropriate it will be booked following the CAB initial assessment. Details of Citizens Advice Bradford and Airedale and Bradford Law Centre can be found on the following website.

Dame Ellen MacArthur honoured with Global Achievement Award

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Dame Ellen MacArthur was honoured with a University of Bradford Global Achievement Award as part of the new Chancellor's installation on Thursday night.

Professor of Innovation and Environmental Strategy at the School of Management, Peter Hopkinson praised the many achievements of Dame MacArthur, as a record-breaking round-the-world yachtswoman and in establishing her foundation in 2009 to address key economic and resource challenges.

In his speech, Prof Hopkinson said: "Ellen’s work, bringing new thinking and ability to create a positive agenda for change for the benefit of everyone is a source of inspiration. The University of Bradford has worked with Ellen and her team since the start of the foundation and our work on circular economy education, research and business engagement led to our recognition as a Global Pioneer University for the circular economy in 2015.

"These awards recognise truly exceptional people who are leaders and who transform our thinking. People who have achieved greatness through an ability to crystallise ideas and communicate them clearly to different audiences. Those who have met Ellen will bear testimony to her clarity of thought, passion and determination but also her down-to-earth nature.

"I hope recognising Ellen’s achievements with this award will help inspire us all to see the possibility for change at a time when we need to be re-thinking our collective future.

"Ellen has strong connections with Bradford. Her mother and grandmother were born here, although sadly she missed out on this particular honour and was bought up in Derbyshire, living on a small holding, which was a strong formative experience as she grew up.

"Ellen became fascinated by sailing from an early age and recounts how whilst at primary school she would often skip school meals to save up for her first boat. She had ambitions to go to University and study to become a vet but was struck down by glandular fever before her A-levels and ended up following a different path. The illness led to a great discovery. While ill she saw a documentary about professional sailing and a round the world race. At this moment she realized that she could combine her passion for competitive sailing and earn a living.

"Ellen MacArthur made yachting history in 2005, when she became the fastest solo sailor to circumnavigate the globe at just 24 years of age, and remains the UK’s most successful offshore racer ever, having won the OSTAR, the Route du Rhum and finished second in the Vendée Globe.

"Her experiences of being in a boat 3,000 miles from land with just enough energy and resource to complete a trip made Ellen acutely aware of the finite nature of the resources our economy relies upon. This became such a passion that Ellen gave up competitive sailing in 2008.

"Ellen then spent two years travelling and talking to a wide range of researchers and business leaders to develop a deeper understanding of how our economies might work better in the future. In 2009 she launched to launch the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, to work with education and business to accelerate the transition to a different economic model, that was termed the regenerative circular economy.

"The Foundation now has a team of 70 staff working on research, education, policy and business impact in support of the transition to a circular economy. Ellen set up the CE100, the foremost business, education and policy network globally with companies including Apple, Unilever, Renault, Cisco, Philips, Ikea, Marks & Spencer, and a number of cities and across the world.

"The Foundation has published a series of seminal macro-economic studies on the economic and business case for a circular economy, which have received accolades at the World Economic Forum in Davos and have been instrumental in shaping recent EU policy.

"Dame Ellen acts as Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Meta-Council on the circular economy.

"She received the French Legion of Honour from President Nicolas Sarkozy in 2008, three years after having been knighted.

"In 2015 Ellen became a full member of the Club of Rome, a foremost association of independent leading personalities from politics, business and science, men and women who are long-term thinkers interested in contributing in a systemic interdisciplinary and holistic manner to a better world.

"Ellen has not altogether left sailing. For many years she has devoted considerable time to Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust which she founded to provide young people with cancer the opportunity to experience the pleasure and thrill of ocean sailing.

"The work of Ellen and her foundation matches the University’s commitment towards sustainable societies and our belief in the role of education, policy, business engagement, research and practical demonstration to create a better world.

"Ellen is passionate about the need to inspire a generation to think differently about the future and the role of Universities to be pioneers and societal leaders in helping to shape, rather than just reacting to global events. She has shown what can be achieved in a short period of time when you have clarity of purpose and passion."

The University honoured three other inspirational world leaders in their field with a 50th Anniversary Global Achievement Award. They were Sir Paul Nurse, Professor Dame Athene Donald and Professor Amartya Sen.

The awards formed part of the installation ceremony of one of the UK's leading businesswomen and alumna of the University of Bradford School of Management, Kate Swann, as new Chancellor.

World expert in family business is new Dean at Faculty of Management and Law

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Despite leaving school at 16, the new Interim Dean of the University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law has carved out an international reputation as a respected academic.

Although she did not follow the conventional route of doing A-levels at 18 and going straight to university, new Dean Professor Carole Howorth’s ambitious personality was already evident when she set up her first business at 19.

That ambition has clearly continued to develop throughout her life.

Professor Howorth, who officially took up the Deanship today, did not enter Higher Education until more than a decade later. Once in the university environment she excelled and now has a strong vision for the School of Management as its Dean, starting with strengthening the reputation of the School internationally.

“I’m very excited about stepping up into the Dean role,” she said. “There are two major focus points I want to work on.

“Firstly, we can do more to develop the School of Management’s excellent reputation internationally. We have very strong links across the world but we want to make more of those connections and continue to develop Bradford as a global brand.

“Secondly, there is huge potential for the University to do even more with businesses, both locally and internationally. We can work with businesses in research, executive education and consultancy.

“We like to work in partnership with businesses because it’s about sharing knowledge with each other and with our students. The University isn’t an ivory tower; we do research and teaching that aims to make a difference. Our students go on placement and work on company projects as part of their studies. Our academics share knowledge by working with businesses and public sector organisations on bespoke programmes and research projects.

“We’ll be looking to build more partnerships to share the knowledge that’s created in the University and to learn from businesses."

She is hugely proud of her home city of Bradford, its history and its university.

“Bradford’s a great place to live and work. We have fabulous countryside on our doorstep. Since moving back here, I’ve been really pleased to see how the city is being developed and the positive vibe that is being created.”

Although Professor Howorth did not go on to do A-levels at school her talent did not go unrecognised.

“I was a Bradford Girls Grammar School girl and I was tipped for Oxbridge entry, but I had to leave school at 16 for family reasons,” she said.

“My family struggled to support me through the school, even though I had a scholarship. That’s one of the reasons why I am passionate about access to education. I’m really pleased that the University is developing more foundation degrees to give people a second chance.”

After leaving school Professor Howorth worked at a travel agents in Shipley and as a quantity surveyor’s assistant at Bradford Metropolitan District Council, before qualifying as a riding instructor on a government Training and Opportunities Scheme (TOPS) at Harrogate Equestrian Centre and setting up an equine business at her family’s farm.

Her sister joined the business when she was old enough and Throstle Nest Riding Stables continues to thrive over 30 years later, with Professor Howorth’s niece being lined up to take the reins.

Professor Howorth said: “I came away from the riding business when I was about 30. I wanted to use my brain more. I had done a couple of A-levels at night school but that wasn’t enough to get into university so I did an access course at Bradford College.

“I did my first degree at what was The Management Centre*. When I started the course I had no idea where it was going to take me.

“I knew I was intelligent but I wasn’t sure where I was going with it. I got first class honours and a prize for best student.”

Professor Howorth’s potential was obviously spotted by the School because she was encouraged to apply for an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) scholarship and study for her PhD, which focused on late payments and the funding of small businesses.

While studying for her doctorate she was an academic tutor at The Management Centre (the previous name of the Bradford School of Management). This led to her first lectureship at Nottingham University Business School in Entrepreneurship and Finance. She then moved to a senior lecturer post at Lancaster University Management School, where she progressed to Professor of Entrepreneurship and Family Business.

It was while at Lancaster that she founded the Centre for Family Business Research and she was ranked number two in the world (outside of the USA) for family business research. She was invited to join the STEP (Successful Transgenerational Entrepreneurship Practices) global family enterprising project and became the European leader. Since being at Bradford, Professor Howorth has become the global chair of the project, which includes 40 member universities across the world. The project is administered by Babson College in the USA, which is the number one university in the world for entrepreneurship education and research.

The partner universities work with family businesses in their area to help develop entrepreneurship across generations.

Now, much of her time is taken up with planning and implementing strategies for the Faculty as the Dean, but she still manages to continue her research interests.

Family businesses and entrepreneurship have been a focus of the research and teaching throughout Professor Howorth’s academic career.

Professor Howorth’s current research, funded by the Institute for Family Business (IFB) Research Foundation, is focused on the next generation of family businesses.

“Going from one generation to another can be a critical juncture for family businesses,” she says. “For example, if the next generation isn’t interested in being part of the family firm the future of the business could be in jeopardy – putting jobs at risk. I have been looking at how the next generation can be more engaged in the family business.”

She added: “I’ve always been keen to question assumptions, myths and generalisations about small businesses and family businesses. My background allows me to question ingrained thinking and theories on these businesses.”


* The Management Centre in Bradford predates the university by three years, having been established in 1963. It was one of the first management schools in the country.

Two Bradford School of Management work placement successes return to find new staff

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Two alumni of the University of Bradford School of Management recently returned for a careers networking event which showcased some of the high calibre of current students.

Lyndsey Shaw and Waheed Ali both did a one year work placement for the companies they now work for.

Lyndsey, who graduated in Accounting and Finance BSc in 2006, is now a partner at Sterling Corporate Finance, and Waheed Ali, who graduated from the same course in 2013, works at 1825, a financial planning company part of the Standard Life Group.

Both Lyndsey and Waheed returned to the School of Management for the ‘Keeping Talent in Yorkshire’ event in a bid to source talented students for placements, internships and potential graduate jobs for their respective companies.

The event gives businesses from across Yorkshire a chance to meet a group of pre-screened first and second year students.

Lyndsey, pictured right talking to students at Keeping Talent in Yorkshire, clearly impressed Sterling because when her 12-month period was coming to an end the partners said they would like to offer her a job when she completed her degree.

“I was over the moon when I was offered a graduate job,” said Lyndsey. “I had always wanted to be an accountant and planned to take the traditional route of working for three years in audit whilst I studied for my qualifications.

“During my time on placement at Sterling I realised that the audit side of things wasn’t for me - Sterling doesn’t do audit or tax, it’s purely corporate finance, so I was really pleased when I was offered a graduate job.”

Sterling also took Lyndsey on for one afternoon a week while she was studying in her final year, so that she could keep up-to-date with developments at the company.

Lyndsey says studying at Bradford School of Management played a big part in enabling her to realise her ambitions.

“I really enjoyed my time at the School of Management," she said. "It’s a lovely campus and the staff, both teaching and support staff, were always very helpful. There was always a nice atmosphere at the campus which I found engendered a positive attitude towards studying.

“I am from Bradford and had always planned to go away to university but a close family friend was on the University of Bradford board at the time and he told me all about the School of Management and how well it was doing in the league tables.”

She added: “After visiting I was sold - even though it meant staying at home!”

After Lyndsey joined Sterling, the firm did not take a placement student for the next few years. However, recently the company has started taking placement students again, and chooses to source them from the School of Management.

Lyndsey said: “Humaas Khan is our second placement student since we reinstated the programme. We are planning to take another student at the end of this year, making it our third year.”

“The job that the student does at Sterling is a real job, if we didn’t employ a student then we would have to go to the market and employ somebody else to do it.

Waheed got his role with 1825 also after securing a year placement with the firm as part of his course.

He said: “During my placement at 1825 I was given the opportunity to engage in many projects which allowed me to show my skills to senior management.

“It was a fantastic experience which allowed me to work for a global company and view business from a very high level.

“Once I graduated I contacted 1825 and they have me a job with an immediate start without an interview!

“The company has now offered to pay for my Chartered Insurance Institute exams and they have tailored a graduate programme to suit me.”

Waheed added that he chose Bradford for its excellent reputation, as well as the School having a resemblance to the alma mater of Harry Potter.

“Other than its uncanny resemblance to Hogwarts, Bradford School of Management has the coveted Triple Crown of accreditations. It’s also ranked number one in the whole of Yorkshire,” he said.

Waheed’s manager at 1825, Kath McKenna said the partnership with the School of Management has been very successful.

“We have been working with the School of Management for a number of years and attended the first ever careers event,” she said.

“It gives us access to high calibre candidates for our internships and placements and we are often spoilt for choice. We have provided internships for seven students, placement years for two and have employed two alumni.”

University of Bradford School of Management lecturer to present research into low-paid workers in multiple jobs to trades unions

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A senior lecturer at the University of Bradford School of Management, together with his colleague, will be on the bill alongside a Labour MP and a Lord when they present their research at a trade union conference.

, who lectures in Human Resource Management and Employment Relations, and Dr Jo McBride of Newcastle University are conducting research into low-paid workers in multiple employment, which has never been conducted in the UK before.

The preliminary findings of their project – ‘The Forgotten Workers: Low Paid Workers in Multiple Employment’ – will be presented at a conference to representatives of the Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers (USDAW) on March 12 at Redworth Hall, County Durham.

Labour MP Yvette Cooper, Lord Kennedy of Southwark and Zoey Purdy of Mencap are also speaking at the event.

At the conference they will highlight their initial findings and also aim to gain access to more research participants.

“People working in low-paid multiple jobs is a major issue, but no one has carried out qualitative research on this social phenomenon before,” said Dr Smith.

“We’ve spoken to people with two, three, four, even five jobs. The types of jobs tend to be in the cleaning, catering, security and social care sectors.

“The working times cover unsocial hours – early morning, evenings, nights, and weekends, therefore, it becomes very difficult to have a reasonable work-life balance or any quality family time.

“A common link is that these people have a strong work ethic – all take great pride in what they do. However, they don’t generally feel appreciated by their managers and employers.

“We need a holistic approach to look at issues of low-pay, working hours, and the quality and experience of work”

Andrew added: “Our aim is to publicise our findings as widely as possible, and engage with academics and user groups.”

Following the USDAW conference, Dr Smith and Dr McBride will be presenting their initial research findings at the Northern Trades Union Congress conference in Leeds on April 3.

Houses of Parliament venue for University of Bradford School of Management academic's seminar

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Portcullis House at the Houses of Parliament will be the venue for a University of Bradford School of Management academic's next seminar.

The seminar forms part of a series supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and will see an international panel debate on Information Sharing for Public Services: What can the UK learn from the United States and New Zealand?

Speaking at the event will be Prof Sharon Dawes, from the Centre for Technology in Government from Albany University in the USA, and Prof Miriam Lips, from the School of Government at Victoria University in New Zealand.

The debate will be chaired by Chi Onwurah, Labour MP for Newcastle Central and participating on the panel will be Matt Warman, Conservative MP for Boston and Skegness.

The ESRC seminar series, which is headed by Prof Rob Wilson of Newcastle University, includes Bradford School of Management Organisational Behaviour lecturer Dr Sue Richardson, Professor Sue Baines from Manchester Metropolitan University, James Cornford from the University of East Anglia and professor Nick Frost from Leeds Beckett University.

The academics are partnered by the Centre for Excellence for Information Sharing http://informationsharing.co.uk/ . Past seminars have covered topics as diverse as families, smart places and integrated health and social care.

Dr Richardson said: “Securing a seminar in Westminster Hall has enabled us to get some very prominent people to attend to hear the arguments around information sharing.

“This seminar aims to bring together politicians, policy-makers, IT managers, public and third sector practitioners, and anyone interested in the way information sharing is changing the way public services are delivered and the nature of the relationships between the state and its citizens and citizen with each other and their communities.”

“Information sharing is a central concern across policy domains such as health, crime, education and employment.

“Disasters and tragedies have repeatedly been attributed to the failure of agencies to share information.

“Attempts have been made to fix the problem through a variety of legislative, policy and IT approaches, yet individuals and organisations still struggle to share and communicate information effectively.”

Dr Richardson added: “Austerity measures are having significant effects as public services everywhere try to do more with less by harnessing information sharing to avoid duplication and repetition.

“Our current knowledge suggests that the exchange and management of data between organisations and practitioners involved in the delivery of public service has often proved extremely hard to achieve, in particular where sharing involves multiple professions and organisations with different values, standards and traditions.”

In what is quite a coup, The Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour Group of Bradford School of Management has two separate ESRC seminar series running concurrently. The other focuses on women professionals and leaders in the media. http://www.brad.ac.uk/management/news/esrc-seminar-series-march-2016.php

Booking for the seminar - which takes place on Wednesday, March 9, from 6.30-8.30pm in the House of Commons - is essential.

Find out more about the Seminar Series on Information Sharing.

BIOGRAPHIES
Professor Rob Wilson
Rob is a Professor at Newcastle University where he directs a university research centre (KITE) and teaches in the Business School. His research interests are in public service innovation and socio-technical systems: the role that data, information and information systems play in inter-organisational innovation and relationships.
He has over twenty years of experience working on and leading public sector information system research and development projects. He has lectured widely on collaboration and information systems in public sector contexts. His most recent book is published by Oxford University Press and is entitled Digital Government at Work: A Social Informatics Perspective. He is currently leading on an ESRC Seminar Series on Information Sharing in collaboration with the Centre of Excellence for Information Sharing and colleagues from the universities of Bradford, East Anglia and Manchester Metropolitan.
Professor Sharon Dawes
Sharon Dawes is Professor emerita of Public Administration and Policy and Informatics and senior fellow at the Centre for Technology in Government (CTG) at Albany University, USA. Before coming to CTG, she was executive director of the New York State Forum for Information Resource Management, and an executive fellow at the Rockefeller Institute of Government.
A fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Sharon was elected the first president of the Digital Government Society of North America in 2006. She serves on advisory committees for the US National Science Foundation, the National Archives and Records Administration, and the United Nations University. She has been honoured with leadership awards from public, private, and academic organizations.
Professor Miriam Lips
Professor Miriam Lips is Professor of Digital Government at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Government, where she leads and undertakes a five-year research programme on ‘Government and Democracy in the Digital Age’ in partnership with the Department of Internal Affairs, Inland Revenue Department, the Ministry of Education and Datacom Systems Ltd. Miriam is a Steering Group Member of Victoria University of Wellington’s Spearheading our Digital Futures Distinctiveness Theme and until recently was the Programme Director of the Master of e-Government programme offered at Victoria University. Prior to moving to New Zealand, Miriam held academic positions at the University of Oxford and Tilburg University. She completed a PhD in Public Administration at Erasmus University Rotterdam in 1996.
Professor Lips recently was an appointed Member of the New Zealand Data Futures Forum, an independent task force set up by the Ministers of Finance and Statistics to examine, report and engage widely on how New Zealand could maximise the benefits of the data revolution, while minimising the risks of potential harm, such as privacy and security breaches and the unethical use of data. She currently is an appointed Member of the New Zealand Data Futures Partnership, an independent Working Group which reports to the Ministers of Finance, Justice and Statistics. Miriam also has been recently appointed as Deputy Chair of the New Zealand Open Government Partnership Stakeholder Advisory Group.
Professor Lips has published widely in the field of Digital Government and Democracy, with 9 books as author, co-author or editor, and many publications in leading international journals including Public Management Review, Information, Communication & Society, Public Administration, Public Money & Management, International Journal of Public Administration, Information Polity, and Media, Culture & Society. She is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Information Polity. Government and Democracy in the information age (IOS Press) and an Editorial Board Member of Information, Communication & Society, Government Information Quarterly, and Policy & Internet. Miriam also is an Appointed Member of the Management Board at Large of the International Research Society of Public Management since 2013. For more information about Professor Lips’ research, teaching and engagement activities, please visit VUW’s Digital Government programme website at http://e-government.vuw.ac.nz
Chi Onwurah MP
Chi Onwurah is a British Member of Parliament representing Newcastle upon Tyne Central and is also Shadow Minister for Culture & the Digital Economy.
From Jan 2013 - Sept 2015 Chi was Shadow Cabinet Office Minister leading on cyber security, social entrepreneurship, civil contingency, open government and transparency. From Oct 2010 – Jan 2013 Chi was Shadow Minister for Innovation, Science & Digital Infrastructure working closely with the Science and business community, with industry on Broadband issues, and on the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill. Chi continues to encourage women in STEM.
Prior to Chi’s election to Parliament in May 2010 she worked as Head of Telecom's Technology at the UK regulator Ofcom focussing on the implications for competition and regulation of the services and technologies associated with Next Generation Networks.
Prior to Ofcom, Chi was a Partner in Hammatan Ventures, a US technology consultancy, developing the GSM markets in Nigeria and South Africa. Previously she was Director of Market Development with Teligent, a Global Wireless Local Loop operator and Director of Product Strategy at GTS. She has also worked for Cable & Wireless and Nortel as Engineer, Project and Product Manager in the UK and France.
Chi is a Chartered Engineer with a BEng in Electrical Engineering from Imperial College London and an MBA from Manchester Business School. She was born in Wallsend and attended Kenton Comprehensive School in Newcastle, where she was elected the school’s ‘MP’ in mock elections aged 17.
Matt Warman MP
Matt Warman is the newly elected Member of Parliament for Boston and Skegness. Retaining the seat for the Conservatives with a majority of 4,336, he campaigned on a commitment to improve communication between Westminster and the electorate, and increasing investment in Lincolnshire’s roads, broadband and public services.
Prior to entering politics, Matt worked for the Daily Telegraph from 1999 until 2015, focusing for most of the period on technology, leading coverage of Facebook, Google and Apple, and covering the launch of products including iPhones, the BBC iPlayer and the Apple Watch, as well as interviewing key figures including the founder of Amazon, Jeff Bezos, and Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web.
In Parliament, Matt is a member of the Science and Technology Select Committee, and Co-Chairs the All Party Parliamentary Group on Broadband and Digital Communication and Pictfor (The Parliamentary Internet, Communications and Technology Forum).

Bradford School of Management online MBA tops 2016 Financial Times world rankings for increasing salary

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For the second year running the Bradford School of Management Distance Learning MBA is ranked the world's number one for increasing salary in the 2016 Financial Times Online MBA global rankings. On average MBA graduates at Bradford have increased their salary by 47%.

One of just three business schools in the UK that make the rankings, the course is also ranked number two in the world in the value for money category. Overall the University of Bradford School of Management is in the Global top ten, based on its three year average.

It is also rated as a global leader for its diversity, ranking number two in the world for its international mix of students and tops the list for women staff in the faculty.

Thanks to that diversity, the course ranks fourth in the world for international mobility.
Director of Studies for the Distance Learning MBA, Dr Jay Muir said: “The FT rankings are really pleasing. However, we are constantly seeking to improve and we are currently reviewing , adding new subjects and features, ensuring that our MBA students have the opportunity to study contemporary business issues at a time, place and pace which suits their individual needs.”

Interim Dean, Prof Carole Howorth said: “This is a great result for the school. I would like to thank our alumni for participating in the survey who provide feedback on the programme, their career progress and salary three years after graduation.

“Our alumni’s continued career success is a vital part of our success as a school. I was particularly delighted to see that overall the Distance Learning MBA alumni have achieved a 47% increase in salary.”

Prof Howorth added: “We remain committed to maintaining our good position in the FT rankings, continuing to build the fine reputation of University of Bradford School of Management.”

The School of Management has not only been a pioneer in launching one of the world’s first distance learning MBAs back in 1998, it has more recently introduced the .

This MBA was conceived and developed with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation to take the lead in a business curriculum focused on the principles of the circular economy and sustainable development.

The programme is endorsed by the United Nations for its support of Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) and supports Bradford’s strategy to be one of the world’s most sustainable universities.

School of Management professor contributes to book on circular economy for Ellen MacArthur Foundation

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An expert in circular economy at School of Management has written a chapter in a book being published by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation - an official partner of the University of Bradford.

Peter Hopkinson, who is Professor of Innovation and Environmental Strategy, has written the chapter in A New Dynamic 2: Effective systems in a circular economy. The book analyses and seeks to provide insights into a new regenerative framework for economic prosperity.

Working with Markus Zils and Phil Hawkins, Prof Hopkinson wrote Challenges and capabilities for scaling up circular economy business models - A change in management perspective.

Prof Hopkinson, who set up and runs the Global Distance Learning MBA in Innovation, Enterprise and Circular Economy, said: “In the chapter we examine the increasing number of successful circular economy business models.

“The question is no longer whether the economic opportunities are there, but rather how to manage the transition from a linear to a circular model.”

The Ellen MacArthur Foundation's publication series A New Dynamic invites key thinkers, business leaders and academics to share their latest ideas and research on circular economy topics. Each volume tackles a specific theme and reflects on the potential and implications of a regenerative economic framework.

The second book in the series reflects on the necessity to develop a whole-system approach to re-thinking the global economy.

Eighteen authors from different horizons, from architecture to farming, share their methodology and provide real life case studies illustrating the application of circular economy principles and their potential.

Their aim is to see beyond the boundaries of their respective areas of expertise, and establish the necessary connections to re-think the current development path.

The University of Bradford and Ellen MacArthur Foundation has created an ambitious academic partnership to support and develop teaching and research programmes around the circular economy.

The University of Bradford’s new £6m re:centre is a hub for research, knowledge transfer, education and business activities around the circular economy.

For more details about the book or to preorder a copy.

Bradford School of Management professor writes book on leadership to reflect contemporary debates

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After becoming frustrated that there was not a suitable textbook for her course, an international expert in leadership at the University of Bradford School of Management set about writing one herself.

Jackie Ford, Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies at Bradford School of Management, teamed up with Dr Brigid Carroll, of the University of Auckland, and Dr Scott Taylor, of the University of Birmingham, to write Leadership: Contemporary Critical Perspectives.

The book, which was recently shortlisted in the Management and Leadership Textbook category of the CMI Management Book of the Year Awards 2016, guides students through key concepts, contemporary issues and debates in leadership studies.

Prof Ford said: “It was borne out of a frustration that we couldn’t find a textbook we would like to give to our students to support and help their learning and guide their thinking that was a bit more up to date, while also critical of the taken-for-granted debates in the field.”

To bring theories to life the book uses case studies of various political and business leaders, including Tony Blair and Steve Jobs, as well as from leadership in the arts and gang culture.

The book includes a fully-accessible student resource with videos, journal articles and links to related content. Students also have access to a ‘Leadership on screen’ feature, which encourages analysis of how leadership is represented in film and television, including The Dark Knight, Game of Thrones, The Hunger Games and Grey’s Anatomy.

Fellow University of Bradford School of Management academics, and , have also written chapters in the book.

A number of leading academics in their field have praised the book, including Prof Alison Pullen, of Macquarie University in Sydney.

She said: “The field of leadership has been waiting for Leadership: Critical Contemporary Perspectives. Putting power into the heart of leadership, this book will change the landscape of leadership in practice and convey the nuances and complexities of leadership thought.”

Prof Dennis Tourish, of University of London School of Management, said: “This excellent book provokes and inspires throughout. Conventional leadership theory has made its own contribution to our world's problems by encouraging leaders to concentrate too much power in their own hands. Contributors to this wise book challenge this approach, and offer radically fresh perspectives on numerous other issues as well. It will be impossible to look at leadership in the same way again.”

Leadership: Contemporary Critical Perspectives is published by Sage and available to buy online, where there is also a video of the authors discussing the book.

Bradford School of Management students celebrate success at business competition

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Two students from the University of Bradford School of Management are celebrating after impressing judges at an international businesses competition last weekend.

Ten students represented the School of Management at the Durham Business Games, which is sponsored by companies including Asda, Unilever and WPP.

Nearly 200 students from universities across the UK and Europe, including Aberystwyth, Leeds, Durham, York and teams from the Netherlands and Italy, took part in four challenges over the two-day event at Durham University.

student Angeliki Tzempetzi, pictured with her certificate, was in the winning team of the Asda Walmart competition on the Saturday.

The Asda Walmart competition saw teams tasked with marketing a new juice drink for children, by creating a new logo, choosing a name, setting the price and deciding on a promotional campaign for Asda stores. Angeliki's team won with their ‘Super Six’ drink.

Angeliki said: "The Asda task was the challenge I found the most interesting as it was concerned with marketing sector, which is an area I really like.

"I am really glad that I won this challenge. It was my idea to promote the drink with characters representing different sports in order to get the attention of children.

"As an overall experience, it was totally worth it as I gained more experience in terms of presenting in front of many people and it also gave me the opportunity of networking with other students."

Thanks to being in the winning team, Angeliki has now been given a fast-track place to the interview stage of the Asda graduate recruitment process.

Durham Business Game group shot

student Kwame Adu-Gyamfi was a finalist in the Unilever competition, which saw teams tasked with designing a one-day campaign for one of the company’s ice cream brands, with a £5,000 budget.

After being briefed on the challenge by two Unilever executives, teams made up of four people, making up nearly 200 people, were given one hour and 45 minutes to design their campaign and plan a presentation.

The Unilever executives then whittled the entrants down to just three teams for the final presentation, including Kwame’s team.

Kwame, pictured above on the far left with all of the Bradford School of Management students at the Durham Business Game, said: “My team decided on a campaign slogan of ‘Break the Ice’. The plan was to market the Cornetto brand by launching a campaign at Freshers Week at Durham University, which would see students be able to call up a Cornetto representative when they’d met a new friend, the rep would then deliver two Cornettos on a branded ice cream tricycle.

“I was the only one in my group from a finance background so I focused on that side of things. We also looked at the HR, logistics and supply chain aspects.”

He added: “It was a really beneficial experience for me. It made me focus on deadlines and leadership issues. I’m sure it will help me in my future careers.”

As well as his success at the Durham Business Games, Kwame recently set up the University of Bradford Investment Society, with the guidance of Prof Helena Pinto.

The students’ trip to Durham and accommodation was paid for by the Bradford School of Management alumni fund.

'To make a positive difference in the world you need to think big' - University of Bradford backs man's huge 1,000-year Earth Pyramid Project

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Listening to Steve Ward feels like being transported to a parallel universe.

A world where conventional barriers do not exist: one where nothing is impossible.

Steve is in the process of bringing a big plan to fruition. A very big plan. A plan that involves building a $1billion ‘Earth Pyramid’ in Malaysia that will generate $billions for environment and peace charities across the world. He wants it to be the most important monument of our time, offering a 1,000 year legacy.

Earth Pyramid inside Arup

On first hearing Steve talk about his project it’s so ambitious it sounds bonkers, but Steve doesn’t let people think his dreams are too big to stop him. His energy and enthusiasm is unstoppable.

The vision was born back in December 2009 when Steve, a landscaper who was born in the UK but raised in New Zealand, was sat round the kitchen table with his family at home in West Yorkshire.

His daughter Stephanie had heard about the UN Climate Change Conference taking place in Copenhagen on the news.

It prompted her to ask her parents, “Why can’t we do something to help the planet for future generations?”

Steve and his wife Vicky didn’t want to sound defeatist so the Ward family set about thinking of ideas of how to promote environmental issues. They got on to discussing famous landmarks of the world they hit upon the idea of building a new pyramid that could act as a monument to promoting peace and protecting the environment. The plan was that the pyramid would be a giant, global time capsule.

“Peace and environmental matters are two of the biggest issues our children will face in the future, but they are two of the most underfunded areas of education,” said Steve.

“To make a positive difference in the world you need to think big. To tackle these issues we need to generate vast sums of money – the Earth Pyramid will try to do this in a fun, exciting and thought-provoking way.”

Within days the Ward family had formed a letter outlining their vision and sent it out to as many world leaders as they could.

They got six positive responses within the first two weeks, then 13 more positive responses in the following 12 months, including former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, and the presidents of Ecuador, Madagascar and Seychelles, as well as the President of Timor-Leste, Jose Ramos-Horta, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1996.

Among the global peace activists backing the project is Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town and Noble Peace Laureate, Desmond Tutu.

He said: “Any project that aims to get the people of the world working together in a positive way is worth supporting, and the Earth Pyramid is such a project.

“To create a monument that celebrates the many different cultures that make up our planet and gives children from around the world a chance to have their hopes and dreams recorded for future generations is a great idea.”

Steve and his family have continued to develop their big plan – now officially known as the Earth Pyramid Project (EPP) – and the dream is on its way to becoming a reality.

The Earth Pyramid will stand 50m tall, with each side measuring four 70m at its base. As well at the pyramid and time capsule chambers, there will also be an education centre.

Steve said: “The aim of the Earth Pyramid Project is to create a monument that every nation and an entire generation of the world’s children can contribute to.

“With the many issues the world is facing it is now more important than ever for us to start working together to educate and prepare our children for the challenges they will be facing in their lifetimes.”

The University of Bradford has been offering expert advice since the early days of the project. The School of Management has helped with financial planning, and the Peace and Engineering departments now also supporting the scheme.

Steve said: “Bradford were the first people to help and get involved. The MBA students at the School of Management have been a huge help - they researched and helped with the business planning of the project and the School of Engineering helped with research into building materials.”

Steve had originally hoped the pyramid could be built somewhere in Britain but it was an organisation in Malaysia, Matrix Global Schools, that persuaded Steve that it should host the Earth Pyramid Project.

Located in Sendayan, south of Kuala Lumpur, the project will be more than just a pyramid and huge time capsule, it will also be an education centre.

The pyramid itself will house time capsules in four different forms. They will be:

  • The countries, overseas territories and indigenous peoples chamber which will capture a snapshot of life from every corner of the world.
  • The Children’s Chamber will give every child in the world a chance to record their thoughts for future generations on a small postcard that will survive for 1,000 years. Children from around the world will then get to vote on local initiatives they want the Earth Pyramid Project to support.
  • The Founders Chamber gives some of the wealthiest philanthropists from across the world the opportunity to store details of their lives and achievements in their own half metre, hand-carved stone cube. The first of these cubes have been carved by York stonemason Simon Tyson. There will be 1,000 of these capsules, which will fund the cost of building the pyramid.
  • The Digital Preservation Chamber (DPC) will hold videos, photographs and text in individual Virtual Time Capsules (VTC) documenting the lives of people in specially designed disks that will last for 1,000 years. There will potentially be space for one billion VTCs, raising $billions to fund the pyramid for 1,000 years, while also generating huge revenue for peace and environmental charities and projects across the world.

Steve said: “People who buy a capsule will be investing in the future for our children and also giving them the opportunity to decide where they feel these funds should be spent. The Earth Pyramid Project is about giving back to help future generations.”

He added that there were many other potential revenue streams, including sponsorship, advertising, tourism and merchandise.

Of the VTC technology, Steve said: “The technology currently exists to achieve all this but we also intend to future proof the digital preservation side of the venture by allowing for a preservation upgrade as the technology becomes available.

“Hitachi is currently developing a technology whereby vast amounts of information can be stored on small glass blocks.”

The Digital Preservation Chamber was the idea of Steve’s friend, Paralympic Games cycling triple gold medallist David Stone MBE.

Early last year the first stones were chosen and quarried from the Mone Brothers Quarry near Leeds and one near Tadcaster, North Yorkshire.

International engineering firm Arup whose iconic structures include the Sydney Opera House and the Bird’s Nest stadium in Beijing has been working on the project for five years, offering its expertise in the designing, planning and building of the pyramid.

Mark Steele, Associate Director of Arup, said: “Nobody has ever tried to do anything like this before, but we have done projects that have similar facets to them and worked on historical buildings so we are bringing the expert construction knowledge that will make sure the building lasts for 1,000 years.

“We have material specialists and we will use low carbon alternates to concrete, including using waste products from the steel industry.”

The logistics of building the pyramid are made somewhat more complicated by the fact that the public will be doing the work, using similar techniques and tools to what are thought to have been utilized to build the pyramids in Egypt.

French architect Jean Pierre Houdin, who is internationally renowned for his new theories on construction techniques used by Egyptians to build the Great Pyramid at Giza 4,500 years ago, has also offered his expertise to the project. His theories that the pyramid was built from the inside to the outside will be put to the test in part of the building of the Earth Pyramid.

Mr Houdin said: “I'm very supportive of the Earth Pyramid Project. I would be very pleased if my work could help with the project.”

Steve added: “It’s still a mystery how the pyramids were built – how they moved tonnes of stone to build these huge structures!”

The building of the pyramid is expected to take four to five years, with work expected to start in the next two to three years.

Steve said: “The actual building of the pyramid will be the start of its aim of being a global community project – members of the public will come from across the world to help carve and lay the stones, all using traditional tools and methods.

“By bringing people together it will enable us to discuss environmental concerns across the world. It’ll be like a UN construction site!”

Jeremy Gilly, of the action group Peace One Day, is also involved in the project.

He said: “The Earth Pyramid is an amazing project. It is inspiring people and giving them an opportunity to voice their thoughts on peace and the environment, and that can only be a good thing.”

Spreading the word about the Earth Pyramid Project is an ongoing priority for Steve, who is pictured below on the far left at the Houses of Parliament after presenting his vision to the House of Lords.

Earth Pyramid Steve Ward House of Lords

There will be announcement about building timeframes of the Earth Pyramid Project on the International Day of Peace on September 21.

For more information, visit the Earth Pyramid Project website.

Bradford School of Management links up with prestigious French university to offer joint PhD

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A professor of Human Resource Management and Organisation Studies has praised the link up of the University of Bradford with a prestigious French higher education institution.

Professor Nelarine Cornelius, who lectures at Bradford School of Management, has help forged links with Paris West University Nanterre La Défense so that PhD students can get a jointly awarded doctorate.

Prof Cornelius, pictured, said: “The University is moving towards having jointly awarded PhDs from two institutions. It’s something higher quality universities are doing.

“As a well-regarded management school it can help us to develop strong links with other good universities, such as Paris Nanterre.

“The partnership gives students from each university the opportunity to review each other’s work, which is great preparation for national and international conferences and presentations.

“It’s very beneficial for doctoral students to get this opportunity. It’s very useful for them to develop their presenting skills.”

She added: “It’s all about helping students to develop their doctoral research.”

Prof Cornelius added that one possibility for PhD students is for them to spend one year studying in Bradford and one year in Paris.

The link between the two universities was established after Eric Pezet, of University Nanterre, took up a visiting professorship at Bradford School of Management.

Prof Pezet and Prof Cornelius together founded the international research group, Paris Research in Norms, Management and Law (PRIMAL).

The gives people the skills to be an independent researcher and opportunities to pursue a career in academia, a research institution or management consultancy.

Bradford School of Management lecturer's research aims to find solution to low performing city schools

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Research by an associate lecturer at the University of Bradford School of Management has found that there is a crisis in the city's schools, with a seven per cent shortage in teaching staff.

, who lectures in human resource management, says that Bradford schools are languishing at the bottom of the country’s league tables because of the low morale of teaching staff.

Dr Madine, who is an expert in workplace satisfaction, has been studying the correlation between teaching staff morale and results for nearly four years. Eighteen months ago he was asked by two local teaching unions, the NUT and ATL, to carry out research into Bradford schools. His work then led to Bradford Council asking Dr Madine to produce a report for them outlining how the teaching problem can be solved and rankings can be improved.

He said: “My report aimed to find a solution to attracting the right quality of teaching staff. You don’t just want to get the teaching numbers up, you need to find the right staff.

“My aim was to hit the three-pronged Holy Grail of: stopping experience teachers leaving their posts in Bradford; attract talented teaching staff to Bradford; and finally, increase the Ofsted scores.”

Dr Madine, who did his , found that the primary cause of this unhappiness is due to an unreasonably high workload. He also found that the deficit in teaching staff in the Bradford Metropolitan District Council area is predominantly in the core subjects of Maths, English and Science.

“Bradford is in a vicious circle of being at the bottom of league tables so it is harder to attract the right quality of teaching staff.” he said. “The deficit in teaching staff means the current teachers are having to work longer hours. This leads to workplace dissatisfaction and teachers less likely to be able to enthused pupils.”

Schools in England are spending £1.3billion a year on supply teachers, which works out at an average of £59,000 per school. However, Dr Madine says Bradford Council spends £15million a year on supply teachers, which is higher than the national average at £65,000 for every one of Bradford’s 230 schools.

"Some schools in Bradford are spending as much as £500,000 on supply teachers in one academic year; an astonishing sum, that indicates the depth of the problem in some schools," said Dr Madine.

Bradford Council is also spending £600,000 a year on advertising and agency costs to recruit new teachers.

Dr Madine, who also teaches research methods at Bradford School of Management, said his first step for the trades union research was to create a qualitative survey, which was sent out to all the schools in the district for teachers to answer.

He got feedback from more than 600 teachers before then speaking face to face with over 200 of them and 150 support assistants. He also spoke with 4,000 children about what causes them to be stressed.

“When Bradford Council saw the findings of my report they stood up and took notice,” said Dr Madine.

He has since spoken about his findings to the Council’s Education Scrutiny Committee last November and in February this year.

One of the problems, Dr Madine says, is that older, more experienced teachers, have been leaving Bradford schools and they have been replaced by newly-qualified, with Canada being a popular recruiting ground.

He said: "As seen in a report in the Guardian newspaper, this is a headline grabbing strategy but these Canadian teachers are not only expensive to recruit but they tend to only last a year in Bradford before moving on to somewhere more appealing. A further issue with recruiting NQTs (Newly Qualified Teachers) is that the experience and the knowledge that comes with older teachers isn’t being replaced, which results in schools slipping down the league tables."

“As soon as I started compiling the statistics from my surveys it was clear why teachers in Bradford were leaving – most teachers said the workload was excessive for what they were getting paid. It’s not unknown for teachers to be working the equivalent of 12-hour days. Stress levels are high amongst teachers because of the hours they are working and the excessive load along with the resultant poor work-life balance is high on the list of reasons why teachers said they were leaving the profession.

“When teachers are being worked harder and harder they get tired, and then they lose creativity. That’s when they struggle to keep students engaged, so youngsters play up. Once that happens you lose control. It’s the perfect storm for running schools down.”

He added: “Teachers need to enjoy their jobs to get good results. Job satisfaction is what’s missing here. If their workload is too big they can’t enjoy their jobs, so they can’t bring learning to life and engage pupils.”

One of the questions Dr Madine asked was, ‘Has anything good happened in this school in the last two weeks? Just 15 per cent of respondents answered ‘yes’ to that question.

Dr Madine said teachers have to be happy in their jobs if schools are to improve their results. “Teachers need to feel valued, not just feel as though they’re there to meet targets.”

Dr George Madine will be speaking about his research at a Westminster Education Forum event entitled Raising Pupil Attainment in the North of England and Midlands on November 7 in Manchester.

Bradford School of Management research continues to find Yorkshire's fastest growing companies

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A University of Bradford School of Management PhD student is becoming something of an expert in Yorkshire's fastest growing companies thanks to an annual research project.

Andreas Chronopoulos, who has also previously lectured in Human Resource Management at Bradford School of Management, has been compiling the Yorkshire Fastest 50 list for past five years.

The list is compiled annually in associated with law firm Ward Hadaway to highlight the 50 fastest growing, private companies in the county. The results are published, along with a 12-page supplement, by the Yorkshire Post.

Ward Hadaway also hosts an awards ceremony at Aspire in Leeds to celebrate the achievements.

Andreas has been researching and putting together the Yorkshire Fastest 50 list since 2011.

It was Andreas’s PhD supervisors, Dr Jo McBride and Prof Peter Prowse, who first mentioned the project to him.

“I am a self-funded PhD student so I was trying to find a way of supporting myself.,” said Andreas. “I had sent out letters and emails to lots of companies offering my expertise, but I hadn’t had much success. When Jo mentioned Ward Hadaway were looking for someone to take over their Yorkshire Fastest 50 research I jumped at the chance.”

Andreas uses financial analytic software to work out which companies have grown the fastest over the previous 12 months, with company mergers not counting.

His PhD thesis is titled Working from Home in the Clinical Trials Sector: A Case Study of Clinical Research Associates (CRAs) in the UK, which he hopes to finish before the end of the year.

Andreas currently works for King’s College London at King’s Health Partners Clinical Trials Office.

Bradford School of Management launches new research group aiming to promote social responsibility and sustainable development in business

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A professor at the University of Bradford School of Management has hailed the launch of a new research group a big success.

The Bradford Centre for Business in Society (BCBiS) research group aims to promote social responsibility and sustainable development in businesses, and examine implications for leadership, strategy and change in organisations.

The official launch programme of BCBiS got under way with two seminars and a workshop in February.

The seminar series was opened with a talk by Prof Catherine Cassell, from Leeds University Business School, on the progress of qualitative research within business, management and organizational fields.

Prof Cassell is the founding chair of British Academy of Management's Special Interest group in Research Methodology and co-Editor of Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: an international journal.

Prof. Eric Pezet (pictured), of the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, then gave a seminar entitled Acknowledging and Adapting to Employees Social Expectations.

A doctoral symposium, run jointly by staff and doctoral students from the University of Bradford School of Management and Paris Ouest, with a focus on business and society research, was also one of the BCBiS research centre’s series of launch events.

Last month Prof Geraldine Healy, of Queen Mary University of London, gave a seminar on Gender Representation and the Gender Pay Gap in the Financial Services Sector.

Prof Nelarine Cornelius, co-director of BCBiS, said: “Our launch events so far have been really well attended by staff and students from the School of Managment, as well as from other University departments, including Health and Social Sciences. Colleagues from other nearby universities also attended.”

Prof Cornelius has already secured a trio of high profile academics as guest speakers for the 2016-17 school year.

They are Prof Samantha Warren of Cardiff Business School, Prof Caroline Gattrell of Lancaster University Management School and Prof Miguel Martinez Lucio of Manchester Business School. A full programme will be released in autumn 2016.

Bradford School of Management corporate reputation expert speaks on BBC Radio 4 World at One

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A corporate reputation expert at the University of Bradford School of Management has been speaking on the BBC about the implications for multinational companies that the public is now likely to be given access to how much tax they pay.

Professor of Marketing, Stuart Roper, appeared on BBC Radio 4’s World at One programme today to discuss the news that the European Commission is to force large corporations operating in Europe to disclose profits earned and taxes paid in each of the EU’s 28 member states, as well as fiscal havens.

In the wake of the Panama Papers revelations, large companies trading in Europe, including subsidiaries of non-European businesses, would have to publish how much tax they pay outside the EU, including detailed country-by-country information on their finances in tax havens.

Presenter Martha Kearney asked Prof Roper whether the public being able to see how much (or how little) tax multinationals were paying would have any effect on their behaviour.

Prof Roper said it appeared that the current bad publicity some companies have had over their tax affairs appears not to have caused damage to their brand.

He cited recent examples of global corporations which had been in the media for its tax affairs, such as Google, which this year did a deal with the Treasury to pay a low percentage of tax on its earning.

He said according to the 2016 RepTrak survey the bad publicity had appeared to do Google no harm, with the corporation being ranked third in the world for highest corporate reputation. Apple, which has had similar publicity over its tax payments, is ranked tenth in the world for reputation.

Prof Roper said the view that these stories do damage to a corporate reputation has to be questioned.

However, Prof Roper said that the influence of negative stories about a corporation on the public can be increased the more the stories add up.

“What really matters is momentum,” he said. “If there is one bad news story they (the company) can probably ride it out, but if there were a number of bad news stories simultaneously – I think Tesco is a good example of this. Their reputation was damaged not just by one thing, but a group of stories. There was the horse meat scandal, the black hole in their finances and stories about customer service. It’s when the media attention continues from one reason to another.”

He added: “If it was just about tax I’m not quite sure customers would inconvenience themselves by, for example, dealing with someone else rather than dealing with, say, Amazon.”

You can listen to Prof Roper on BBC Radio 4's World at One on iPlayer. His interview starts at 12 minutes.

Bradford School of Management academic to speak on disabled women entrepreneurs at Birmingham Business School workshop

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A University of Bradford School of Management academic is to speak about disabled women entrepreneurs at a workshop this week.

The Enterprise and Diversity Research Cluster at Birmingham Business School is hosting the Disability and Entrepreneurship workshop on Thursday.

, who lectures in Human Resource Management at Bradford School of Management, along with Nicola Patterson, of Newcastle Business School, will hold a session entitled 'Constructing an intersectional lens to explore the experiences of disabled women entrepreneurs' at the free event.

Director of the Enterpirse and Diversity Research Cluster, Prof Monder Ram, said: "We are holding this workshop to highlight the intersection of two vexed concepts as a place where ideas from disability studies and the business school can meet and interact in a way that has theoretical, as well as practical socio-economic, implications.

"The event will combine ongoing work from established and new scholars in this area, drawing upon a range of empirical and theoretical material. Whilst it will be of particular interest to those with an interest in disability and enterprise, it will also be informative to those with other interests in the business school, and disability studies more broadly."

Programme
11.00-11.30 Registration and refreshments
11.30 Welcome, Tom Coogan
11.30-12.00 Ghosts in the labour market: reasons why business schools should be doing disability research. Debbie Foster (Cardiff Business School)
12.00-12.30 Experiences of people on a scheme to aid disabled entrepreneurs. Tom Coogan (Birmingham Business School)
12.30-13.00 Lunch
13.00-13.30 Constructing an intersectional lens to explore the experiences of disabled women entrepreneurs. Jannine Williams (University of Bradford School of Management) and Nicola Patterson (Newcastle Business School)
13.30-14.00 Faceless business? How disabled entrepreneurs acquire legitimacy. Eva Kasperova (Kingston Business School)
14.00-14.10 Coffee
14.10-15.00 Panel discussion Chair: Monder Ram
15.00 Closing remarks

Booking on the event is advised.

Major conference on brands at School of Management aims to show-off Bradford to international audience

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The University of Bradford School of Management is hosting a major international conference this month.

Academics from across the world will descend on Bradford for the 11th Global Brand Conference on Wednesday, April 27 to Friday, April 29

The theme for this year's conference is Brands that do Good and organiser, Professor of Marketing at the School of Management, Stuart Roper, is also hoping to use the event to help raise the profile of Bradford to the international visitors.

Conference delegates will investigate opportunities for brands to avoid negative publicity, criticism and a sceptical public by demonstrating their wider contribution to society.

250 x 250 The conference is being held in conjunction with the Academy of Marketing’s Special Interest Group (SIG) in Brand, Identity and Corporate Reputation.

Prof Roper, pictured, said: “This is a major conference that brings delegates from five continents, across the world to Bradford. It’s a prestigious event for Bradford School of Management to be hosting.

“Among the topics the conference will address are Branding and Reputation, Contemporary Academic Thoughts on Brand Management, and Corporate Reputation.”

As well as respected academics leading events at the conference, keynote speakers will be global sustainability manager for Unilever, Laura Gherasim, and author of Brands with a Conscience, Nicholas Ind.

‌The Journal of Brand Management is associated with the conference.

Prof Roper says he also wants to use the conference to promote Bradford to the conference delegates from across the world.

At the end of the first day of events there will be a reception with the Lord Mayor of Bradford, Councillor Joanne Dodds, at Cartwright Hall Art Gallery in Lister Park.

The following evening, Thursday, delegates will get to put to the test Bradford’s accolade of five-time consecutive year winner of Curry Capital of Britain when they have dinner at My Lahore restaurant.

On the final day, as the conference draws to a close, there will be a tour of UNESCO World Heritage Site, Saltaire, pictured below.

Prof Roper said: “I want to help alter people’s preconceptions of Bradford and help the Bradford brand. At last year’s Global Brand Conference in Finland I showed people pictures of our Emm Lane campus and they couldn’t believe it was Bradford.

“I want to show people from across the world how important Bradford was in the architecture of the Industrial Revolution, and also show what Bradford has to offer now, such as great food, culture and media.”

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Prof Roper’s research specialisms are branding and corporate reputation. He has developed and published work specifically on two main areas of research - brands and litter and branding's effect on the self-esteem of children.

Prior to entering academic life, Prof Roper spent 10 years as a marketing manager in the telecommunications sector. He has also worked with many diverse organisations, such as major retailers Sainsbury's, Tesco, B&Q, Argos and Homebase; manufacturers such as Chiesi Pharmaceuticals, Rolls Royce, Sonae, B. Braun Medical Ltd; business-to-business service companies like Mansell Construction and Securicor, as well as financial services group Abbey National Financial Services.

His work has also encompassed the not-for-profit sector including the NHS, National Institute for Marketing for Nigeria, the Retail Enterprise Network, Keep Britain Tidy and Keep Australia Beautiful.

Prof Roper has appeared in media in the UK and around the world discussing contemporary issues in branding, marketing and issues of corporate reputation. Examples include BBC TV and Radio, TVNZ, the Sunday Times, the Guardian, Marketing Magazine, and on news related websites around the world.

There will be the opportunity for attendees to stay overnight on campus in one of 42 boutique-style en-suite rooms at .

Book your place on the 11th Global Brand Conference – Brands that do Good.

Bradford School of Management students celebrate securing work placements at prestigious companies

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University of Bradford School of Management undergraduate students are celebrating securing their year work placements.

The first five students to gain their year-long work placement were presented with an Amazon gift voucher by Bradford School of Management career development staff Lorraine Lucas, pictured far left, and Sue Spence, right.

Pictured seated outside Heaton Mount at the School of Management campus are four of the five students who received a gift voucher.

The students, pictured seated from left are, Alla Jevtjukova, who is studying Accounting and Finance BSc; Theodora Negrea who is studying Human Resource Management BSc; Molly Simpson, who is studying on the Marketing BSc course; and Maryia Amrez, who is studying Accounting and Finance BSc.

Alla has secured a place at Bosch, Buckinghamshire; Theodora will be working at Accenture in London; Molly has gained a place at international market research firm TNS Global; and Maryia will be working at Sterling Corporate Finance in Leeds.

The fifth student to get the voucher, not pictured, was Angad Chawla, who is studying on the Accounting and Finance BSc. He has secured a place at international consultancy firm Deloitte, in Leeds.

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Bradford School of Management entrepreneur scoops Royal award for diamond business

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An entrepreneur who studied at the University of Bradford School of Management has received Royal approval from HRH the Duke of York for his business enterprise.

Karan Aswani collected the Duke of York Young Entrepreneur Award from Prince Andrew at an awards ceremony, organised and hosted by the University of Huddersfield.

Karan established his London-based jewellery company in December 2013 after completing an Accounting and Finance BSc at Bradford School of Management. After completing his degree Karan qualified with the Gemological Institute of America (GIA).

His company, Diamonds & Diamonds Ltd supplies loose, polished diamonds and finished jewellery pieces to jewellers in countries across the world, including the UK, Spain, Germany, Italy, Canada, USA, Hong Kong, Australia and the Caribbean.

Karan says customer service is key to his success, and continually strives towards exceeding the expectations of his clients.

Karan said: “Perhaps the most significant moment of achieving this award was being able to reflect over the journey. Every decision and experience faced in the past few years educated me towards building a stronger foundation for the company to grow on.

"I’d like to thank the University of Bradford for the nomination. Meeting HRH Prince Andrew will always be a defining moment in my life."

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The Duke of York Young Entrepreneur Awards were launched in 2013 to celebrate young entrepreneurs and to recognise the achievements of talented students.

Students on unique triple country Master's arrive for final term at Bradford School of Management

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A new cohort of students on a unique Master's programme has been welcomed at the University of Bradford School of Management.

Before arriving in Bradford the group of 35 students on the European and International Business Management MSc (known as the European Management Programme) had previously studied for a term in France at the Audencia Business School, Nantes, and in Spain at the Deusto Business School, Bilbao.

The students must be trilingual before starting the course because it is taught in the language of the host nation – Spanish, French and English. For some students none of these languages are native to them.

Whilst students come predominantly from Spain and France, there are also people on the course from other parts of the world, this year from several Latin American countries (Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador), Belgium, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Canada, Iceland, Andorra, Algeria and China. One student this year comes from Tahiti.

The outstanding course celebrated its 25th anniversary last year and an event was held at the world-famous Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao to mark the occasion.

Director of the European Master's Programme and Senior Lecturer at Bradford School of Management, Jean-Marc Trouille said: “The students are a very dynamic group of positive young people who, according to former Bradford MBA students, really add something to the final taught part of the course, so their arrival is always something to look forward to.”

The programme is a joint award from all three institutions and is officially recognised by the Ministerio de Educación in Spain.

European Management Programme student Joshua Gamble said he is hoping to use the course to get him a career in a European consulting or marketing role.

He said: “I was living and working in Portugal when I heard about the course. It was exactly what I was looking for. I previously studied languages at Sheffield University and I want to get into consultancy or marketing so the course sounded perfect. I don’t know any other course like this.”

Fellow student Adrian Padilla, who is from Ecuador, said: “I was looking for a course that offered the opportunity to move around different countries. It has been a great experience, but still a challenge.”

Irene Gorordo said she chose the course after her sister studied on it last year.

She said: “I did a Law degree so I have come from a different area and the course has offered a really good way to broaden my international business knowledge, and improve my English.”

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MBA students visit Airbus as part of international study trip to Toulouse

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Toulouse was the destination for an international study trip for University of Bradford School of Management MBA students this month.

The visit to the city in south-west France offered students on the Full-time and Accelerated MBA the chance to visit the production facilities at one of the area’s largest employers, Airbus.

The students also attended a networking lunch with Aerospace MBA students at Toulouse Business School, which hosted the trip.

They were also given a presentation on Airbus and how it manages demand and product life cycle.

Also on the itinerary were presentations of the economics of the Midi-Pyrénées region; classes on cross-cultural management; and a presentation on ‘Non Market Strategy’ (lobbying) by an alumnus of the Bradford School of Management, now working at Toulouse Business School.

Students also visited the Château Bellvue La Forêt winery to look at its production facilities; given a walking guided tour of Toulouse; and visited Albi Cathedral and the Toulouse Lautrec Museum.

Dr Craig Johnson, Director of Studies for the programme, said: “The international study trip offers students on the Full-time and Accelerated MBA programmes an opportunity to immerse them into a different culture.

“With seven nationalities represented, the cohort was a diverse group themselves, so the trip offered an opportunity to think about the difference and similarities between various different nationalities.

“Beyond the cultural visits to Fronton and Albi, the highlight of the trip for many was the impressive facilities of Airbus. Bordering four different towns Airbus is a major employer of some 50,000 people in the Toulouse area. The tour of their impressive facilities demonstrated how the A-320 and A-380 were assembled and developed themes on the presentations of the economics of Midi-Pyrénées and Airbus.”

Dr Johnson added: “The international study trip is an integral part of the course fees for the Full-time and Accelerated MBA. In previous years we have been to Krakow in Poland. We are looking at a number of exciting options for next year, though the final destination is still to be determined.”

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Bradford School of Management professor to present high performing work research findings at Curtin University, Malaysia

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An Associate Professor in Human Resource Management University of Bradford School of Management will be travelling to Borneo to present at a major business conference later this month.

Dr Robert Perrett will be making the trip to present at the 33rd Annual Pan-Pacific Business Association Conference, hosted by Curtin University in Sarawak, Malaysia (pictured below).

Dr Perrett will be presenting findings from a research project he has been leading in South Australia.

He said: “My research looks specifically at high performing work system within the South Australian manufacturing sector. A lot can be learned from how some Australian businesses are insulating themselves from direct competition with lower cost Chinese markets.”

Professor Jonathan Winterton, Dean of the Faculty of Business at Curtin Sarawak and conference chair, said: “One of the enduring challenges of management is how to sustain superior performance in comparison to competing enterprises. The ultimate measure of performance is return on human capital as well as other non-financial employee measures that meet the strategic goals of the business.”

Dr Perrett will be presenting in the Special Colloquium on Organizational Performance where he will discuss the people management strategies adopted by a number of Australian businesses and how these meet their advanced manufacturing demands. He is currently expanding his research into the UK conducting a number of large scale workforce surveys across Yorkshire.

“If any Yorkshire businesses want to better understand how their workforce feel and identify, and how this impacts on performance please get in touch with me,” added Dr Perrett.

Dr Perrett has developed a scientific workforce survey on high performance and is offering Yorkshire businesses a free diagnostic report over summer 2016.

To contact Dr Perrett, email r.perrett@bradford.ac.uk

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Bradford School of Management Human Resources MSc students visit one of the country's best rated employers

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Top performing students on this year's Human Resource Management MSc programme got to learn about what makes a great company to work for on a visit to one of the country's best rated employers.

The company, Zenith Intelligent Vehicle Solutions, was ranked the 8th best employer in the UK in 2014 according to the Times top 100 survey and were shortlisted in 2015 for the Yorkshire Post’s best employer awards.

Zenith is one of the UK’s leading independent leasing, vehicle outsourcing and fleet management provider and employs more than 300 people in the Leeds area.

The Human Resource Management MSc students said they gained a lot from their experience. Ruby Takhar, one of the MSc students, said: “To have been given the opportunity to visit Zenith and understand how a successful HR department functions was really useful as it helped me understand how theoretical approaches learnt on my course are applied in practice in the workplace."

Organiser of the visit, Dr Robert Perrett, who is Associate Professor in HRM and Programme Leader at Bradford School of Management, said: "These students have really worked hard this year, embraced the course and been really interactive in classes.

"I thought it would be of great value to them to see how one of Yorkshire top businesses treats their employees."

He added: “Zenith operates one of the most advanced and comprehensive HR systems I have ever seen."

Marisa Jerrison, HR Director at Zenith, highlighted the importance of connecting with the next generation of professionals and graduates.

“At Zenith we pride ourselves on being innovative and adapting to the changing trends of our industry," she said.

"Bringing talent into the business with fresh ideas and the ability to challenge our way of doing things is integral to the future success of Zenith.

"Sessions like the one we held with the MSc HRM students from the University of Bradford School of Management ensure that we are continuing to connect with people of this calibre and are opening our doors to exciting new talent in the future.”

The School of Management's relationship with Zenith was formed after Dr Perret was introduced to the company after they entered last year's Outstanding Employer category of the Yorkshire Post Business in Excellence awards, which Dr Perrett helped judge.

Zenith

Pioneer of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law student learning support service attends graduation at Middle East partner college

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A stalwart of the University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law has returned from a trip to a partner college in the Middle East where he was invited to advise them on setting up an academic learning service.

was asked by the College of Banking and Financial Studies (CBFS) in Oman to offer his expertise in student support.

Dr Sedgley pioneered the at the Faculty of Management and Law.

The service helps students maximise their academic potential, as well as help overseas students adapt quickly to UK academic requirements.

It provides a huge range of services, including various workshops run during term time, one-to-one consultations, as well as printed and online resources to cater for every possible development area.

After discussing the requirements of CBFS, Dr Sedgley provided a report to help implement a successful learning support service.

Dr Sedgley, who is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, said: “I enjoyed my trip to CBFS tremendously – there were several memorable highlights.

“I had a number of very constructive discussions with a wide range of colleagues at CBFS, and I am returning with many ideas to share with faculty colleagues in Bradford.”

While at the CBFS in Oman, Dr Sedgley also represented the University of Bradford at the School’s graduation ceremony and the celebration of its 10 year anniversary of its partnership with Bradford.

CBFS Assistant Dean of Academic Support and Student Affairs, Dr. Yasmeen Shanan Al Balushi thanked Dr Sedgley and Bradford School of Management for its support. She said: “It was our pleasure to have Dr Sedgey with us during CBFS graduation and the celebration of 10 years of the Bradford foundation program at CBFS. It was indeed a proud occasion.”

Guest of honour was Dr Abdullah bin Mohammed Al Sarmi, undersecretary for the Ministry of Higher Education.

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Pictured above: Dr Abdullah bin Mohammad Al Sarmi, undersecretary for the Ministry of Higher Education, second from right, with Dr Martin Sedgley, second from left.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley, front row second from right, at the graduation ceremony at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman, which is a partner college of the University of Bradford School of Management.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley giving a speech at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley being presented with a gift at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman, which is a partner college of the University of Bradford School of Management.

'You are now in the mile high school of management'

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A University of Bradford School of Management academic recently had an interesting experience when he gave a mile high tutorial.

Dr Hugh Lee, who lectures in Organisational Behaviour and Business Ethics, has given tutorials in many places across the world but, to the best of his knowledge, he has never tutored a student who is halfway across the Atlantic, 40,00ft in air.

Dr Lee said: "I had no idea it was to be recorded by Anis or ‘attended’ on a long haul flight but it certainly takes our 'Technology University' claims to new heights!"

It came about when student Anas Ramli, who is based at the University of Bradford School of Management Dubai Knowledge Village campus, was flying between London and Calgary, Canada.

Anas, who is studying on the Executive MBA in Dubai, decided that the fact he was on a long-haul flight should not stop him logging on and checking in for his tutorial with Dr Lee.

He even found time to introduce himself to some of the air crew on camera!

The tutorial was for a Managing People module tutorial conducted via Blackboard Collaborate.

Dr Lee said: "The subject was Management Roles and the debate between Henry Mintzberg’s idea of management as an art and Henri Fayol’s idea that it is much more of a science.

"I came to know Anis well during the three day intensive module in Dubai two weeks before this session. He is a very diligent student and contributed very positively to the sessions and we had lunch together on the middle day in the Dubai Knowledge Village."

As well as offering the Executive MBA at the Dubai Knowledge Village, the School of Management also offers an MSc in International Health Management.

Next seminar in series on gender misrepresentation of women leaders and professionals in the media announced

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The issue of women's clothing at work will be among the topics on the agenda at the next seminar in a series funded by the Economic and Social Research Council on June 15.

, who lectures in Human Resource Management at the University of Bradford School of Management, is part of the research group who secured the funding and organised the three-year seminar series, which focuses on gendered media misrepresentations of women leaders and professionals. The previous seminar in March was held at Bradford School of Management.

Fellow research group member Dr Valerie Stead, of Lancaster University Management School, has carried out research into the experiences of women leaders that illuminates ‘invisible’ rules, where women in the workplace often feel assessed by their appearance rather than their ability.

This was recently highlighted in the media when news of a woman being sent home from work for not wearing high heels hit the headlines. Dr Stead wrote about this in an article in HR Magazine.

The theme of next month’s seminar is Developing Research Capacity for Management and Business Studies with the title “Multi-disciplinary Approaches: Developing Research Priorities and Impact”.

It is being hosted by Lancaster University Department of Leadership and Management’s Academy for Women, Diversity and Leadership at the Charles Carter Building, Lancaster University Management School.

Dr Williams said: “The focus of the next seminar is on developing research priorities and impact. We will introduce participants to different multi-disciplinary approaches, including sharing examples of research and impact, the seminar will explore effective approaches to tackling gendered media misrepresentations of women professionals and leaders and how we might put those into practice to gain maximum impact.”

The seminar series has brought together leading international researchers from multiple disciplines, journalists, lobbyists and those committed to the progress of women professionals and leaders.

In total, there will be nine seminars over three years. They follow the same three themes:

- Gendered media misrepresentations: why do they matter and how do we know?

- Developing research capacity for management and business studies: multidisciplinary methodologies, theories and concepts/analysing media texts and visual methods

- Developing priority research agendas and maximising impact

Dr Williams said: “The media is a powerful player in the promotion or otherwise of gender equality worldwide and media representations of women have great impact on how women are viewed and view themselves.

“However, a continued media focus on women's gender, not competence, ignores women's achievements as leaders and professionals, misrepresenting their ability, contribution and advancement. This innovative seminar series explores, examines and challenges how media shapes and influences the way in which women are constructed as professionals and leaders.”

The speakers at next month’s seminar will be:

Charlotte Valeur
Charlotte Valeur is the Founder and Chair of Board Apprentice Ltd., a company committed to developing diversification on boards through a board apprentice scheme. Charlotte is the Managing Director of GFG Ltd, a Governance Consultancy. She has over 30 years’ experience in the Financial Industry as an Investment Banker in Denmark and UK, has extensive board experience as a Non-Executive Director (NED) and currently holds Chair and NED positions on various boards.

Professor Anita Biressi
Anita Biressi is Professor of Media and Society in the Department of Media, Culture and Language at the University of Roehampton. She is Convenor of the MA Media, Communication and Culture. Her research interests include: documentary and popular factual programming, popular journalism, crime and law and order, class difference in contemporary British culture and gender and political voice.

Professor Rosalind Gill
Professor Rosalind Gill joined City University London in October 2013. With an interdisciplinary background, she has worked across a number of disciplines including Sociology, Gender Studies and Media and Communications with posts at Goldsmiths and King's College London, and the LSE's interdisciplinary Gender Institute. Rosalind is known for her research interests in gender and media, cultural and creative work, and mediated intimacy.

Other members of the research group are Dr Valerie Stead of Lancaster University Management School, Professor Carole Elliott of Durham Business School and Professor Sharon Mavin from Roehampton University.

To book your place at the 15th June ESRC funded Seminar 6, email katrin.scherschel@roehampton.ac.uk

Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies tells her story for 50th anniversary

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In the latest of our 50 Years, 50 Stories films, the Chairman of the 50th Anniversary talks about how her career in the NHS shaped her academic thinking.

Jackie Ford, who is Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at the University of Bradford's School of Management, outlines how working in hospitals taught her the importance of critical thinking.

Prof Ford's research interests include the study of working lives, with a particular interest in exploring critical approaches to leadership, gender and inclusivity, ethics, management and organization studies.

Current research studies include: a critical exploration of storied accounts of managers’ experiences as leaders; aesthetics of leadership; working lives of professional women in late career; gender and inclusivity in organizations and researching talent management from a critical perspective.

To watch the latest film on Prof Ford, see below:

Professor of Organisation Studies' 4* journal paper shoots into top 10 most read list

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A paper written by a respected human resources academic at the University of Bradford School of Management has shot straight into a top ten list of most read articles.

Professor Ann Cunliffe, who specialises in the field of Organisation Studies, has had her recent research work published in the 4* Sage journal (4.14 impact factor), Organizational Research Methods.

The title of the journal article is ‘The Politics of Access in Fieldwork: Immersion, Backstage Dramas, and Deception’.

It went immediately in at number 8 on the most read articles list. Professor Cunliffe also has an article at number 22 on the most read list.

The was co-authored the paper with a colleague of Prof Cunliffe's from Brazil, Rafael Alcadipani of Escola de Administraçâo da Fundaçâo Getulio Vargas, São Paulo.

The abstract of the paper:

Gaining access in fieldwork is crucial to the success of research, and may often be problematic because it involves working in complex social situations. This article examines the intricacies of access, conceptualizing it as a fluid, temporal, and political process that requires sensitivity to social issues and to potential ethical choices faced by both researchers and organization members. Our contribution lies in offering ways in which researchers can reflexively negotiate the challenges of access by (a) underscoring the complex and relational nature of access by conceptualizing three relational perspectives—instrumental, transactional, and relational—proposing the latter as a strategy for developing a diplomatic sensitivity to the politics of access; (b) explicating the political, ethical, and emergent nature of access by framing it as an ongoing process of immersion, backstage dramas, and deception; and (c) offering a number of relational micropractices to help researchers negotiate the complexities of access. We illustrate the challenges of gaining and maintaining access through examples from the literature and from Rafael’s attempts to gain access to carry out fieldwork in a police force.

Conference brings together PhD students to discuss and present research work at Bradford School of Management

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The third annual University of Bradford School of Management PhD Conference held this week saw a wide range of papers presented and two excellent keynote speakers.

The theme for this year's conference was evidence-based management (EBMgt).

The conference allowed PhD students at various stages of their study, the opportunity to submit either a complete paper or a developmental paper, as well as providing a platform for them to present their research and ideas with constructive feedback from academics.

The conference was organised by Bradford PhD students Dominic Chiwenga (pictured below, right) and Kamran Mahroof (pictured below, left). Dominic is a doctoral researcher in food supply chain management and Kamran is doing his PhD in Business Intelligence.

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Throughout the day ten students who are doing their PhDs through Bradford School of Management presented their papers, ranging in topics from service culture in Nigeria to the choice of auditors of family firms in China, and management decision making in the NHS to financial inclusion in the developing world (see full details below).

Later in the afternoon five students each gave a five minute presentation in which they had to give a succinct overview of their research. These presentations were judged by Dr Anna Zueva-Owens, who lectures in Business Ethics at Bradford School of Management, and Dr Martin Sedgley, also of the School of Management.

The students who gave a five minute presentation were Caroline Casey, Olushola Kolawole, Anwaar Alkandari, Rebecca Enouch and Itoro Ikpo.

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The award for best developmental paper went to Nikhil Sapre. The award for best full paper is still being considered. In the five minute presentations, Olushola Kolawole (above) won best presentation style and Anwaar Alkandari (below) won best presentation content.

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Dr Sedgley said: "The PhD Conference is a really important and beneficial event for those who are doing their doctorate. You have to be very independent when doing a PhD and you are sometimes very isolated. You can obviously get regular feedback from your supervisors but this conference is a great opportunity for doctoral students to get group feedback and discuss their ideas with fellow research students, as well as established academics."

The keynote speakers were Professor of Organisational Psychology at the University of Bath School of Management, Rob Briner (pictured below) and Professor of Organisation Studies at Durham University Business School, Mark Learmonth (pictured below).

Dominic said: "The third annual PhD Conference was a major success on many fronts. The highlight of the conference was the presentations by the two keynote guest speakers."

Associate Lecturer in Human Resource Management at Bradford, Julia Morgan praised Prof Briner and Prof Learmonth for their "interesting and insightful talks".

The conference opening address was given by Nelarine Cornelius, who is the Professor of Human Resource Management and Organisation Studies at the University of Bradford School of Management.

Dr Sue Richardson, who lectures in Organisational Behaviour at Bradford School of Management, gave a presentation on qualitative research.

Dr Sedgley added: "The students find the conference really helpful. The organisers, Dominic and Kamran, have done a superb job."

The full list of PhD students and their papers they presented are:

Melissa Dennison
Hanging in the balance: Making a case for autoethnographic research

Joseph Maidugu
Investigating the transfer of service culture from the headquarters of a service firm to its subsidiary in an emerging market like Nigeria

Shenghua Shi
The impact of political connections on the choice of auditors of family firms in China

Daniel Ekong
Using sovereign reputation evidence for improving the practice of risk assessment management for the World Bank loans: Developing a methodology

Chidozie Umeh
National cultures and employee commitment in Nigerian organisations: Exploring conflicts and relationships

Rabab H. A. H. Ebrahim
Dividend policy and systematic liquidity risk

Hasan-Tekin
Impacts of the financial crisis on capital structure decisions of non-financial firms: A comparison of the main market and the Alternative Investment Market

Nikhil Sapre
Determinants of financial inclusion in the developing world

Polly Pasco
Evidence-based management in the absence of professionalization: management decision-making legitimacy in the NHS

Muhibul Haq
Thesis chapter: Knowledge

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Professor Mark Learmonth (above) and Professor Rob Briner (below) speaking at the PhD Conference

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Sustainability in Business takes centre stage at hugely successful International Masters' Summer School

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The second annual International Master's Summer School at the University of Bradford's School of Management has been hailed a huge success after student numbers tripled from last year.

With the theme of Sustainability in Business, the Summer School was created to enhance Masters’ students’ understanding of sustainability challenges faced by businesses and organisations at a global and local level. Students were showed innovative ideas and solutions towards those challenges.

Organised by Director of Studies for MSc Programmes at Bradford School of Management, Dr Mei-Na Liao, the Summer School has grown from 16 students last year to 50 students (the maximum number that the School of Management can currently take) this year.

The 50 students were from 17 nationalities, four continents and four European Business Schools: Bradford University School of Management, Audencia France, Deusto Spain and Kozminski University Poland.

Dr Liao said: “The Summer School was a huge success; all participants enjoyed the intensive week of seminars and activities and learned about sustainability in Business and organisations.

“I want to say a big thank you to everyone who contributed to this exciting week; our students completed the Summer School with great satisfaction and enthusiasm.”

As well as the lectures and seminars, the students were given guided tours of Drax power station (Europe’s largest producer of energy) and a Coca Cola Enterprises plant at Wakefield (Europe’s largest producer of soft drinks). The issue of sustainability was the main focus of these trips. They were also given a guided cultural tour of UNESCO World Heritage Site, Saltaire Village.

The students also took part in an interactive simulation game. At the start of the week they were put into groups and had to make strategic decisions on the running of a sustainable business each day, balancing the economic, wellbeing, social and nature impacts.

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Pictured above are the students on the International Masters' Summer School

At the end of the week each group gave a presentation on what they had learned from the lectures, seminars, trips and game. Members of the winning team who gave the best presentation received prizes.

The winning team (pictured below) comprised Esther Huyer, Pei-Shan Wang, Joseph Ojo, Ione Saenz Ayala and Wiktoria Golebiowska.

Summer School student Zarli Tun, who is from Myanmar and is studying for the MSc Finance and Investment at the University of Bradford School of Management, said: “The International Masters’ Summer School has been really interesting and informative. It’s given me the opportunity to meet new people and learn things in the areas of sustainability and marketing.”

Zarli added: “I really enjoyed the Social Marketing seminar by Dr Mei-Na Liao and the game has been really good too.”

A Facebook group (FoML: International Master’s Summer School) was set up to capture the learning experiences of the students and give them an online forum to discuss their learning and ideas throughout the week.

Dr Liao said: “The tremendous engagement and activities on Facebook is a testimony to the success of the week.

“Students said they feel that they have deepened their understanding of sustainability.

“They also said they valued the experience of working in a truly international team, it gave them the opportunity to share their views on sustainability to someone from different part of the world and seeing it from different perspectives.”

The prizes for the winning team were sponsored by Colin Crawford, who graduated from the School of Management with an MBA in 1998. He is currently Business Finance Manager at Aviva Life.

Colin has donated funds towards improving the student experience at Bradford. These funds have supported a number of initiatives including travel bursaries for distance learning students to attend block modules on the Bradford campus, prizes for business competitions and conferences such as the PHD Annual Conference and IMSS.

The lectures and seminars included:

Sustainable Composite Structures for Whole Life-Cycle Structural Engineering
Prof Dennis Lam, Chairman of Structural Engineering and Director of Bradford Centre for Sustainable Environments at the University of Bradford

Sustainability in International Business
Dr Deirdre McQuillan, Lecturer in Strategy/International Business at Bradford School of Management

Remanufacturing as a Strategic Choice: The Case of Ricoh UK
Prof David Spicer, Dean of Salford Business School

Finding a Sustainable Business Model
Paul Ellis, CEO of Ecology Building Society

CSR and Sustainability
Dr Anna Zueva-Owens, Lecturers in Business Ethics at Bradford School of Management

International Sustainability Policies
Prof Kevin Barber, Professor of Operations Management at Bradford School of Management

Social Marketing – Behaviour Change
Dr Mei-Na Liao, Senior Lecturer in Marketing at Bradford School of Management

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The winning team. Pictured from left are Ione Saenz Ayala, Esther Huyer, Joseph Ojo, Wiktoria Golebiowska and Pei-Shan Wang

Lecturer scoops prestigious award from Academy of Management for PhD thesis previously given to world-leading academics

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A recently-appointment lecturer has begun her career in academia by winning a prestigious award for her PhD, which a number of world-leading academics in their field have previously been recipients of.

Dr Saima Rifet, who only started as a lecturer in Human Resource Management at the University of Bradford School of Management last month, has won the Academy of Management award for Best Dissertation of the Critical Management Studies Division 2016.

She will travel to annual Academy of Management conference in California in August to collect her award.

After completed her undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at the University of Bradford, Dr Rifet started her PhD at the School of Management in 2010.

It was the supervisor of Dr Rifet’s MSc dissertation and PhD thesis, Prof Nancy Harding, who persuaded her to enter the Academy of Management competition.

Dr Rifet said: “Three weeks into my new role I received a very casual email informing me that I had won the award. Words aren’t sufficient to describe the shock that I felt – I had a numb feeling of not knowing how to react.

"My instant reaction was to inform Nancy, whom I feel deserves much more credit than me for supporting me during all the ups and downs of my PhD."

She added: “I can’t thank Nancy enough – she is by far the best thing that happened to my academic career, followed closely by my amazing colleagues that played a significant role in guiding and supporting my development!”

Prof Harding said: “My congratulations to Sam - it's a pleasure and a privilege to work with her.”

Head of the Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour group at Bradford School of Management, Dr Jannine Williams said: “A huge congratulations to Saima on winning this award! It is brilliant news and something to be very proud of.”

Lecturer Dr Simon Kelly said: “This really is an incredible achievement. We’re very lucky to have Sam working with us.”

Dr Rifet graduated with a BSc in Psychology at the School of Social Sciences, following which she studied an MSc in Finance, Accounting and Management at the Faculty of Management and Law.

As part of a placement on her next course, a PGCert in Entrepreneurship and Employability, Dr Rifet spent three months working at the Union at the University of Bradford in a project linked to the new sustainable student village (SSV) built on the city campus.

Dr Rifet then took up a few projects at the University, including within the Ecoversity department, property developers involved with the SSV, and work with the previous Faculty of Management and Law Dean, Sarah Dixon.

In September 2010 Sam started a PhD at the Faculty of Management Law after receiving funding from the Faculty’s Centre for Managerial Excellence run by ProfJackie Ford.

Prof Ford was Dr Rifet's supervisor, alongside Prof Harding in the first couple of years, with sole supervision by Prof Harding in the preceding years.

During her PhD Dr Rifet was involved in Masters and undergraduate teaching, and with marking, in the HR/OB group.

During her PhD study Dr Rifet was also given the opportunity to complete her PGC in Higher Education Practice - something often expected as the next stage after completing a PhD.

During her PhD Dr Rifet also had opportunities to get involved in wider research taking place at the school and in other faculties, which supported her progression into work soon after PhD submission.

Following the completion of her PhD in early 2015, Dr Rifet secured a post at the Faculty of Health as a Research Fellow on the GENOVATE project, funded by the European Commission.

After a year in this post Dr Rifet applied and secured a lecturer position at the Faculty of Management and Law, within the group that she had previously done her PhD.

A Bradford School of Management stalwart who helps students optimise their learning potential has article published in respected journal

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A University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law staff member who helps students maximise their academic learning has had her first journal article published.

Amy Allhouse (Sheng-Hui Hsu), who works with Dr Martin Sedgley at the , had her article published in the International Student Experience Journal this week.

The essay, titled ‘Bridging academic differences between China and the UK’, was a joint effort with her husband, Michael Allhouse, who is the Student Engagement Manager at the University of Bradford Union of Students.

It discusses a faculty-based induction programme for a group of direct entry Chinese students studying undergraduate final year programmes at the University of Bradford (UoB), Faculty of Management and Law (FoML), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention from the students’ perspective.

Known as the ‘Bridge Programme’, it is designed to aid transition and to develop the students’ understanding of UK academic requirements. It has been running for the last four years.

Student feedback was sought through a number of different means: a questionnaire, focus group, students’ further engagement and their academic achievement. In particular, students recognized the benefits of using exemplars to contextualize analytical writing as part of the induction experience.

Amy said: “Our Bridge Programme focuses on easing the transition of the learning mind-set. We focus on developing new learning skills in the Chinese students and making them aware of the challenges in differences in the learning culture, such as writing skills and the need to be more proactive in lectures, seminars, group work and having a wider reading base, because in China learning is much more defined and restrictive.”

The Bridge Programme is not specifically about developing language proficiency because all the students who are enrolled will already have the required IELTS 6 grade.

Amy said: “I’m really pleased we’ve been published in this journal because the readers of it are people who work in learning support and language support.

“What is interesting about the journal is that it also includes students’ perspectives, while it is also peer-reviewed.”

She added: “The Effective Learning Service helps all our students, not just Chinese. The Bridge Programme is just one example of what we do. We are aiming to roll it out to all international students this summer.”

The International Student Experience Journal is a peer-reviewed online publication for those involved in researching, teaching and providing services to international students in Higher Education in the UK and other English speaking countries. The Journal links the everyday concerns of university staff including academics, researchers, EAP practitioners and the students themselves with insights gained from related academic disciplines such as applied linguistics, education, psychology, and sociology.

Amy, who is originally from Taiwan, completed an MBA at Bradford School of Management 10 years ago and started working at the University nearly seven years ago.

City Editor of the Daily Mail praises his time at Bradford School of Management for playing a major part in developing his career

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An award-winning British economics commentator working as a journalist, editor and author has sung the praises of the University of Bradford School of Management and how it helped advance his career.

Alex Brummer, pictured, graduated with an MBA from Bradford School of Management in the late 1970s. He then had a brief career in business before moving into finance and economics journalism. He is currently the City Editor of the Daily Mail.

He has taken part in a film project to celebrate the University of Bradford’s 50th anniversary: 50 Years, 50 Stories.

He said: “My time at the University of Bradford was a really important time in my life. It was an induction into the whole business world.

“I think in some respects my subsequent career was greatly advanced by that insight because I was working alongside some very dynamic young business people.”

Mr Brummer said he also has fond memories of the campus. “I also liked the location, it was slightly pastoral, it was very close to the moors and I used to enjoy going into Bradford itself and having tea in Brown Muff’s, which was a big department store downtown.”

He said his time at Bradford School of Management was hugely beneficial to his career as a financial journalist.

“When I became a financial and an economic journalist the accounting training that I received, the management training that I received and the case history teaching - which is what management schools do: they teach you by looking at business cases – has been extraordinarily helpful, providing me with an analytical background, which has been tremendously useful as a financial journalist,” said Mr Brummer.

Following his MBA at Bradford, Mr Brummer had a brief spell working in business before securing a place on the Guardian newspaper’s graduate trainee scheme when he was still in his early 20s. He remained at the Guardian for 26 years.

He said: “I was the main economics writer at the Guardian during the 1976 sterling crisis when the UK had to go to the IMF; one of only a few Western democracies that has had to do that in recent, modern times.”

Mr Brummer then went to work at the Washington bureau of the Guardian, where he covered the second presidential election of Jimmy Carter, both elections of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Snr. His work in this area earned him the 1989 Overseas Press Club award for the best foreign correspondent in the US.

He returned to London in 1989 to become the Guardian’s foreign editor, which saw him cover the fall of the Berlin Wall and Eastern Europe finally opening up from the heavy hand of the Iron Curtain, a particularly moving time for him.

“It was a very exciting moment; an exhilarating moment, to see democracy flood over Eastern Europe. For me it was particularly poignant because I come from a family which originated in Hungary, near the Czech border. To see these countries come out from the iron glove of Soviet rule was a very exciting moment for me,” said Mr Brummer, who is very involved in the UK Jewish community.

Mr Brummer, whose father came to England as an immigrant just before the Second World War 1939, is very involved in the Anglo-Jewish community.

His father’s parents were killed in Auschwitz. Two of his father’s sisters and niece were taken to Auschwitz in 1944 but remarkably survived the terror of the place and its awful practices.

He said: “It’s a tail of survival and that’s obviously a very important part of my being.”

More recently Mr Brummer led the Daily Mail's coverage on the 2007 run on Northern Rock, the collapse of Lehman Brothers, and the subsequent credit crunch.

Other awards Mr Brummer has received include Financial Journalist of the Year (British Press Awards).

Prestigious Principal Fellow of Higher Education Academy award for professor

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A professor of Human Resource Management and Organisation Studies at the University of Bradford School of Management has been honoured with a prestigious title by a respected higher education body.

Prof Nelarine Cornelius has been made a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

The Principal Fellowship was awarded in part in recognition of her efforts on the doctoral programme at Bradford School of Management, on the Social Sciences doctoral programme at the University of Lagos (Nigeria) and universities in Canada, France and Germany, and training in the areas of community health and community policing in the UK

A formal announcement was made confirming this prestigious award at the University of Bradford’s Learning and Teaching Research Conference this week by the Pro Vice Chancellor for Teaching and Learning, Prof Shirley Congdon.

Higher Education Academy

The Higher Education Academy states that it awards a Principal Fellowship to those who "have a sustained, effective record of strategic impact at institutional, national or international level and be committed to wider strategic leadership in teaching".

Prof Cornelius has recently been co-facilitator for a doctoral workshop on academic writing for PhD students at the University of Paris, Nanterre, for students from across the University of Paris.

The format was based on a successful workshop held at Bradford, hosted by Bradford Centre for Business in Society, run jointly with Prof Eric Pezet (Paris Nanterre) earlier this year.

Prof Cornelius is helping to develop stronger relations between the Univervity of Bradford and the University of Paris.

Academic presents paper at UN PRME conference on pioneering summer school

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The mastermind of a pioneering summer school presented a paper outlining her initiative to members of the UK & Ireland Chapter of the United Nations (UN) Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) this week.

Dr Mei-Na Liao, along with her colleague Dr Kyoko Fukukawa who leads the UK PRME at the University of Bradford School of Management, presented their work on establishing the International Master’s Summer School (IMSS) at the UN PRME conference in Nottingham this week.

Last month the School of Management held its second annual, with the number of participants doubling from its inaugural event in 2015 to 50 students this year from 17 nationalities, across four continents.

The theme of this year’s Summer School was ‘Sustainability in Business’.

And the theme of this year’s UN PRME conference was ‘Collaboration and Capacity Building in Responsible Management Education’ and was hosted jointly by Nottingham Business School and Nottingham University Business School.

Dr Liao, who is a Senior Lecturer in Marketing and Director of Studies for MSc Programmes at Bradford School of Management, said: "The Summer School was a huge success; all participants enjoyed the intensive week of seminars and activities and learned about sustainability in Business and organisations.

"The presentation showcased the International Master's Summer School which focus on building capacity for education for sustainable development (ESD) through collaboration among academics, companies and students. The IMSS aims to convert students into co-producers of ESD through engaging them with real world challenges and practices."

Dr Liao added: "The chairmain of the conference described the International Master's Summer School as ‘an inspiring programme’."

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The UN PRME conference ran parallel with the annual European Business Ethics Network Meeting (EBEN).

A spokesman for the UN PRME said: “Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have provided a focus for the global business agenda with even greater ambition, and an emphasis to address the structural drivers of poverty, inequality and resource scarcity.

“As PRME signatories, our potential to influence business leaders of the future is widely acknowledged.

“As we consider the challenges set forth in SDGs, this may set a new emphasis for our research, teaching, relationships, and the capabilities that we need to enable responsible leaders for tomorrow.”

The spokesman added that the aims of the conference were to stimulate discussion on questions such as:

What are the capabilities and relationships that Higher Education Institutions need to enhance in light of SDGs?

How can we better create meaningful collaborations that engage multiple stakeholders and institutions?

How can we move forward powerfully together in service of the PRME principles?

* Pictured above are Dr Mei-Na Liao, centre, with fellow Bradford School of Management lecturer Dr Kyoko Fukukawa, right, and Head of the UN PRME, Jonas Haertle, at the conference in Nottingham

European business management expert speaks at EU referendum debate

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A European business management expert has spoken out in favour of remaining in the EU at a live debate.

Jean-Marc Trouille, who is the director of the trilingual collaborative Master's in European and International Business Management (EIBM) at the University of Bradford's School of Management, was on the panel at a debate entitled European Union: Remain or Leave.

Hosted by Churches Together in Ilkley, Mr Touille argued for staying in the EU.

Also on the panel at the event at Christchurch on the Grove were Paul Latham (UKIP); Hamish Yewdal (Labour, on behalf on Stronger In) and Howard Scaife (retired businessman).

The event was organised by Hugh Lorimer and attended by 150 people. The panel was chaired by Jonathan Wright.

Mr Touille's speech in full was:

I would like to raise several points in the time allocated to me: on sovereignty, on the importance of the UK for Europe, and finally on what will happen ‘The Day After’, depending on the referendum outcome.

But first I would like to start with a quote:
‘We are inextricably part of Europe. [No one] will ever be able to take us ‘out of Europe’, for Europe is where we are and where we have always been.’

These words were pronounced by one of your most prominent PMs, Margaret Thatcher, on 16 April 1975. This was two years after the UK joined the EC: Britain consulted its population by referendum, as a fully sovereign country, seeking voters’ approval for what was a good deal.

In the 1970s when the UK joined the European Community, it was struggling economically.

Today, after 43 years of belonging to Europe, Britain has a dynamic economy and enjoys nearly full employment,and consults its population again, about the same issue, and again, as a fully sovereign country. The mere fact that this country is able to hold this
referendum is a blatant demonstration of British sovereignty. National sovereignty is not incompatible with belonging to Europe. Any political grouping claiming in its acronym that the UK would not be an ‘independent’ country is talking nonsense. The UK expresses its
sovereignty in many ways: through its international connections, through its defence, as well as within Europe, where it is in a position to encourage or to block joint decisions.

Now I’d like to move to my second point: what the UK means for Europe.

Some argue that there is incompatibility between the UK and the EU.

I would argue that there is complementarity between the UK and the EU.

And that each one needs the other.

Debates have focused too narrowly on benefits, from the UK’s point of view, of remaining or leaving. But there is far more at stake in the referendum. What is at stake is the Europe of tomorrow. What is at stake, is peace, democracy, and our common values. 46 million British voters will take a decision that will affect not only their country, but more than 500m Europeans.

The British decision will occur at the worst possible time, in a context of rapid global geopolitical and technological change, affected by increased economic and financial uncertainty, rising social inequalities, an erosion of middle classes in developed economies, when we are confronted with the need to improve international cooperations in crucial areas such as currency stability, trade relations between blocs, fiscal rules, climate change, transition towards non-fossil energy sources, finance, migrations, the relative decline of Western economies, the shift of economic power towards the Asia-Pacific area. This is a unique combination of substantial challenges.

If you add to this mix the rise of anti-European nationalists, subsidised by Russia’s President Putin, and an arc of instability on Europe’s Eastern and Southern borders, stretching from Murmansk to Morocco… We are dancing on a vulcano. We are wasting time with issues of
the past. The world out there is changing rapidly and is not waiting for us.

In case of a Brexit, the UK’s continental partners would be considerably weakened. The next referendum would be on a Frexit, in France. It would be devastating.

Britain has brought a lot to the European Union not just by being a net contributor to the modest EU budget. Britain has been a force for extending the Single Market, and for striking free trade agreements between the EU and other regions of the world. Britain encouraged the push for enlargement to the East and contributed to the democratic transition of these countries after the demise of Soviet communism. The EU has been a springboard for the UK to promote important values which are as much British as European parliamentary democracy; the rule of law; open markets. (Some of my fellow country citizens would even argue that the EU has become ‘too British’…’, that ‘too much English is spoken in Brussels!’) As Barack Obama put it: ‘The European Union does not moderate British
influence – it magnifies it.’ In other words the UK has more impact and sovereignty as one of the three most important member states than it would on its own.

An EU without Britain would be likely to drift in a more protectionist direction. It would be a much smaller player in global affairs. It would lose one of the two countries that count in terms of defence policy. It would lose a positive force for liberalism. There is a serious risk that the European motto United in Diversity becomes Disunited in Adversity.
Is this what we want at Britain’s doorstep?
A fragmented mosaic of little nation-states which could so easily be bullied by Russia?
Instead of having the EU as a soft power using its economic clout to put sanctions on Russia for aggressing Ukraine?
In the economic domain we have what Mario Monti calls a two-belief Europe: a group of European countries geared towards the market; and another group geared towards the consolidation of the euro area. Those believing in the market; and those believing in currency
integration. Market, money. This is not incompatible: the volume of everyday transactions in euro at the City is higher than in any other international financial centre. I would daresay that the UK has the euro not as a single, but as a common currency, that de facto the euro is the second currency of the UK. This shows the extent to which we are interdependent. The challenge is to bring closer together those who believe in the market and those who believe in the currency project.
The European project, despite its shortcomings, remains the most advanced example of an economic community of countries. And it is regarded as a model in many parts of the world involved themselves in a process of regional integration. It is also envied all around the Globe by people striving for peace and democracy. Admittedly it is a ‘work in progress’ with many imperfections, but this is the best shelter that Europeans have, at a time when there is a multiplication of external and internal threats.

Who would have grounds to rejoice if, the Day After the referendum, the UK opted for a Brexit?
ï‚· A viscerally anti-European media mogul.
ï‚· A few sorcerers’ apprentices gambling on their country’s future to gain a personal political advantage.
ï‚· Unscrupulous populists.
ï‚· And Russia’s Putin, who subsidises extremist parties across Europe to exacerbate its divisions.

If, however, the UK opted to remain a member of the European Union, this choice would send an unequivocal message to all the populists and new extreme-right parties across Europe, from France to Poland, from Germany to Sweden, from Hungary to the Netherlands, from Austria to Belgium: that despite disappointment about the way the Union works, and despite the UK’s relentlessly Europhobic press, even in the most Eurosceptic member state of the Union, there is no majority to abandon the acquis of the last six decades, which has become a matter of course for two generations.

My last word is that European integration is far from perfect, but it has been the indispensable cement between a huge diversity of nations and cultures which have been able to live in peace for six decades.

If the gap between Europe and its citizens continues to be exacerbated by populists whose ultimate aim is the disintegration of Europe, our democracies will be threatened in their core.

We take it for granted since 1945 that the ‘Never again’ of post-War times will always apply to Europe, that there will never be a war again in Europe. If the EU was disappearing tomorrow, what certainty would we have that a war between Europeans, between France and Germany, would still be unthinkable? Who would have imagined in the former Yugoslavian Federation of 1987-88, that its populations would endure ten years of civil wars, massacres and dreadful atrocities, on European soil, for absolutely nothing?

Let us not play with fire. We are in the same boot: let us not saw the boot into two!

Trailblazer in field of organisation and management theory leaves impressive legacy

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Tributes have been paid to David Hickson, a world-renowned University of Bradford professor, who died last week. Here his old friend and colleague Bob Hinings celebrates his life in this moving obituary.

David J. Hickson 1931-2016

David Hickson died on Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016. That statement boldly puts a full stop at the end of a well-lived life, a life that made a difference to family and friends and to the worldwide academic community of scholars of organizations. David made a significant difference to our field in three important, substantive, ways: through his own research; through his involvement in the founding and early years of the European Group of Organisational Studies (EGOS); and through his role in Organization Studies. These contributions were recognized by him being the first ever Honorary Member of EGOS in 1998 and by receiving the Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award from the Organization and Management Theory Division of the Academy of Management in 2013. And yet, David arrived in academe by an unusual route. After a time as Assistant Secretary of the Bristol Stock Exchange, he had gone to the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology to pursue his ambition of becoming a personnel manager. However, Reg Revans spotted his potential as a researcher and he went on to do a Master's degree, studying restriction of output in a machine shop. It was from there that he was recruited by the new head of the Department of Industrial Administration at Birmingham College of Advanced Technology (later the University of Aston), Tom Lupton, and his career as an academic researcher took off.

In terms of the research that he carried out over a period of four decades, his contributions are through the Aston group, the strategic contingencies theory of power and strategic organizational decision-making. David was a leading member of the Aston group, central to the development of those concepts and findings on organization structure and context that have remained important to our understanding of organizations to this day. In particular, the work he led on operations technology and organization structure helped formulate the terms of that debate. The role of technology in organizational design still features as an important set of ideas about organizations. During his time with the Aston programme, two qualities began to be apparent in David. One was his keen sense of the relationship between theory and data. Yes, he wished to spend time sorting out concepts, but equally, it was important to him to collect and analyse data. Another, was his tremendous attention to detail; no one could get away with shoddy work in David's presence. Nothing was to be missed, no stone to be left unturned. These qualities remained with him all of his life and have been important to the mark he has made on our field.

But during his time at Aston he was able to appreciate the role of theory more and more and when he was invited to spend time at the University of Alberta from 1968-70, the project he led there bore all the hallmarks of his approach to research. What became known as the strategic contingencies theory of power showed his commitment to theory, his concern with data, and the rigour and thoroughness of his approach to research. The original paper of that research has been highly influential and the ideas were an important grounding for resource dependence theory. It also inspired a continuing theoretical and empirical discussion of power. These ideas still have to be dealt with in any discussion of power in organizations. Indeed, the latest citation of this work is in the April 2016 issue of the Academy of Management Review. 40 years after the work was done, it continues to help shape debate on the nature of power in organizations. Thus, David was important in establishing the conversation about power in organizations.

From this work came his invitation to apply for a professorship at the University of Bradford, where, from 1970 on, he was to spend the rest of his academic life. It was also from the work that he had initiated at Alberta that his lifelong interest in strategic decision making became crystallised. At Bradford he led research teams, worked with Phd students and developed concepts and theories on how decisions are made by senior managers. One of the outcomes of this research was the book Top Decisions that remains, a path-breaking, benchmark study. During this time, David dealt with issues of the production of strategic decisions, the shape of the decision making process, the implementation of those decisions, and the nature of organizational processes within which decision making is embedded. David Hickson's name is synonymous with the study of strategic, macro, organizational decision making.

So, from an academic research perspective, David's contribution was much more than most of us can hope to achieve. He was centrally involved in three major studies, which have become part of the accepted canon of literature on organizations, namely, the Aston studies, the strategic contengencies theory of power, and strategic decision making. Surely this was more than enough for any one person. But no, David made a massive contribution to our professional community through the European Group for Organizational Studies, and our journal, Organization Studies.

David was one of a small group of people who made EGOS a reality. Soon after arriving back in Britain after his two-year sojourn in Canada, David began to explore the possibility of a European grouping of organizational researchers. While in North America he had seen the influence of bodies such as the American Sociological Association and the Academy of Management, and, as a committed European (unlike so many British of the 1970s and now this decade), he also saw the possibilities on a European scale. So, a small group of people, including David, launched the European Group for Organization Studies, with its first Colloquium in Breaux-sans-Nappe in 1975. EGOS has since played a major role in developing organization theory initially in Europe, and latterly as an international forum that increasingly draws together European, North American and Asian scholars. As the links between North America, Europe and Asia have increased in strength, we can easily take for granted the vibrancy of European organization theory. But without the trailblazing work of David Hickson, through EGOS (and Organization Studies), those links that we now accept as being part of the globalization of organization theory would not be so strong. David’s important contribution enabled new ideas to circulate and new conversations to take place.

David's experience at Aston and in Alberta had demonstrated the influence and importance of Administrative Science Quarterly, but he was interested in the possibility of a journal with a non-North American focus come into prominence, although he had grave doubts about whether it was really a possibility. The birth of Organization Studies and his doubts about the whole thing was chronicled by David in an 'Inside Story' in O.S. with its beginnings in a bedroom in Speyer in 1977 (Inside Story: the Bedroom Scene, Organization Studies 1: 87-90). Suffice it to say that David was an important midwife in the birth of the journal in 1980 and then served for 11 years as its Editor-in-Chief. It was in this role that David ensured that not only did O.S. get off the ground, but that it became the leading European-based journal for organizational analysis. As an editor, he was tireless in searching out papers and authors, encouraging submissions, giving critical but positive feedback, and encouraging all things associated with the journal. Very few of us have any idea of what it takes, as an Editor, to launch a journal and build it into a leading journal, and when one thinks of this being done in a multi-cultural environment, across nation states and languages, then the challenge is enormous. We need to remember that David did this while occupying a chair at Bradford and leading a groundbreaking series of research studies on strategic decision making. As editor for the first 11 years, he was central in developing that distinctive voice of OS and ensuring that a variety of alternative ways of thinking about organizations were established.

At this time of remembering David Hickson’s life I would like to add a more personal note. He was not only my colleague but my friend and I will miss him. We worked together very intensively for 12 years and then continued to discuss ideas, research, EGOS, OS over the succeeding 35 years. All the time David was very willing to give of himself. He was always committed to working with others. Right from the days of Aston, David worked in teams for research and professional purposes. In doing that, he has contributed immeasurably to the life of colleagues and they have contributed in the same way to his life. He certainly contributed to my life.

I would also like to remember David’s family, which was very important to him, as they go through a time of grieving but also, I know, a time of really good reminiscences. I think of his wife, Marjorie, and the difficulties that she has surmounted with incredible strength and optimism. She has been an extremely important part of David's life and his success as an academic. His children, Adrian and Luci, and their spouses together with his five grandchildren were important in providing a space away from academia, in which other interests and activities could be indulged. I know that his grandchildren will miss ‘Bompa’. I wish all of his family well as they move into this different phase of their lives.

Thank you for your life and your contribution, David.

Bob Hinings

School of Management Class of 2016 celebrates their graduation

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University of Bradford School of Management students have been celebrating their degree success as they graduated this week.

After receiving their certificates from University Vice Chancellor Brian Cantor at the official ceremony at the Great Hall in the Richmond Building at City Campus on Tuesday the graduates attended a reception at the Students Union.

At the reception one outstanding student, Zhifei Pan (below) who was awarded a First Class Honours degree in Accounting and Finance was presented with an award by Colin Whitehead of chartered accountants Naylor Wintersgill for gaining the best results in Level 3 accounting modules.

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Pictured above: Zhifei Pan receives her award from Colin Whitehead of Naylor Wintersgill


Colin said: "Naylor Wintersgill is absolutely delighted to have presented Zhifei with the award for best performance in her final year of the Accountancy and Finance degree.

"Here at Naylor Wintersgill we know the importance of supporting and encouraging our colleagues in their technical and professional development and it very promising for the future of the accounting profession to see such hard work, dedication and commitment from Zhifei being recognised by this award. We wish Zhifei every success for the future.”

Human Resource Management student Liliya Georgieva was awarded the Hannah Collins Book Prize for the best result in Psychology at Work and The Firm and the Strategic Importance of Human Resource Management.

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Pictured above: Human Resource Management BSc graduate Liliya Georgieva being presented her award by Director of Studies of Undergraduate Programmes Margaret Allipoor, centre, and Liliya's proud mother

In other years, Arshad Farooq won the Baker Tilly Prize for the best second year student on the Accounting and Finance BSc.

The West Yorkshire Society of Chartered Accountants (WYSCA) Prize for best first year student on the Accounting and Finance course went to Nabeel Rathoer.

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Pictured above: Bethany Shaw celebrates graduating in Business and Management BSc

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Pictured above: Steven Zurheide celebrates graduating in International Business Management and securing at graduate job with Google

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Pictured above: Business and Management BSc student Benjamin Roberts celebrates his graduation‌

School of Management extends links with Delhi's Indian Institute of Foreign Trade

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The Vice-Chancellor of a prestigious Indian university was a special guest at the University of Bradford School of Management this week.

Dr Surajit Mitra, who is Director and VC of the Indian Institute of Foreign Trade (IIFT) in Delhi, was given a guided tour of the picturesque Faculty of Management and Law campus on Emm Lane before having a meeting with a number of senior staff members on Tuesday.

The group then had lunch on campus at Heaton Mount before Dr Mitra met with the University of Bradford Vice-Chancellor, Brian Cantor, at City Campus.

There Dr Mitra signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which is a formal agreement that there will be a student exchange programme between the two institutions.

An exchange agreement is being developed which will involve Bradford hosting IIFT Master’s students for taught modules and IIFT hosting Bradford PhD and Master’s students as part of their dissertation work.

The visit by Dr Mitra follows a visit to IIFT by former Bradford School of Management Dean Jon Reast and Senior Lecturer in Economics Dr Abhijit Sharma in November 2014.

The following day (Wednesday), Dr Mitra met with Prof Nancy Harding, who is Professor of Organisation Theory at the School of Management, as well as Director of the University’s Centre of Research in Organisations and Work (CROW).

Prof Harding and Dr Mitra explored the possibility of joint research projects between the two schools.

“Dr Mitra is particularly keen on developing insights about leadership in Indian companies,” said Prof Harding.

“The School of Management's Critical Leadership Centre, under the guidance of Prof Jackie Ford, resists the one-size-fits-all school of leadership studies, which presumes that models originating in the US will fit every country and culture.”

She added: “We look forward to working with Dr Mitra and his colleagues to develop understanding of what sort of leadership works best in Indian corporations, and what our two countries can learn from each other.”

Director of the University of Bradford’s International Office, Dr William Mitchell added: “Collaboration with IIFT will enable Bradford researchers access to data and examples leading to joint publications and publications and projects.”


About IIFT

The Indian Institute of Foreign Trade (IIFT) was set up in 1963 by the Government of India as an autonomous organisation to help professionalise the country's foreign trade management and increase exports by developing human resources, analysing and disseminating data and conducting research. The Institute visualises its future role as:

• A catalyst for new ideas, concepts and skills for the internationalisation of the Indian economy.

• The primary provider of training and research-based consultancy in the areas of international business, both for the corporate sector, Government and the students community.

• An institution with proven capability to continuously upgrade its knowledge base with a view to servicing the requirements of the Government, trade and industry through both sponsored and non-sponsored research and consultancy assignments.

The Institute's portfolio of long-term programmes is diverse, catering to the requirements of aspiring international business executives and mid-career professionals alike. These are:

• Two-year MBA (International Business), New Delhi, Kolkata, and Dar-es-Salaam

• Three-year MBA (International Business) (Part-Time), New Delhi and Kolkata

• Executive Masters in International Business, New Delhi

• Certificate Programme in Export Management, New Delhi

Over the last 50 years, from 1963 when it was set up as a Centre of Excellence in International Trade and Business till 2012, IIFT has evolved as a top business school and research institution in the country. With robust infrastructure, strong faculty and dedication to excellence, IIFT has emerged as a National Institute for pedagogy and advocacy.

With the help of the Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India, IIFT has established a WTO Centre which is the sole repository for WTO Secretariat.

The student community of IIFT has been vibrant and active. They have won laurels in various national and international fora from time to time. They have brought glamour and recognition to IIFT. Thus, IIFT is not only a leading business school in India, but also a Centre of Excellence in international trade and business besides being a Research Hub and a Think Tank Institution for Government and Industry.

Awards 'great incentive' for Accounting and Finance prize winners

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Excellent academic performance by two Accounting and Finance students has been recognised by leading accountants.

Best performing first year student Nabeel Rathoer won the West Yorkshire Society of Chartered Accountants (WYSCA) Prize, while Farooq Arshad won the second year prize, sponsored by accounting firm RSM.

Programme leader Dr Helena Pinto said: "The prizes demonstrate how highly accounting firms rate our Accounting and Finance degree and our students."

Accounting and Finance prize ceremony.

The students were the guests of honour at a celebratory lunch, along with , interim Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law, Tim Parr, representing WYSCA and RSM, , and , the Head of the Accounting, Finance and Economics group at the School of Management.

'Great honour'

Farooq said: "The prize for the Best Performer in Accounting and Finance Stage 2 was a great achievement for me as I had won it before as well in Stage 1.

"The award is a great incentive and motivates me to study hard and achieve even better grades at the end of my final BSc degree.

"I hope more students are encouraged through this award every year and perform excellently."

Nabeel said: "It was a great honour to receive the prize.

"The appreciation and recognition has boosted my morale and made those long difficult periods worthwhile.

"To know my dedication allowed me to receive such an award is amazing. I wouldn't have been able to achieve this without my peers, so thank you to them.

"Hopefully, the success will follow for many years and more prizes will have my name on it."

University of Bradford receives £50k from Emerald Foundation

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The University of Bradford has received a donation of £50k from the Emerald Foundation to fund full fee MSc scholarships.

The generous donation has allowed five scholarships to be offered to high-achieving graduates, providing support and encouragement to progress into postgraduate study at the School of Management.

The Emerald Foundation is the charitable arm of Emerald Group Publishing Limited (EGPL), a scholarly publisher of academic journals and books which manages a portfolio of more than 290 journals and over 2650 books and book series volumes.

The Emerald Foundation budgets a significant sum annually for the purpose of supporting charities in the fields of the performing arts and sport, particularly for young persons and animal welfare, within West Yorkshire.

Chairman of the Emerald Foundation, Dr Keith Howard, believes the highest rewards are found when people are encouraged to unlock their intrinsic ability, saying: “It’s all about ‘intellectual return”.

Keith has a long history with the University of Bradford. For five years, he directed the largest and most successful doctoral programme in Western Europe, completing numerous publications in the field of research and management science while at Bradford: “As the owner of Emerald Group Publishing Limited, I realised that the Company and the University would both be celebrating their 50th anniversary in the same year, and so felt this was the perfect opportunity to help others achieve their goals; and I was therefore was inspired to make the £50k donation.”

All five scholarship students are now on their way to brighter careers, with their postgraduate study well underway. Aisha Hussain says her MSc in Finance and Investment is giving her insight into the future of finance and improving her career prospects: “If you look at it, everywhere has a finance department, from the smallest to the largest of companies.”

Michela Takyie is now on her way to becoming a Pharmaceutical Manager after she completes her MSc in International Business and Management. Milan Patel is enjoying developing a more refined knowledge of international marketing principles with an MSc in International Marketing.

Yusuf Mohammad Ali, MSc in International Business and Management, explained how the scholarship has impacted him: “Being awarded the scholarship has accelerated my career path to becoming a social economist – I can see how technology has impacted on communities and future growth trends.”

Elena Kremasta ,MSc in Strategic Marketing, said: “Having previously studied Psychology, I have an interest in human behaviour and, naturally, when combined with a passion for marketing, this translates to an interest in consumer behaviour. This was my main drive, to pursue a Masters in Strategic Marketing at the School of Management. The Emerald Scholarship has provided me with a platform to do this. I will now have the education and foundation to pursue my aspirations, and supports my ambition of acquiring a PhD within Behavioural Economics.”

Emerald Publishing’s Head of HR, Katy Snell, completed an MBA sponsored by Emerald in 2009: “It was Keith’s long relationship with the University of Bradford which encouraged me to undertake the MBA, which has helped me develop a deeper and more business wide knowledge.”

Picture shows Chairman of the Emerald Foundation, Dr Keith Howard, at the University meeting students who have been awarded scholarships.

£1m funding award for REBUILD circular economy project

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The School of Management has been awarded £1 million to support REBUILD, an ambitious project assessing how high value construction materials can be reused in new developments based on the principles of the circular economy.

Read the full story on the .

Professor Zahir Irani appointed Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law

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Professor Zahir Irani has taken up his post as the Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law at the University of Bradford.

Professor Irani brings a wealth of experience to the role, and has a clear vision for the Faculty. He said: “The Higher Education landscape is rapidly changing, with increased competition, changing student demands and new Government policy all adding to the complexity of working and managing Universities. I think being distinctive is part of the solution and integral to my ambition for the Faculty of Management and Law; knowing what makes you unique and where you can add value throughout the student journey and exciting for our students. It is here, with my management team and staff, that I will be developing a bold new vision for the faculty that brings together research, learning and knowledge transfer”.

Professor Irani held several senior management positions at Brunel University London, the most recent of which being the Dean of College (Business, Arts and Social Sciences - CBASS) which he setup following an organisational restructuring from eight Schools into three Colleges. Prior to this role, he was seconded full-time to Whitehall, where he was a Senior Policy Advisor at the Cabinet Office during part of the coalition Government. He is however most proud of being Head of the Brunel Business School, where in 2013 it was awarded the Times Higher Education Business School of the Year under his leadership.

He completed a BEng (Hons) at Salford University before then accepting a research position in industry where he finished his Master’s degree by research. He has a PhD in the area of investment evaluation and undertook his leadership development at the Harvard Business School. He has an extensive list of 3 and 4 star publications in the area of information systems, Project Management and eGovernment, and significant grant income from national and international funding councils.

He said: “I am very excited about leading a triple accredited School of Management and in supporting a developing School of Law. The faculty has an excellent heritage and I look forward to working with colleagues in preparation for the challenges we will face around the REF, TEF and internationalisation.”

University of Bradford School of Law launches free legal advice clinic

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A free weekly legal advice clinic has been launched by the University of Bradford School of Law.

Working in partnership with the Bradford and Airedale Citizens Advice Bureau and Law Centre, the Law Clinic offers comprehensive legal advice to those who might otherwise be unable to access justice.

The newly-formed clinic is supervised by University law lecturer and barrister Ian Miller.

Working under his close supervision, final year law students of the University of Bradford will be providing written legal advice to members of the general public on a whole range of legal matters from contractual disputes to family law issues.

Clinic director Ian Miller, who is a practising barrister at Broadway House Chambers, said: “The advice offered by the students will involve informing clients of their legal position and whether they might go about issuing proceedings and, if so, how. If appropriate, the students will write a letter for their client to send to the other party.

“As well as providing a valuable service to the community, the work of the clinic is an integral part of the educational development of the students involved in the project.

“The students who have enrolled to work in the clinic are some of our brightest and most dedicated students.

“They are excited at the prospect of using the knowledge and skills that they have built up over the last two years of their study to help members of their local community.”

He added: “I am excited at the opportunity of showcasing some of our best students whilst helping them to hone their skills and prepare them for a world beyond education.”

Areas of law the students have been dealing with include debt, neighbour disputes, divorce and financial disputes, wills and family cases.

Law student Sannah Khatoon said the experience she is gaining by working in the clinic is invaluable.

“It has been a really positive experience,” she said. “It’s different to anything I’ve had the opportunity to do before and very beneficial to my studies."

&ldquldquo;A topic that I have not yet studied came up – debt recovery – so it gave me the opportunity to research that area. I have learned about the Limitation Act 1980 and how old debts are not always recoverable.”

She added: “I now look forward to using my new knowledge to send the client written advice on the matter.”

Sannah’s fellow student, Robin Bennett said dealing with real-life cases has been an excellent addition to his studies. “Being involved in the Law Clinic is really interesting,” he said. “It builds on the skills we have learned studying at the School of Law.

“Last week we had a divorce case involving the division of assets. Last semester I undertook a Family Law module and so I felt very confident in giving advice.

“This morning we had a case regarding a will. A lady wanted advice regarding her husband’s estate because he hadn’t left a will. We are now going to do some research on it and discuss it with some qualified solicitors to be able to give the best advice.”

The Law Clinic’s operations will not simply be limited to advising the public as the lecturers and students of the Law School will be engaging in research into the effects in the city of the reductions in the availability of legal aid and other cuts in funding which are reducing access to justice.

The research will look at how the university can collaborate with providers of legal advice from both the private and charitable sectors to try a fill the void left by cuts in funding.

Robin Lister, senior lecturer at Bradford Law School, said: “The city is fortunate to have a number of agencies who can offer free legal advice to members of the public and many law firms also offer free or ‘pro-bono’ legal advice in certain cases.

“What we at the university seek to do is understand more about the provision of that free legal advice: what advice is available, who most needs it, what gaps exist and how might we go about filling them?”

Ian Miller said that due to funding cuts legal advice in some areas is becoming a preserve of the wealthy.

“The extinguishing of legal aid for many types of family and civil cases has meant that a substantial number of members of our community are unable to access basic legal advice on matters which affect them greatly,” he said.

“Although agencies such as the CAB and Law Centre provide valuable and far reaching advice of a very high quality, there is a plain lack of advice available to those who have family or civil legal problems.

“People speak of ‘justice deserts’; that phrase is by no means an exaggeration. Justice Bradford, as we have termed it, aims to open up legal advice to those who most desperately need it. Justice Bradford will not tolerate a justice desert in our city.”

The law clinic is being held every Wednesday during term time. Clients will receive full and comprehensive written advice within three weeks.

Appointments are held on a Wednesday at the Bradford Citizens Advice Bureau office and can be accessed by attending one of the CAB service drop-in sessions or via the advice line on 03442 451 282. Where an appointment with the Law Clinic is appropriate it will be booked following the CAB initial assessment. Details of Citizens Advice Bradford and Airedale and Bradford Law Centre can be found on the following website.

World expert in family business is new Dean at Faculty of Management and Law

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Despite leaving school at 16, the new Interim Dean of the University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law has carved out an international reputation as a respected academic.

Although she did not follow the conventional route of doing A-levels at 18 and going straight to university, new Dean Professor Carole Howorth’s ambitious personality was already evident when she set up her first business at 19.

That ambition has clearly continued to develop throughout her life.

Professor Howorth, who officially took up the Deanship today, did not enter Higher Education until more than a decade later. Once in the university environment she excelled and now has a strong vision for the School of Management as its Dean, starting with strengthening the reputation of the School internationally.

“I’m very excited about stepping up into the Dean role,” she said. “There are two major focus points I want to work on.

“Firstly, we can do more to develop the School of Management’s excellent reputation internationally. We have very strong links across the world but we want to make more of those connections and continue to develop Bradford as a global brand.

“Secondly, there is huge potential for the University to do even more with businesses, both locally and internationally. We can work with businesses in research, executive education and consultancy.

“We like to work in partnership with businesses because it’s about sharing knowledge with each other and with our students. The University isn’t an ivory tower; we do research and teaching that aims to make a difference. Our students go on placement and work on company projects as part of their studies. Our academics share knowledge by working with businesses and public sector organisations on bespoke programmes and research projects.

“We’ll be looking to build more partnerships to share the knowledge that’s created in the University and to learn from businesses."

She is hugely proud of her home city of Bradford, its history and its university.

“Bradford’s a great place to live and work. We have fabulous countryside on our doorstep. Since moving back here, I’ve been really pleased to see how the city is being developed and the positive vibe that is being created.”

Although Professor Howorth did not go on to do A-levels at school her talent did not go unrecognised.

“I was a Bradford Girls Grammar School girl and I was tipped for Oxbridge entry, but I had to leave school at 16 for family reasons,” she said.

“My family struggled to support me through the school, even though I had a scholarship. That’s one of the reasons why I am passionate about access to education. I’m really pleased that the University is developing more foundation degrees to give people a second chance.”

After leaving school Professor Howorth worked at a travel agents in Shipley and as a quantity surveyor’s assistant at Bradford Metropolitan District Council, before qualifying as a riding instructor on a government Training and Opportunities Scheme (TOPS) at Harrogate Equestrian Centre and setting up an equine business at her family’s farm.

Her sister joined the business when she was old enough and Throstle Nest Riding Stables continues to thrive over 30 years later, with Professor Howorth’s niece being lined up to take the reins.

Professor Howorth said: “I came away from the riding business when I was about 30. I wanted to use my brain more. I had done a couple of A-levels at night school but that wasn’t enough to get into university so I did an access course at Bradford College.

“I did my first degree at what was The Management Centre*. When I started the course I had no idea where it was going to take me.

“I knew I was intelligent but I wasn’t sure where I was going with it. I got first class honours and a prize for best student.”

Professor Howorth’s potential was obviously spotted by the School because she was encouraged to apply for an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) scholarship and study for her PhD, which focused on late payments and the funding of small businesses.

While studying for her doctorate she was an academic tutor at The Management Centre (the previous name of the Bradford School of Management). This led to her first lectureship at Nottingham University Business School in Entrepreneurship and Finance. She then moved to a senior lecturer post at Lancaster University Management School, where she progressed to Professor of Entrepreneurship and Family Business.

It was while at Lancaster that she founded the Centre for Family Business Research and she was ranked number two in the world (outside of the USA) for family business research. She was invited to join the STEP (Successful Transgenerational Entrepreneurship Practices) global family enterprising project and became the European leader. Since being at Bradford, Professor Howorth has become the global chair of the project, which includes 40 member universities across the world. The project is administered by Babson College in the USA, which is the number one university in the world for entrepreneurship education and research.

The partner universities work with family businesses in their area to help develop entrepreneurship across generations.

Now, much of her time is taken up with planning and implementing strategies for the Faculty as the Dean, but she still manages to continue her research interests.

Family businesses and entrepreneurship have been a focus of the research and teaching throughout Professor Howorth’s academic career.

Professor Howorth’s current research, funded by the Institute for Family Business (IFB) Research Foundation, is focused on the next generation of family businesses.

“Going from one generation to another can be a critical juncture for family businesses,” she says. “For example, if the next generation isn’t interested in being part of the family firm the future of the business could be in jeopardy – putting jobs at risk. I have been looking at how the next generation can be more engaged in the family business.”

She added: “I’ve always been keen to question assumptions, myths and generalisations about small businesses and family businesses. My background allows me to question ingrained thinking and theories on these businesses.”


* The Management Centre in Bradford predates the university by three years, having been established in 1963. It was one of the first management schools in the country.

Head of Bradford School of Law celebrates triple publishing success

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A specialist in legal education and European law at the University of Bradford School of Law is celebrating after having two books and an academic paper published in quick succession.

Already this year Dr Jess Guth, who is Head of Law at the School, has had published The Legal Academic’s Handbook (Palgrave) and Perspectives on Legal Education, Contemporary Responses to the Upjohn Lectures (Routledge).

Her paper, Transforming the European Legal Order: The European Court of Justice at 60+, has also just been published.

The Legal Academic’s Handbook has contributions from more than 60 established scholars and offers guidance on starting, pursuing, managing and advancing a career in legal academia.

It starts by introducing four fictional academics who want to pursue different career paths in various institutions. Each chapter then delves into a specific topic from the perspective of one of these academics, including making the transition from legal practice, investigating gender issues, gaining recognition for teaching, building a research profile, and organising a specialist conference.

Dr Guth said: “Whether you are looking for ways to overcome challenges or to seek out new opportunities, the book provides practical advice through relevant research, personal experience, and anecdotal evidence.”

Perspectives on Legal Education offers a critical overview of the major debates in legal education set in the context of the Lord Upjohn Lectures. The lectures are an annual event that draws together legal educators and professionals in the United Kingdom to consider the major debates and changes in the field.

The book presents classic lectures alongside contemporary responses from legal education experts. It was a collaboration between Dr Guth, Prof Chris Ashford (Northumbria University) and Prof Nigel Duncan (City University).

It arose from their work as part of the Association of Law Teacher’s Committee and their roles on the editorial board of the association’s journal, The Law Teacher: The International Journal of Legal Education, of which Dr Guth is Deputy Editor. She is also Vice Chair of the Association.

Dr Guth said: “This book offers both an historical overview of how these debates have developed and an up-to-date critical commentary on the state of legal education today.

“My chapter in the book responds to a lecture given by Professor Dawn Oliver on the integration of teaching and research in Law Departments. It argues that both teaching and research should be valued and should not be seen as in tension but as mutually supportive.

“As the full impact of the introduction of university fees, the Legal Education and Training Review and the regulators’ responses are felt in law departments across England and Wales, this collection offers a timely reflection on legal education’s legacy, as well as critical debate on how it will develop in the future.”

Dr Guth’s academic paper was published in Issue 1 of the 2016 Journal of Contemporary European Research. The journal is a special anniversary issue celebrating 65 years of European governance.

It focuses on the European Court of Justice and how its decisions have shaped the legal order at EU level. The paper argues that the Court was initially instrumental in transforming the legal order from mere international law obligation between Member States into a legal system that impacts on us all and that it is still influential and important now because it impacts on the development of law in a wide variety of areas across the entire European Union.

As well as working on law textbooks and academic papers, Dr Guth also has her own blogsite.

Employment judge gives talk on diversity in the judiciary to Bradford School of Law students

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The School of Law welcomed an employment tribunal judge as guest speaker.

Judge David Jones, who sits at the employment tribunal in Leeds, was invited to present the talk on Diversity in the Judiciary to first year students on the Law, Business Studies and Law and Forensics undergraduate degree programmes.

Judge David Jones was formerly a barrister and Head of Chambers at Broadway House Chambers in Bradford. He was appointed as a diversity and community relations judge in July 2015.

He addressed the students about the measures being implemented in recent years to help improve diversity in the judiciary, highlighting the protected characteristics laid out in the Equality Act 2010 (age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation) and its aim to tackle discrimination.

Some of the students were delighted to learn that Judge David Jones, who was state-educated in Bradford, was a former pupil at their school.

He explained that appointments to the judiciary are made purely on merit, and consequently there can be no recourse to positive discrimination, but in the event of a ‘tie-break’, where two candidates are found to have the same qualifications and experience, the candidate from the less represented background can be favoured. He said that the ‘tie-break’ system has been used on a number of occasions recently to help recruit members of minority groups. He also explained that minority groups are far better represented in the tribunal judiciary than in the civil and criminal courts, and there is an attempt to transfer tribunal judges across to the courts, to improve diversity there.

He highlighted the opinions of Baroness Neuberger, formerly chairman of the Advisory Panel on Judicial Diversity, from 2010-11, who favours a career hierarchy for the judiciary, as for other professions, with promotion through the ranks.

There are now a number of fee-paid, part-time judges in the profession, as opposed to full-time salaried judges, and this has really helped women in particular to a career in the judiciary.

Helen Trouille, Lecturer in Law, who organised the session, said: “We heard a few shocking stories of questions asked at interviews in decades gone by, which could not be put these days: for example interviewers asking very personal questions relating to background or sexual orientation.”

In addition to hearing what the judge had to say about improving diversity, the students were encouraged to express their feelings to him, and spoke of the difficulties facing female candidates, candidates from ethnic minority backgrounds, and those not educated at state schools, or even in the United Kingdom.

Mrs Trouille said: “The students spoke of the need to network if they wish to succeed, and of the difficulty of doing this when you lack the contacts which other candidates may have; and the fact that the costs of the Legal Practice Course and the Bar Professional Training Course are so high it can make a legal career unattainable from the very start.

“Students would like to see members of minority groups who have succeeded in their career path sharing information about their success both inside and outside the profession: guidance for those trying to qualify, and, for those inside the profession, information on the importance of equal opportunities for everyone.

"The Law School would like to thank Judge David Jones for giving his time to speak to students, and for his willingness to listen to their comments."

Trio of legal experts from Bradford School of Law present radical paper on post legal aid era at conference

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Three lecturers at the University of Bradford School of Law have presented a paper at the Association of Law Teachers annual conference in Newcastle.

The paper, ‘The Provision of Legal Services in the Post Legal Aid Era: a Proposal for Multi-agency Collaboration between Private and Charitable Suppliers of Legal Services Coordinated by Law Schools’, aims to set out a new model for collaboration between law schools, charitable and not-for-profit providers of legal advice and the private sector law firms to tailor the provision of free legal advice to members of the public who would otherwise be unable to access it.

Written by Dr Kathryn Dutton, Robin Lister and Ian Miller, the paper aims to set out a model of research focused service delivery where university law schools co-ordinate and collaborate with a host of other providers with a view to targeting services where they are most needed.

Dr Dutton, Senior Lecturer, said: "The ALT annual conference was the ideal forum for the School of Law to test drive this research.

“The membership of the association is made up of dedicated law teachers who have a strong sense of social justice.

“Many of the conference delegates have significant experience in the provision of clinical legal education in the advice centre setting and by presenting our research paper at the conference we were able to draw upon that expertise, as well as gain valuable feedback and opinion on our model.”

The School of Law lecturers’ paper complements their work on setting up a free legal advice clinic, Justice Bradford, which sees third year law undergraduate students offer weekly legal advice sessions at the Citizens’ Advice Bureau. The students then provide their clients with a comprehensive written report offering advice on their legal problem.

Justice Bradford's ethos is to promote access to justice to as wide an audience as possible and the School of Law hopes that its research into the effects of legal aid cuts will influence policy at both local and national levels.

Senior Lecturer Mr Lister said: "We want to make a contribution to tackling the advice and justice deficits which affect people in Bradford, as throughout the UK. At the same time our students develop their clinical legal skills and gain first-hand insight into the civil and social justice issues exacerbated by the drastic cuts to legal aid, welfare and other sources of funding."

Justice Bradford clinic director Mr Miller, who is a Barrister at Broadway House Chambers, said: "Currently we are limited to offering only a written legal report but we plan on expanding this advice to include assistance with legal forms and applications, and possibly the attendance at court with clients in one capacity or another. Students will also involve me in legal projects carrying out research into the provision of legal services in the post legal aid world and will be involved in writing and disseminating generic legal advice to particularly vulnerable groups of the community.”

Head of the School of Law Dr Jess Guth, who also attended the ALT conference, said: “Leading lawyers from both practice and academia have long complained that the cuts in legal aid and swinging restrictions on the availability of legal aid will cause a denial of justice for whole sections of society.

“We hope that our research in this area, whilst providing a valuable education for our students and the delivery of a vital service for our local community, will also lead to a greater understanding of the wide ranging effects, both socially and economically, of these cuts.

“I am proud that our school is undertaking this new and exciting project.”

Bradford School of Law students compete in moot competition on challenging criminal defence issue

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The University of Bradford School of Law held a legal mooting competition this month.

The competition saw students posed with a moot problem from the area of criminal law, where they had to discuss causation and the correct interpretation of the partial defence of loss of control in homicide cases.

The event was sponsored by the Incorporated Council of Law Reporting (ICLR), which provided £225 of prize money for the competition.

It was organized and judged by law lecturer Edward Mowlam and second year Bradford School of Law LLB student and Law Society Competitions Secretary, Abigail Sisnett.

Twelve students competed in teams of two over three sessions. Following each session judges gave feedback and highlighted the mooters’ strengths and offered advice on how they could improve on any points.

At the end of three sessions the two highest scoring teams were chosen.

There will now be a grand final of the mooting competition, which will take place in September.

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The students who took part were Georgios Kartalas, Maariyah Ahmed, Patrick Rowlands, Anas Makda, Osikhena Zibiri-Aliu, Mohammad Haroon, Sima Khan, Areekah Ali, Shakeela Bibi, Tazeem Sawaiz, Shuheda Uddin and Amar Hussain.

Miss Sisnett said: "We are very grateful to our dedicated teams for their professionalism and very impressive efforts. All the groups performed very well and delivered well researched arguments."

"The final promises to be a spectacular event. It will also be coupled with our annual Mooting Masterclass, designed to inspire a new group of mooters for the 2016/17 competitions series."

She added: "With the added prestige of ICLR patronage this has enabled our competition to develop into a respected event. The organisers at Bradford would like to take this opportunity to thank the ICLR for its very generous donation."

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ICLR is a not for profit organisation that was established in 1865 as the authorised publisher of the official series of The Law Reports for the Superior and Appellate Courts of England and Wales.

Bradford School of Law seminar to discuss EU referendum and legal implications of free movement of people

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Immigration and what could change after the UK goes to the polls to vote whether or not to stay in the EU will be the topic of a research seminar at the University of Bradford School of Law this week.

Ed Mowlam, a lecturer and PhD researcher at Bradford School of Law, will be chairing the seminar, entitled Brexit, Citizenship and the Free Movement of People.

Mr Mowlam says whether the UK votes to remain or leave the EU in the referendum on June 23, the relationship between the UK and the EU is subject to change.

He said: "Following the protracted European Council meetings in February this year, the ‘Reform Deal’ will instigate its own legal changes.

"While David Cameron did not secure the fundamental far-reaching change set out in the Conservative Party’s 2015 manifesto, there will be some reform of social security payments for new European migrants in the UK, a check on further political integration, and eurozone safeguards.

"None of this however has been backed up by way of treaty change, and the legal questions and ramifications will rumble on should the UK vote to remain in the EU."

The seminar will consider the question of the free-movement of people in the event of a vote for leave.

Mr Mowlam said: "Much is open to speculation; what, if anything, might replace the current model of EU citizenship and free movement of people as it pertains to the UK, and what the subsequent effect might be on those EU citizens already resident in the UK, and vice versa?

"As these questions can only be fully answered once Art. 50 TFEU has been triggered and the withdrawal negotiations have been concluded, this talk will present more questions and suppositions than solid conclusions.

"Nevertheless, considering questions of this sort are vital in the run-up to the referendum.

'Furthermore, this also highlights a disappointing truth of the referendum campaign thus far, in that answers to such questions have not yet been suitably addressed by the Government, or the official Leave or Remain campaigns."

Bradford School of Law international legal expert gives talk on Rwandan genocide prosecution

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A public seminar on the legal issues and framework for prosecution following the genocide in Rwanda in the 1990s was the subject of a well-attended public seminar by a University of Bradford School of Law lecturer this week.

International law expert Helen Trouille talked about the horrendous genocide in the relatively small, landlocked African nation, in which nearly one million people lost their lives - approximately one eighth of the national population.

The victims of the genocide were essentially members of the Tutsi ethnic group, massacred by the more numerous Hutus, although moderate Hutus were not spared the fate of the Tutsis with whom they sympathised.

Mrs Trouille said: "In the years since the genocide, a number of different fora have been used to try the perpetrators of the genocide: the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, instituted by the UN in the months following the genocide, the gacaca courts, local village courts which tried those having played a minor role in the violence, the reconstructed Rwandan national courts, and the courts of other states under the principle of universal jurisdiction."

The seminar looked at the first trial in France of a Rwandan genocide suspect, Pascal Simbikangwa, and the legislation which made it possible.

It considered the challenges of applying national legal frameworks to international crimes, highlights the delay to justice these can cause (20 years in the case of the Rwandan genocide) and the difficulty of finding a forum to try international suspects, at the same time respecting the defendant’s right to a fair trial.

Mrs Trouille said: "This issue is of particular relevance today in the UK as well as in France, following Westminster Magistrates’ Court’s decision in December 2015 not to extradite five genocide suspects to Rwanda.

"Could London have jurisdiction for a similar unprecedented trial in the near future?"

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Pictured above: University of Bradford School of Law lecturer Helen Trouille giving her seminar on the Rwanda genocide and prosecution of its perpetrators‌

Pioneer of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law student learning support service attends graduation at Middle East partner college

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A stalwart of the University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law has returned from a trip to a partner college in the Middle East where he was invited to advise them on setting up an academic learning service.

was asked by the College of Banking and Financial Studies (CBFS) in Oman to offer his expertise in student support.

Dr Sedgley pioneered the at the Faculty of Management and Law.

The service helps students maximise their academic potential, as well as help overseas students adapt quickly to UK academic requirements.

It provides a huge range of services, including various workshops run during term time, one-to-one consultations, as well as printed and online resources to cater for every possible development area.

After discussing the requirements of CBFS, Dr Sedgley provided a report to help implement a successful learning support service.

Dr Sedgley, who is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, said: “I enjoyed my trip to CBFS tremendously – there were several memorable highlights.

“I had a number of very constructive discussions with a wide range of colleagues at CBFS, and I am returning with many ideas to share with faculty colleagues in Bradford.”

While at the CBFS in Oman, Dr Sedgley also represented the University of Bradford at the School’s graduation ceremony and the celebration of its 10 year anniversary of its partnership with Bradford.

CBFS Assistant Dean of Academic Support and Student Affairs, Dr. Yasmeen Shanan Al Balushi thanked Dr Sedgley and Bradford School of Management for its support. She said: “It was our pleasure to have Dr Sedgey with us during CBFS graduation and the celebration of 10 years of the Bradford foundation program at CBFS. It was indeed a proud occasion.”

Guest of honour was Dr Abdullah bin Mohammed Al Sarmi, undersecretary for the Ministry of Higher Education.

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Pictured above: Dr Abdullah bin Mohammad Al Sarmi, undersecretary for the Ministry of Higher Education, second from right, with Dr Martin Sedgley, second from left.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley, front row second from right, at the graduation ceremony at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman, which is a partner college of the University of Bradford School of Management.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley giving a speech at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman.

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Above: Dr Martin Sedgley being presented with a gift at the College of Banking and Financial Studies, Oman, which is a partner college of the University of Bradford School of Management.

A Bradford School of Management stalwart who helps students optimise their learning potential has article published in respected journal

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A University of Bradford Faculty of Management and Law staff member who helps students maximise their academic learning has had her first journal article published.

Amy Allhouse (Sheng-Hui Hsu), who works with Dr Martin Sedgley at the , had her article published in the International Student Experience Journal this week.

The essay, titled ‘Bridging academic differences between China and the UK’, was a joint effort with her husband, Michael Allhouse, who is the Student Engagement Manager at the University of Bradford Union of Students.

It discusses a faculty-based induction programme for a group of direct entry Chinese students studying undergraduate final year programmes at the University of Bradford (UoB), Faculty of Management and Law (FoML), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention from the students’ perspective.

Known as the ‘Bridge Programme’, it is designed to aid transition and to develop the students’ understanding of UK academic requirements. It has been running for the last four years.

Student feedback was sought through a number of different means: a questionnaire, focus group, students’ further engagement and their academic achievement. In particular, students recognized the benefits of using exemplars to contextualize analytical writing as part of the induction experience.

Amy said: “Our Bridge Programme focuses on easing the transition of the learning mind-set. We focus on developing new learning skills in the Chinese students and making them aware of the challenges in differences in the learning culture, such as writing skills and the need to be more proactive in lectures, seminars, group work and having a wider reading base, because in China learning is much more defined and restrictive.”

The Bridge Programme is not specifically about developing language proficiency because all the students who are enrolled will already have the required IELTS 6 grade.

Amy said: “I’m really pleased we’ve been published in this journal because the readers of it are people who work in learning support and language support.

“What is interesting about the journal is that it also includes students’ perspectives, while it is also peer-reviewed.”

She added: “The Effective Learning Service helps all our students, not just Chinese. The Bridge Programme is just one example of what we do. We are aiming to roll it out to all international students this summer.”

The International Student Experience Journal is a peer-reviewed online publication for those involved in researching, teaching and providing services to international students in Higher Education in the UK and other English speaking countries. The Journal links the everyday concerns of university staff including academics, researchers, EAP practitioners and the students themselves with insights gained from related academic disciplines such as applied linguistics, education, psychology, and sociology.

Amy, who is originally from Taiwan, completed an MBA at Bradford School of Management 10 years ago and started working at the University nearly seven years ago.

Professor Zahir Irani appointed Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law

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Professor Zahir Irani has taken up his post as the Dean of the Faculty of Management and Law at the University of Bradford.

Professor Irani brings a wealth of experience to the role, and has a clear vision for the Faculty. He said: “The Higher Education landscape is rapidly changing, with increased competition, changing student demands and new Government policy all adding to the complexity of working and managing Universities. I think being distinctive is part of the solution and integral to my ambition for the Faculty of Management and Law; knowing what makes you unique and where you can add value throughout the student journey and exciting for our students. It is here, with my management team and staff, that I will be developing a bold new vision for the faculty that brings together research, learning and knowledge transfer”.

Professor Irani held several senior management positions at Brunel University London, the most recent of which being the Dean of College (Business, Arts and Social Sciences - CBASS) which he setup following an organisational restructuring from eight Schools into three Colleges. Prior to this role, he was seconded full-time to Whitehall, where he was a Senior Policy Advisor at the Cabinet Office during part of the coalition Government. He is however most proud of being Head of the Brunel Business School, where in 2013 it was awarded the Times Higher Education Business School of the Year under his leadership.

He completed a BEng (Hons) at Salford University before then accepting a research position in industry where he finished his Master’s degree by research. He has a PhD in the area of investment evaluation and undertook his leadership development at the Harvard Business School. He has an extensive list of 3 and 4 star publications in the area of information systems, Project Management and eGovernment, and significant grant income from national and international funding councils.

He said: “I am very excited about leading a triple accredited School of Management and in supporting a developing School of Law. The faculty has an excellent heritage and I look forward to working with colleagues in preparation for the challenges we will face around the REF, TEF and internationalisation.”

University of Bradford professor awarded fellowship by the College of Occupational Therapists

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Professor Gail Mountain, Chair of Applied Dementia Research at the University of Bradford, was announced as one of only three 2016 fellows who were recognised for their exceptional service and outstanding contribution to the profession.

The award of Fellowship is the highest honour the College can bestow on members.

Gail was a practising occupational therapist for 13 years before becoming involved in research. Her research interests are focussed upon improving the quality of life of older people through provision of appropriate interventions, good design and by facilitating participation, reflecting her occupational therapy background.

View Professor Gail Mountain's academic profile

Dementia is a longstanding clinical and research interest; Gail is a co-investigator for a trial called ‘Valuing active life in Dementia’ which is evaluating an occupational therapy intervention for people with dementia and their family supporters post diagnosis. She is also involved in the Promoting Independence in Dementia research programme which involves development and evaluation of a brief intervention for people with dementia following diagnosis. Gail is leading an EU project on outcome measures for psychosocial interventions in dementia and is involved in a UK project to identify a core outcome set for dementia trials. Most recently she was awarded an NIHR grant to conduct a randomised controlled trial of an occupational based group and individual based intervention 'Journeying through Dementia' which was developed through her previous MRC Lifelong Health and Wellbeing award.

Gail is also Associate Dean Research and Knowledge Transfer at the Faculty of Health Studies, and Professor of Health Services Research (assisted living research) within the Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Group at the University of Sheffield.

On hearing the news Gail said: “I am thrilled to receive this award. Throughout my research career I have carried the values and interests of occupational therapy with me so it is very special to be recognised in this way.

Every year members of the College are invited to nominate their colleagues for a Fellowship of the College of Occupational Therapists, or a Merit Award in recognition of their special contribution to the profession.

Julia Scott, Chief Executive, College of Occupational Therapists said: “It gives us great pleasure to award Gail with a Fellowship from the College for her outstanding contribution to the profession. I congratulate her on this well-deserved honour which recognises her pioneering research to improve the lives of people living with dementia.”

The other two fellows were Dr Sidney Chu, Company Director and Consultant Trainer / Therapist of Kid Power Therapy and Training Company Ltd and Professor Suzanne Martin, Professor of Occupational Therapy and Director of Academic Enterprise within the Faculty of Life and Health Sciences of Ulster University.

Gail will receive her award at a ceremony in London on 14 July 2016.

Queen's Anniversary Prize for world-leading work to improve the lives of people living with dementia

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The presentation, by the Prince of Wales, was made at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace attended by University Chancellor Kate Swann, Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Cantor and Professor Murna Downs, Chair in Dementia Studies at the University.

The University of Bradford is one of only 21 institutions in this round to receive the prestigious accolade, which honours world-class excellence and achievement. It is the highest form of national recognition that UK higher education institutions can achieve. The University has been honoured for its leadership in developing person-centred dementia care, and for influencing policy and practice in the UK and internationally.

First awarded in 1994, the biennial Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are awards within the nation’s honours system. They recognise outstanding excellence, genuine innovation and practical benefit across a range of work taking place in UK higher and further education. The Royal Anniversary Trust administers the scheme and its Awards Council makes recommendations for awards to The Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister.

The University’s research has been central to the transformation of care for people affected by dementia. Bradford’s role and impact is based on sustained excellence, spanning research and high-quality teaching and learning, with an unmatched record of engagement with care providers, regulators, and people with dementia and their families.

Bradford’s work in dementia care has had outstanding impact, reaching a wide range of care settings in the UK and beyond, including working with care providers and national bodies on new approaches to developing a highly skilled workforce, and measuring the quality of care. The University has trained over 10,000 care staff across four continents and enabled adoption of person-centred approaches in policy and practice.

The University’s research focused on two key themes: helping people to live well with dementia, and improving the quality of care for people with dementia, both driven by the School of Dementia Studies.

Living well with dementia examines the experience of dementia from the perspectives of both the people living with the condition and their families, from diagnosis through to end-of-life. The aim is to apply this knowledge to ensure optimal wellbeing for people affected by dementia. Research projects examine a range of influences on the experience of living with dementia including social, cultural and family contexts; relational and personal history; unique cognitive changes associated with different types of dementia; and user involvement and empowerment.

Improving the quality of care for people with dementia focuses on developing ways to understand, evaluate and improve care, with a focus on care provision by paid staff. The principles of person-centred care, developed within the School of Dementia Studies, are a core part of this research theme. The School continually seeks to test, evaluate and improve the tools and materials it has developed around person-centred care. Its Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) tool, developed to help implement these principles, is currently being evaluated in a multi-site, £2.4m project funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The aim is to assess the effectiveness of DCM in helping staff reduce agitation in people with dementia and improve their quality of life, as well as improving the working environment for staff, increasing the quality of their engagements with patients and reducing staff sickness and absence.

Professor Brian Cantor, Vice-Chancellor of the University, said: “We are extremely proud and honoured to be awarded The Queen’s Anniversary Prize for our dementia research, education and training. The University has an established record in carrying out truly great research that significantly impacts on the world. This is the first Queen’s Anniversary Prize that we have been awarded, and it demonstrates the difference that the University of Bradford is making in influencing policy and care for the most vulnerable people in our society, in the UK and across the world.

“One of the University’s key academic themes is advanced healthcare, and dementia studies is a key element of this. An ageing society, with increasing long-term conditions such as dementia, poses considerable global challenges, creating increasing demand on services with fewer resources to deliver them. Bradford’s leadership in delivering solutions in the field of dementia care, both in improving lives and quality of care, puts real meaning into the fact that 96 per cent of our research is ranked as world leading or internationally recognised.”

Born in Bradford featured in BBC Radio 4 documentary

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BBC Radio 4 has broadcast a feature on Born in Bradford, one of the biggest and most important medical research studies undertaken in the UK.

Born in Bradford is a long term study of a cohort of 13,500 children, born at Bradford Royal Infirmary between March 2007 and December 2010, whose health is being tracked from pregnancy through childhood and into adult life.

A birth cohort study is a powerful way of researching into the many influences that shape our lives: our parents and our wider family, our genes, the way we choose to live, the local environment, the services we access and how all these come together to affect our health and well-being. The information collected from the BiB families is being used to find the causes of common childhood illnesses and to explore the mental and social development of this new generation.

Listen to the programme online now on iPlayer Radio.

For more information on the project, visit the Born in Bradford website.

Bradford expert helps review national patient safety education and training

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Professor Gerry Armitage from the University of Bradford's Faculty of Health Studies has been working with other renowned health experts to improve patient safety education and training.

Professor Armitage, along with Professor Sir Norman Williams (Chair of the Commission), Professor Wendy Reid (Health Education England) and Dr Gianluca Fontana (Imperial College) were invited to sit on an expert panel at the launch of the recently published report by the Commission on Education and Training for Patient Safety.

The Commission was made up of patient representatives and patient safety experts from clinical practice, professional and statutory bodies, and universities. Working alongside an academic team from the Patient Safety Translational Research Centre at Imperial College, the Commission have developed a comprehensive educational framework for all health care workers with the express objectives of learning from errors, reducing risk and devising effective strategies to prevent harm occurring.

The Commission’s recommendations include mandatory training for patient safety - informed by human factors and from NHS Trust board level to clinical ward level; more inter-professional learning; advancing the skills to enhance the NHS duty of candour; increasing staff knowledge of improvement science and behaviour change; and effective evaluation of educational provision.

The findings and recommendations are of real importance to all health professional educators including those at the University of Bradford. The University currently provides a wide range of undergraduate and post graduate training, and specific provision for patient safety education, led by Professors Gerry Armitage and Mohamed Mohammed.

Gerry warmly welcomes both the Commission’s findings and recommendations: “Good patient safety education is an essential first step in reducing avoidable harm. I am reassured by the fact that the University’s Post Graduate Certificate in Patient Safety, which began two years ago, has included almost all of the Commission’s recommended priorities since its inception.

“The course is underpinned by human factors principles and my colleague Professor Mohammed is a leading expert in improvement science, which forms a significant component of the student’s assessed work. Our challenge is to effectively publicise the course across the region and beyond.

“Moreover, we will strive to ensure the content and outcomes of our undergraduate programmes continue to reflect the Commission’s recommendations and provide the best possible foundation for safe practice and continuous learning for patient safety”

Set out under four broad themes, the report makes a series of recommendations that the panel believe will make the greatest difference to patient safety both now and in the future.

View the full ‘Improving safety through education and training’ report.

Born in Bradford extends research with £3.5 million funding boost

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The landmark Born in Bradford research project, tracking the lives of nearly 14,000 babies born in Bradford, has secured a £3.5 million boost to extend its research.

The funding from the Medical Research Council and Economic and Social Research Council (Populations and Systems Medicine / General Population Science Boards) amounts to £3,576,155.

It is for a five year project to revisit all families recruited to the Born in Bradford study. From summer 2016 researchers will be able to collect updated data from mothers, fathers and all the BiB children to get a picture of their current health, education and well-being status.

This part of the BiB study will be jointly led by Prof Deborah Lawlor (University of Bristol) and Professor Kate Pickett (University of York). Co-Investigators include Professor Neil Small and Professor Mohamed Mohammed from the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford.

Returning to the BiB participants nine years after their initial recruitment will allow the team to study changes over time, but will also provide rich data for further studies.

Professor Neil Small said: “Now ten years from the start of the Born in Bradford study we can see its increasing impact in the city and across the world. The new funding from the MRC and ESRC underlines how multidisciplinary the project is. It allows us to look at change in the more than 13,000 children we are following and include new areas of focus, how the children get on at school for example. BiB children can now be followed up into adolescence and beyond.

“It's an exciting time for our project team, for our partners in the city and beyond and for all the families whose participation has helped make this study one of the jewels in Bradford’s crown.”

n-able chairs celebrate with Diversity Festival planning team

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The n-able chairs along with two other members of the Diversity Festival planning team were very proud to receive the Vice-Chancellors's Awards for Outstanding Achievement 2016 for the delivery of the first ever Diversity Festival.

Nominating the team, Rev. Suzanne Vernon-Yorke said, "the planning of the Diversity Festival Week was a huge time commitment, which the team undertook on top of their own regular work commitments.

"The endeavour was planned and implemented as a gift to the university and wider community and part of the 50th anniversary celebrations.

"It succeeded in bringing many people together and played its part in helping to build community in the university."

Read more on the .

n-able chairs celebrate with honorary graduate

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n-able nominated Francesca Martinez (wobbly comedian and activist) for an Honorary Doctorate.

She attended the in July 2016 where Cath Rose presented the oration.

Gill and Cath enjoyed meeting Francesca and sharing her special day.

Disability History Month 2016

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In celebration of Disability History Month 2016, n-able and Choices for All joined together to smash the Guinness World Record for the most participants in a static hand cycle relay in eight hours.

The event took place in the Richmond Atrium on Wednesday 7 December. We are now awaiting the result from GWR and as soon as we know, we will post our record breaker status here!

n-able added to the Global Diversity List

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We are very pleased to announce that n-able has been added to the Top 10 Disability Networks - 2016 in the Global Diversity List.

The award "recognises the achievements of employee network groups established to work on disability diversity within organisations".

Global Diversity List, supported by The Daily Telegraph, said: "N-able is an established staff network at the University of Bradford promoting and celebrating disability. n-able provides a forum for disabled staff to share knowledge, have a collective voice and access appropriate support. n-able collaborates with the University to raise the profile of disability and promote inclusion, while also working with external organisations and individuals to increase member knowledge and showcase n-able’s work."

n-able Highly Commended in international award

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n-able has been highly commended at the European Diversity Awards 2016.

The network was shortlisted in the category of Outstanding Employee Network Group of the Year award for its work towards the Diversity Festival held at the University in April 2016.

It was also recognised for its strategic work towards the policies and procedures supporting disabled staff at the University.

n-able is shortlisted for European Diversity Awards

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n-able has been shortlisted for the Outstanding Employee Network Group of the Year category at the European Diversity Awards 2016.

The chairs and two members of the network will attend the awards ceremony at the Natural History Museum on the 29 November.

Wish us luck!

North Korea's nuclear threat in the limelight

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Professor Christoph Bluth, Professor of International Relations and Security.

The test of a nuclear device on 6 January 2016 by North Korea once again highlighted the fact that since the end of the Cold War 26 years ago the Korean peninsula has become a major fault line in the regional security of Northeast Asia as North Korea has pursued nuclear weapons to support its diplomacy towards the South and the United States.

Much of the discussion around this test which is North Korea’s fourth test of a nuclear explosive device has been around the Pyongyang’s claim that his was a thermonuclear device (also known as a hydrogen bomb). There is no concrete evidence to support this claim, which is dismissed by experts. However it is important to understand why the DPRK is seeking to demonstrate its military prowess in this fashion.

The division of the Korean peninsula has always been a source of instability given that neither side is satisfied with the status quo as a permanent solution. After North Korea lost economic support and reliable security guarantees from its erstwhile sponsors (Russia and China), the top priority for North Korea has been regime survival. The Kim regime feels threatened by the changed geopolitical environment and in particular what it calls the ‘hostile policy’ of the United States, and its severe economic difficulties.

During the 1990s it looked as if North Korea was willing to curtail its nuclear programme in return for economic and political concessions. This changed during the Bush administration and a decisive factor was the Iraq war, which seemed to demonstrate the need for a capacity to deter a US attack. The North Korean elite believes that the nuclear programme enhances the status of the DPRK and is needed for deterrence against external aggression. It also provides internal legitimacy for the regime by demonstrating that North Korea is a great and powerful country.

On the other hand the external threat to North Korea is primarily created by the nuclear programme in the first place. There is a curious paradox that underlies North Korean foreign policy, which is that it is fundamentally predicated on making North Korea appear dangerous to the international community. This motivates the United States and other countries to engage with North Korea in order to mitigate the threat, but in order for this to be sustained the threat has to be periodically revived. This creates the seemingly inescapable cycle of conflict and cooperation. It also accounts for North Korea’s diplomacy, which to outsiders sometimes appears erratic and even irrational.

The problem is that this diplomacy has run its course and neither the United States nor South Korea are willing to make substantial concessions in response to North Korea’s military threats. The danger is that North Korea will resort to ever greater threats in order to achieve its objectives. Therefore some level of engagement with North Korea over arms control and economic cooperation is vital. While denuclearization may not be achievable for now, North Korea may be prepared to agree to limits on its nuclear programme in return for a range of political and economic agreements. This is why the US “strategy of patience” may no longer be advisable and greater efforts to pursue arms control with North Korea should be undertaken.

, Professor of International Relations and Security

Blowing the whistle on competitive scrums

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Jamie Beck, Radiography Lecturer at the University of Bradford.

The issue of risk in both rugby union and rugby league has been a widely debated topic over recent years and much has been done already to improve safety. Yet with 63 collapses for every 100 scrums in last year’s Six Nations tournament and evidence to suggest that the statistics on cervical spine injuries do not take into account whether the player is involved in the scrum or not (Brown et al, 2014) – should we consider the end of competitive scrums in rugby union?

As another major rugby tournament draws near, recent discussion has focused on the risk of head trauma and concussion, both short and long term, which has become a highly debated issue in sports across the world. Much of the impetus for this has arisen from American sports such as American Football and ice hockey.

Some parallels can be drawn between these American sports and rugby. The high impact nature of the sport is, in part, what makes it appealing to players and spectators but with this high impact comes a significant risk of injury. It is accurate to suggest that many, if not all participation sports come with a risk of injury, but in rugby the risk of both head and cervical spine injuries are increased and it is these injuries that have both life threatening and life altering consequences for the players involved and for their families.

The risk of both head and cervical spine injury is heightened by the seemingly increasing size and strength of professional rugby players at the highest level of both codes but at that level, the players are of similar size and the medical support teams are instantly available. Lower down the pyramid and particularly in junior games where young people of different heights and build are often put against each other despite being in the same age bracket, the potential for injury is arguably greater. This is particularly true if one scrum is more dominant than another.

Whilst much of the recent focus has been on head injuries and concussion, in my opinion greater awareness is needed about another potential threat from rugby, the damage that can be done to the cervical spine which has the potential to cause tetraplegia. Reviewing the literature, it is the tackle and the scrum that represent the occasions when a cervical spine injury are more likely to occur. The probability of cervical spine injury occurring as a result of a tackle can be reduced by good tackle technique are proper enforcement of the laws of the game, but it is the scrum that remains an area of concern with some evidence suggesting that the number of cervical spine injuries resulting from scrum collapses has been underestimated as the research is not focussed on those players who form the scrum.

One of the key differences between rugby union and rugby league is that the scrum in rugby league is treated merely as a method of restarting the game where the ball enters a six man pack and exits quickly to allow the game to continue. The rugby union scrum is much more of an integral part of the game with considerable forces applied by each pack of eight players which makes collapsing of the scrum more likely. Less research has been produced about rugby league as a sport but what does exist suggests that having these non-competitive scrums can reduce the incidences of cervical spine injury. Rugby union purists may suggest that the scrum represents an integral part of their sport which has been played for many decades and that cervical spine injuries are rare. Improvements have been made in the conduct of competitive scrums in rugby union but the risk of injury cannot be completely eradicated and one would argue from a medical perspective that, acknowledging that cervical spine injuries are uncommon, the consequences of a cervical spine injury are too severe to be ignored. This is particularly true at a time of increased awareness of safety in sport.

The main focus of my article was to evaluate the medical imaging strategy of cervical spine injuries in rugby players which had traditionally been challenging due to patient size and new NICE Guidelines on cervical spine injuries are expected soon. The imaging can only come after an injury. If we are serious about protecting particularly our young players from cervical spine injury then the continued practice of competitive scrummaging should be questioned. The risk of injury cannot ever be totally excluded but greater focus is needed on those head and neck injuries that have significant long term consequences.

paper is available online at Radiography an international, English language, peer-reviewed journal of radiographic imaging and radiation therapy.

Ref: Brown J, Lambert M, Hendricks S, Readhead C, Verhagen E, Burger N and Viljoen W (2014) Are we currently underestimating the risk of scrum-related neck injuries in rugby union front-row players? Abstract from the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport, Monaco 2014

Cambridgeshire find revolutionises our understanding of Bronze Age life and ritual in the east of England

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Ben Jennings reacts to BBC article on findings at Must Farm quarry.

Archaeological investigation of our distant past often relies upon ephemeral evidence for structures, microscopic plant remains, small pottery sherds, and, as one well known comedian stated, “a series of small walls”. The current findings at Must Farm quarry, Cambridgeshire, excavated by Cambridge Archaeological Unit and funded by Historic England in association with Forterra – the quarry owner – provide a significant opportunity to glimpse life as it would have been during the Bronze Age, some 1000 years before the Roman occupation of Britain.

The evidence so far excavated is quite remarkable. Of course, the ‘shiny’ finds, such as bronze weapons and tools, and glass work beads do grab attention. And rightly, for they provide possible indicators of the status of the people living at the site. These items suggest the ability of the prehistoric Must Farm inhabitants to access trade and exchange networks spreading across Britain and continental Europe.

Yet, more remarkable are what would appear to be relatively mundane finds. Some of the largely intact ceramic vessels recovered contain charred and preserved remnants of their last contents. Future analysis of these remains will provide an indication for the types of food and drink which the Bronze Age dwellers were preparing and consuming. It is quite remarkable to think that these pots and jars could provide the recipe for a marketable ‘Bronze Age porridge’ to start the day.

We can also get a glimpse of the forms of clothes that may have been seen around the village. Preserved textiles, made from plant fibres, given an idea of the forms of garment worn, and how they may have appeared – and felt.

Bronze Age Site

By far the most impressive remains however, in my opinion, are the structural elements visible. When dealing with Bronze Age – an era when the vast majority of structures are built from timber – settlements archaeologists typically have to work with a series of post holes – small round pits which were cut in to the ground and a structural timber was driven into, much as we do when building a garden fence – which we can see because the timber has rotten over time and the soil within takes on a different colour. Not only does Must Farm have the supporting posts in situ, they also have remains of the building super-structure which have collapsed inside the building. This provides not only the opportunity to understand the primary construction of the Bronze Age round house, but also to examine how the upper levels and internal space were laid out and separated.

Preservation issues have been key to the survival of so much wonderful organic material at Must Farm. The site is within the Fenland of east England, and the largely waterlogged nature of the surrounding land creates excellent conditions for the survival of timber, food remains and textiles over thousands of years. When combined with the fact that the structure appears to have been destroyed in a burning event – it is not yet clear if this was deliberate or accidental – the carbonization of many materials creates a double benefit to preservation; carbonisation and waterlogging.

In this respect the structures uncovered at Must Farm definitely represent the best preserved Bronze Age dwellings in Great Britain, indeed rivalling the ‘lake-villages’ of the Alpine region which were recently given UNESCO World Heritage Status. In much of the media coverage, the site was often termed as “Britain’s ‘Pompeii’”, in my opinion the comparison is somewhat understating Must Farm; this site is far more interesting than Pompeii, which really is “a series of walls” (even if they are quite big walls).

Must Farm not only provides an insight into the occupants of a small settlement in the Fens, but revolutionises much of our understanding of Bronze Age life and ritual in the east of England. The Fenlands are well known for their preservation, and many interesting sites and finds have been found in the area, such as dug-out boats and trackways which provide further information of human occupation in the area, but slightly further afield at Flag Fen. Despite the numerous findings in the wetland area, there had until now been no indication for settlement within the wetlands, it was presumed to be a resource gathering and ‘ritualised’ area, while the villages and settlements occurred on the dryland islands and edges of the Fens. Must Farm necessitates a re-consideration of Bronze Age occupation within the Fens, and across England’s wetlands as a whole.

The excavation is ongoing, and hopefully more exciting finds will be discovered as the archaeologists progress through the complex mass of burned and collapse structures. Fortunately, the site has an active ‘diary’ which features the latest information. See the Must Farm website for more details.

, Research Assistant in Archaeological Sciences

Education the key to getting more girls into STEM

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Dr Andrea Cullen looks at the issue of the gender pay gap and encouraging more girls into STEM subjects and careers.

Despite half the population being female, women remain under-represented in key professions and industries, neither earning equal pay nor having the same opportunities as male counterparts. The fact that we're still talking about a gender pay gap in 2016 is an indictment and the debate and the fact that the government is trying to address this is to be welcomed. But more needs to be done, including educating children from an early age about gender equality and eradicating gender stereotypes.

The gender gap in Computer science is not a new phenomenon. The situation was no different in the 80s. It is difficult to understand how or why it has remained so male dominated. The University of Bradford, like all others in the UK, has had a steady 15-20% of female students studying Computer Science. The staff percentages overall in Computer Science are similar. Three female academics working in Computer Science are all Cyber security specialists. This is somewhat out of sync as this is even more of male-dominated arena but it puts us in a fantastic position to showcase possibilities for young women.

At Bradford we intend to make it our mission to redress the gender balance within Computer Science. Our target is to accomplish at least 50/50 female to male students and we would like to be known as the university that managed to eliminate the gender gap.

Part of the problem is that girls have already opted out of Computer Science at school to take subjects seen as traditionally female areas. You only need to have successfully studied GCSE English and maths to study Computer Science. Designing entry requirements in this way opens up the opportunity for students who may have thought this degree was closed to them at school. As such, we need to encourage more girls who have studied music, history and English as they can often make fantastic Computer Scientists. The subject is creative, artistic, problem-solving and needs great communication skills.

Experience shows that girls are as good at the subject as boys. Universities need to pull out all the stops to visit schools and encourage more girls to take up Computer Science at degree level, in particular targeting those not currently studying it in school. We need to ensure they understand that this is an exciting and fantastic career and one that is still open to them. For example, we are running a roadshow to showcase existing female students and staff as role models to demonstrate how this is an area where women can be successful.

Dr Andrea Cullen, Senior Lecturer in Computer Science, University of Bradford

The ET Game - learning how to fail better

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Dr Carlton Reeve, Head of Games, Animation and Visual Effects.

The history of the videogames industry is littered with the corpses of terrible games. Many of the gravestones are for games based on feature films and the story in the BBC Magazine about the epic failure of the ET game — described as the worst video game in history — is a majestic tomb to misadventure.

Making a game of an existing story is always a risky venture. Translating an idea from one format to another is notoriously difficult. Once realised on a movie screen or imagined off the pages of a book, the plotlines, and indeed the character behaviours, are fixed in the minds of the audience. Retelling a great story often makes it more vivid, but replaying the same story will only ever have limited appeal because we know that, whatever we do, the outcome will always be the same. Any attempt to recreate a well-known tale with any intrigue is going to be a struggle - we know how it’s going to end - there’s no surprise in the game play, just frustration.

Games set in story “worlds” have fared much better. Extending the Star Wars universe, or even Lego-themed variations of Indiana Jones or Batman, gives players the chance to make the stories bigger than the originals. Placing the action in a familiar environment and letting players go beyond The End is a perfect way to cater for a demand for more - there is no take-your-breath-away revelation about discovering who Luke Skywalker's father is in a game of the film but sitting in an X-wing fighter and liberating new worlds from the Empire will always be thrilling.

While the ET game is a good example of the dangers of relying too much on a ‘brand name’ over gameplay it’s real lesson is more profound.

Although the game effectively wiped out Atari, it didn’t kill the industry. The resilience of the gaming community reflects a key feature of the games it makes and plays. What successful games do brilliantly is teach us how cope with failure. Indeed, while non-gamers might imagine games to be defined by "fun", most gamers would say they are characterised by grinding effort and repeatedly getting it wrong. What good games do is show us how to try again; they highlight our mistakes, demonstrate the value of perseverance and encourage and reward success.

The story of the ET game shows this principle in practice. The designer, Howard Scott Warshaw, didn't just create the worst video game ever; he also designed one of the best — Yars Revenge. Twenty years after the ET game was buried, the global games business is the world’s most successful entertainment format, surpassing television, film and publishing combined. If there’s one thing games development teaches us, it’s how to fail — and learning from our failures is how we get better.

The University of Bradford degrees in Games Design, Animation and Visual Effects prepare students to be industry-ready, with graduates going on to work on Grand Theft Auto, Just Dance 4, Watch Dogs, the Burnout series and Ryse to name just a few.

Dr Carlton Reeve is the Head of Games, Animation and Visual Effects at the University of Bradford’s School of Media, Design and Technology, delivering cutting-edge courses for the Creative Industries and helping to produce the next generation of games designers.

A new, potent drug combination may cure some melanomas

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A new study suggests that one in five melanoma patients treated with a pair of immunotherapy drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, might be cured of their disease.

Furthermore, 69% of the 142 study patients were still alive after two years. Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and the sixth most common cancer in the UK, killing more than 2,000 people each year.

Immunotherapy refers to treatment that encourages the patient’s immune system to attack cancer cells. Original, but relatively unsuccessful forms of this treatment involved the use of anti-tumour “vaccines” based on proteins produced specifically by cancer cells, or even whole cells that had been inactivated. More recently a radically different and far more effective approach has been taken, which involves removing the naturally occurring inhibitors or “breaks” acting on the immune system. One of the most important of these is the PD-1 ligand that binds to the PD-1 protein on the surface of T-cells, which are immune cells that can invade tumours and selectively kill cancer cells.

Tumours that make PD-1 ligand are able to switch T cells to an inactive state, blocking the immune response. Nivolumab is an antibody that binds to PD-1 and prevents this interaction between cancer cells and T-cells, hence promoting the destruction of the tumour. Ipilimumab also helps take the break of the immune system but has a different mechanism of action; instead of disrupting the interaction between T-cells and cancer cells it blocks an inhibitory circuit that exists between two different immune cells – dendritic cells and T cells – through binding to a protein called CTLA4.

The logic of combining these drugs in a clinical trial was to enhance the killing of cancer cells, thereby destroying more of the tumour than either drug could on its own.

The results of the new trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that this approach can be successful. However, both ipilimumab and nivolumab are associated with significant side effects, and this was also reflected in the new trial, as around 50% of the patients had to stop treatment due to life-threatening side effects. Side effects are often more difficult to manage with drugs that act on the immune system as the changes that occur sometimes take a long time to reverse after treatment has finished, and indeed, in some cases, the immune system may never fully return to its original state. These problems can be made still worse by the nature of the drugs themselves; antibodies can persist for many months in the body, unlike other types of drugs that are usually gone in a few days.

Further refinements of this very promising approach are therefore needed before it can form the basis of a safe and effective treatment.